ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Road warriors
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 04-23-2013, 07:54 AM   #2431
Randy
Beastly Adventurer
 
Randy's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2002
Location: Newnan, GA USA
Oddometer: 2,198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tepi View Post
aaa, yeah that one, its good?

Well, while I haven't compared it to other options, I'm very happy with it. It's a straight bolt on swap for the 48, works with the stock master cylinder, is relatively inexpensive, and substantially improves braking performance. I never feel the need for more than two fingers on the lever now, and I couldn't say that about the stock brakes.

All you need is the caliper (it comes with pads already installed), two sealing washers, and a bottle of brake fluid. Easy peasy. Takes just minutes to swap the calipers. The only time consuming part is bleeding the system. That'd be easier if you also installed a speed bleeder on the caliper and run a hose back up to the master cylinder. Done that way all you have to do is crack the bleeder and keep pumping the lever while letting the fluid return back up to the master cylinder.

I may upgrade the hose to SS braided lines later on, and if I do I'll install a speed bleeder then. But for now I'm pleased.


__________________
"some might call it a 'midlife crisis', I prefer to call it a renaissance of thought and action"... "Life is too short to do anything other than that about which you are absolutely passionate."..."Adventure is a frame of mind, set upon by action, not defined by equipment."..."It all boils down to your ability to say "SCREW IT" and really mean it"....Randy
Randy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2013, 08:17 AM   #2432
Tepi
Studly Adventurer
 
Tepi's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2011
Location: Helsinki/Heinola Finland
Oddometer: 543
Yeah the technical aspect is a piece of cake. though I think the stock caliper works fine too, I've thought about the brembo one. I have one of those vacuum bleeders you attach to an airline from my car days.

You can also get a steering dampener for the forty eight.
Tepi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2013, 08:35 AM   #2433
Randy
Beastly Adventurer
 
Randy's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2002
Location: Newnan, GA USA
Oddometer: 2,198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tepi View Post
Yeah the technical aspect is a piece of cake. though I think the stock caliper works fine too, I've thought about the brembo one. I have one of those vacuum bleeders you attach to an airline from my car days.

You can also get a steering dampener for the forty eight.
Well, IDK, but my stockker was woefully inadequate in my opinion. Perhaps yours is better, but it was the first thing that I did to my bike when I got it. I mean, yeah it "worked", in a '70s sort of way. But the lever effort was too high, and the feel and power was too low. If I'd never ridden a bike with powerful brakes before I guess I wouldn't have known better, but that's not the case and I like a bike with GOOD brakes. This bike didn't have that from the factory, IMO. It still doesn't rival a modern sport bikes, or even an older one, by any stretch of the imagination, but it is MUCH better, and entirely adequate for my needs. For a buck fifty it was well worth every penny.

I have a vacuum bleeder too, and used it when doing the swap. It does work much better than the old fashioned way, but you still have to keep topping off the fluid, and be careful to not suck the master cylinder dry while sucking the fluid out of the caliper. Ask me how I know!

It took a good long time and a lot of refilling the reservoir, and dumping the vacuum pump container, doing it this way.

That's the only real advantage to recirculating it... it just keeps the reservoir full while the air escapes, and lets you just keep pumping and pumping until you've gotten all the air out, while preventing absent minded screw ups.

I don't feel the need for a steering damper on this bike. With the rather lazy steering geometry of these bikes, and unless one were to pretty radically change things up, I can't see that they'd be useful. In fact, IMO, and in most cases, for a street bike I sorta think of steering dampers as bandaid fixes for an improper suspension set-up. I don't ever plan to change the geometry enough, or push this bike hard enough to need one anyway.
__________________
"some might call it a 'midlife crisis', I prefer to call it a renaissance of thought and action"... "Life is too short to do anything other than that about which you are absolutely passionate."..."Adventure is a frame of mind, set upon by action, not defined by equipment."..."It all boils down to your ability to say "SCREW IT" and really mean it"....Randy

Randy screwed with this post 04-23-2013 at 08:56 AM
Randy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2013, 11:37 AM   #2434
Tepi
Studly Adventurer
 
Tepi's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2011
Location: Helsinki/Heinola Finland
Oddometer: 543
Heh, yeah those vacuum bleeders are fast. But for 150bucks the caliper change isnt that bad of an idea. Gotta find out what the calipers cost here. They also sell brembo kits that change both front and rear calipers, but its a bit more than 150.

As for the sportsbikes, well yeah, no contest there, but still the forty eight with its big tires is quite nice to ride here, because the roads are in shit condition after winter. It still has pretty good pull, though it is underpowered and heavy compared to sportsbikes.
Tepi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2013, 03:17 PM   #2435
theKite
Ulyssean
 
theKite's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2010
Location: Little Mountain, Queensland
Oddometer: 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Randy View Post
Well, all good Go Sportsters should be able to stop, right? The stock 48, with its two piston caliper and single sided disc, while it worked ok, did leave a little to be desired. After doing a bit of looking around I decided to try an upgrade that I found on xlforum...

