ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Old's Cool
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-15-2012, 06:40 AM   #1
Andyvh1959 OP
Cheesehead Klompen
 
Andyvh1959's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2012
Location: Da frozen tundra, 1.5 mile west of Lambeau
Oddometer: 630
Mixmatching brands for parts

I have noticed the Brits and riders in Europe (since it seems they keep a lot of older bikes on the road), are quite adept at mixing the good parts from various brands (usually all Japanese, or all British) to whatever bike they are building. Kawwy parts on Suzukis, or Yamaha parts on Hondas. Makes me wonder if they have some resources or knowledge we don't have. Like which steering head sets fit which bikes, swingarms, etc.

I especially like modern suspensions grafted to older bikes, it just opens up a new world of cool old bike possibilities.

It seems to be growing more here in the US with the popularity of cafe racers, bobbers, rat bikes, street fighters, etc.
__________________
When life throws you a curve,.....lean into it!
42+ year rider, 22+ year MSF Coach, Street, Dirt, Ice, ride em all!
Andyvh1959 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2012, 10:06 PM   #2
mfp4073
Beastly Adventurer
 
mfp4073's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2010
Location: Central Florida
Oddometer: 2,193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andyvh1959 View Post
I have noticed the Brits and riders in Europe (since it seems they keep a lot of older bikes on the road), are quite adept at mixing the good parts from various brands (usually all Japanese, or all British) to whatever bike they are building. Kawwy parts on Suzukis, or Yamaha parts on Hondas. Makes me wonder if they have some resources or knowledge we don't have. Like which steering head sets fit which bikes, swingarms, etc.

I especially like modern suspensions grafted to older bikes, it just opens up a new world of cool old bike possibilities.

It seems to be growing more here in the US with the popularity of cafe racers, bobbers, rat bikes, street fighters, etc.

I keep thinking there has got to be an easier and cheaper way to put good brakes on the front of an airhead.
__________________
1974 BMW R90/6 Bettie #1, 04 Triumph Bonneville
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Blank
loner, lonegunman, get it. That’s the whole point. I like the lifestyle, the image. Look a the way I dress.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bgoodsoil View Post
Cavemen must've designed them shortly after inventing the wheel.
mfp4073 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2012, 09:52 AM   #3
ivantheterrible
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: Hillsborough, NC
Oddometer: 512
http://www.clubchopper.com/forums/me...diameters.html

This might be helpful.
ivantheterrible is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2012, 09:37 AM   #4
anonny
What could go wrong?
 
anonny's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2007
Location: Beautiful Revelstoke BC
Oddometer: 5,463
That is exactly what I did here, 71 H1b Kawasaki with a 93 GSXR front and rear suspension. It's easily doable given enough time, money and research





__________________
Kawasaki H1 build thread

71- 450 Honda CL re & re

Just another pathetic sheep following the herd

anonny is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2013, 09:22 AM   #5
Andyvh1959 OP
Cheesehead Klompen
 
Andyvh1959's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2012
Location: Da frozen tundra, 1.5 mile west of Lambeau
Oddometer: 630
No luck on that clubchopper website. I tired it a couple of times and nothing came up.
__________________
When life throws you a curve,.....lean into it!
42+ year rider, 22+ year MSF Coach, Street, Dirt, Ice, ride em all!
Andyvh1959 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2013, 10:34 AM   #6
jbcaddy
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jan 2010
Location: Oroville & Placerville, California U.S.of A.
Oddometer: 1,196
still a long ways to go on my project. Yamaha FJ forks, Suzuki 4shoe brakes on a '71 R75/5 BMW

quite a lot of info in airheads on putting different forks on GS models here in ADV. and several have modern upsidedown forks on thier beemers
jbcaddy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2013, 01:09 PM   #7
Rob Farmer
Beastly Adventurer
 
Rob Farmer's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2002
Location: Loughborough, Leicestershire. England
Oddometer: 5,161
Most of the guys I know just "suck it and see" with parts and then see if they can be made to fit. There's a lot of parts borrowing and a lot of parts laying about that didn't fit anything.

The first one I did in the 80s was a suzuki gt550 front end into a 64 triumph t120r. Worked great and gave me a decent twin disk front end for not much cash.
Rob Farmer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2013, 01:17 PM   #8
16VGTIDave
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2012
Location: Drumbo, Ontario, Canada
Oddometer: 353
It helps to have access to a good motorcycle wrecking yard or 2.

I was looking to repair the swing arm pivot on my '82 Yamaha Maxim and couldn't find parts for it at a reasonable price. I made a drawing with accurate measurements and went to a local yard. As luck would have it, they had just finished tearing down a 2006 Kawasaki Ninja 250 that was an insurance write-off. The frame and swing arm were still waiting to be dis-assembled. I measured and found that the critical dimensions were very close or identical. A deal was struck and a month later, and about the same $ out of pocket, my bike now has a modern linkage rear suspension. I guess one could now call my bike a Yamahaki Maxima.

Necessity, augmented with some creativity, is the mother of all creations.
16VGTIDave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2013, 05:05 PM   #9
headednw
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Location: Central Florida
Oddometer: 147
Kinda the other Direction ..........complete mutt .....GSXR , Duc , Old Kawi , Bimota , Moto-Martin , off the shelf and fabbed and refabbed bits , S&S etc etc

headednw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2013, 05:34 PM   #10
k-moe
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2012
Oddometer: 2,397
One invaluable source of information on what can fit what are factory parts and service manuals. Long before hot-rodding cars became big business it was common practice to peruse the specifications for different manufacturers to find a hotter cam that could fit into your engine without needing much of a re-work. The same is true of pistons, and even heads. I've seen (but not done myself) tractor restorations that used truck pistons because the next oversize tractor piston was NLA.
k-moe is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 01:19 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014