Upgrading the stock two pot to this:



A left side four piston Nissin caliper from an XR1200...

Comes with pads already installed:




AND bolts straight up to the 48 with no other modifications required:



Cost a little over $150 shipped to my door from cyclepartsforless. The caliper, a couple of new sealing washers, some brake fluid and a little time swapping the parts and bleeding the brake system, and VOILA! Much improved brakes!!

I think it looks a little better too...




Not really sure that they do much for actual "Go", but they sure sound better than the stock exhaust... The first thing I did was add this set of Cycle Shack slash cut slip-ons. Then as mentioned earlier in this thread I just didn't care for the forward controls, so I purchased a set of mids for $65 shipped, from a member over on xlforum. Much more natural feeling for me, and I no longer feel like i'm struggling to stay in the seat under hard acceleration or high speeds. Another side benefit was that the change in controls altered my hip postion just enough so that I actually don't find the stock seat uncomfortable any longer.

Just recently swapped out the pegs for the ones seen in the pic above. They ride a little higher, and inward than the originals mounted on the mids, pictured below.



Still up, when funds allow, is a set of ~13.5" Ohlins, longer fork damper rods from the Roadster, Intiminators and fork springs.

Then, I have an NRHS HurricaneFlow filter set-up for it too... Got a good deal on it used from a member here... Just waitin' till I can do something about the fueling before I install it.

Once those things are done I think I'll pretty much be happy with the major "Go" parts.

Also just picked up this never before installed Lick's solo bag for $130 from another member over on xlforum.



Planning a brown leather seat to match at some point down the road, once I figure out exactly what I want and have the cash. SInce discovering that the mid controls makes the stocker fairly comfortable I may just have my stock seat recovered in leather by Roberti. But that's coming after the other stuff anyway...


The brake mod looks good. Mine is a 1200 2004, and after riding the XR some years ago, mine feels distinctly under-braked!
I was intending to fit a second brake disc/caliper as per XR.
So the braking is much improved, Randy? Maybe this is all that I need to do.
Rob
__________________
Photographers seal yesterday for tomorrow.
But bikers LIVE FOR TODAY!
theKite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2013, 03:29 PM   #2436
Tepi
Studly Adventurer
 
Tepi's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2011
Location: Helsinki/Heinola Finland
Oddometer: 543
But damn randy, your front disk has heated up, since its colored up.
Tepi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2013, 03:32 PM   #2437
Randy
Beastly Adventurer
 
Randy's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2002
Location: Newnan, GA USA
Oddometer: 2,198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tepi View Post
But damn randy, your front disk has heated up, since its colored up.

Yeah, it got that way bedding in the new pads. I subscribe to the "transfer pad material to the rotor" method. Got em a little hotter than anticipated, but all seems well now.
__________________
"some might call it a 'midlife crisis', I prefer to call it a renaissance of thought and action"... "Life is too short to do anything other than that about which you are absolutely passionate."..."Adventure is a frame of mind, set upon by action, not defined by equipment."..."It all boils down to your ability to say "SCREW IT" and really mean it"....Randy

Randy screwed with this post 04-23-2013 at 06:39 PM
Randy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2013, 04:04 PM   #2438
Randy
Beastly Adventurer
 
Randy's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2002
Location: Newnan, GA USA
Oddometer: 2,198
Quote:
Originally Posted by theKite View Post
The brake mod looks good. Mine is a 1200 2004, and after riding the XR some years ago, mine feels distinctly under-braked!
I was intending to fit a second brake disc/caliper as per XR.
So the braking is much improved, Randy? Maybe this is all that I need to do.
Rob

"Much improved"? Yes, for sure. Of course that is a very subjective measure. The twin disc/caliper of the XR is, I'm sure vastly superior. But it would be a cheap experiment I guess. If the left side caliper will fit and work with your wheel, you could try it before adding the right side fork lower, disc and caliper. Then if your satisfied you've just saved yourself a bunch of dough and hassle. If not, then you've already got the left side caliper anyway.

__________________
"some might call it a 'midlife crisis', I prefer to call it a renaissance of thought and action"... "Life is too short to do anything other than that about which you are absolutely passionate."..."Adventure is a frame of mind, set upon by action, not defined by equipment."..."It all boils down to your ability to say "SCREW IT" and really mean it"....Randy
Randy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2013, 08:41 AM   #2439
Tepi
Studly Adventurer
 
Tepi's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2011
Location: Helsinki/Heinola Finland
Oddometer: 543
As far as I know the XR forks are different to the XL forks.
Tepi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2013, 09:28 AM   #2440
Randy
Beastly Adventurer
 
Randy's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2002
Location: Newnan, GA USA
Oddometer: 2,198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tepi View Post
As far as I know the XR forks are different to the XL forks.
Yes, the XR forks are very different from the XL forks. In order to mount a right side caliper to an XL, you either have to do a complete front end swap, or in some cases just add a right side fork lower from a model that had a right side caliper, such as a Roadster. Several models with left side only brakes are compatible with the Roadster right side lower. Some, such as the 48, are not, due to the location of the fender mounting lugs. If, for example, you had a model that was compatible with the right side Roadster fork leg though, you could add just the left caliper from the XR, like I did. Then if you still wanted more, you could add the fork lower and the right side caliper, along with the necessary wheel mods to accept the rotor, as well as a new master cylinder that could pump enough fluid to actuate two 4 piston calipers. Doing the twin brake conversion can be a complicated and costly endeavor. That's why I went with the upgrade that I did.

All in all though, I accept some concessions to the fact that I have the bike I have. I wanted it for a different riding style, and with a few upgrades it'll do what I want it to do. If I wanted or needed top level performance a Sportster wouldn't have been the bike I would own.


__________________
"some might call it a 'midlife crisis', I prefer to call it a renaissance of thought and action"... "Life is too short to do anything other than that about which you are absolutely passionate."..."Adventure is a frame of mind, set upon by action, not defined by equipment."..."It all boils down to your ability to say "SCREW IT" and really mean it"....Randy
Randy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2013, 12:31 PM   #2441
jules083
Beastly Adventurer
 
jules083's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2011
Location: Richmond, Ohio
Oddometer: 2,502
Hopefully someone here knows, I haven't found anything on this. I have a 1999 883 custom. It has the shorter rear shocks from the factory. Do I have the standard length forks, or the short ones like on the 'hugger' model? I'm looking into putting road king shocks on it, but I can't find out if I need to change forks or anything.

Thanks.

All typos and misspellings blamed on my phone.
jules083 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2013, 12:39 PM   #2442
Randy
Beastly Adventurer
 
Randy's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2002
Location: Newnan, GA USA
Oddometer: 2,198
Quote:
Originally Posted by jules083 View Post
Hopefully someone here knows, I haven't found anything on this. I have a 1999 883 custom. It has the shorter rear shocks from the factory. Do I have the standard length forks, or the short ones like on the 'hugger' model? I'm looking into putting road king shocks on it, but I can't find out if I need to change forks or anything.

Thanks.

All typos and misspellings blamed on my phone.
I can't say for sure, but I believe that the Custom had the long forks and short shocks for that "raked out" look. I mknow that the later rubber mount Customs had the same longer forks as the Roadster, but I'm not up on the rigids. Measure the fork tubes from the top of the cap to the dust cover. I believe the longer forks should measure somewhere in the range of 15" when fully extended.
__________________
"some might call it a 'midlife crisis', I prefer to call it a renaissance of thought and action"... "Life is too short to do anything other than that about which you are absolutely passionate."..."Adventure is a frame of mind, set upon by action, not defined by equipment."..."It all boils down to your ability to say "SCREW IT" and really mean it"....Randy
Randy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2013, 01:24 PM   #2443
jules083
Beastly Adventurer
 
jules083's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2011
Location: Richmond, Ohio
Oddometer: 2,502
Quote:
Originally Posted by Randy View Post
I can't say for sure, but I believe that the Custom had the long forks and short shocks for that "raked out" look. I mknow that the later rubber mount Customs had the same longer forks as the Roadster, but I'm not up on the rigids. Measure the fork tubes from the top of the cap to the dust cover. I believe the longer forks should measure somewhere in the range of 15" when fully extended.
Awesome, thanks. Makes sense, that explains the heavy handling.

Once I get the rk shocks on I'm pretty well happy with the bike I think. I don't want to mess with it too much, its reliable and everything works as intended. Just want to quicken up the handling and get a bit better ride. It blows through the travel pretty quick on bumps.

All typos and misspellings blamed on my phone.
jules083 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2013, 01:36 PM   #2444
wrecked'em
satisfied enzyte user
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Location: n.o. la.
Oddometer: 425
female friend of mine wants a bike and a Harley is the only thing that she can really fit on. on some other sites ive seen where they installed buell front forks. lowers it even more and helps handling a lot.
shes looking at a 2008 1200 r model now. putting 17 inch wheels on both ends would be awesome.
__________________
tiger 1050
wrecked'em is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2013, 01:53 PM   #2445
Randy
Beastly Adventurer
 
Randy's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2002
Location: Newnan, GA USA
Oddometer: 2,198
Quote:
Originally Posted by wrecked'em View Post
female friend of mine wants a bike and a Harley is the only thing that she can really fit on. on some other sites ive seen where they installed buell front forks. lowers it even more and helps handling a lot.
shes looking at a 2008 1200 r model now. putting 17 inch wheels on both ends would be awesome.
You're not going to get much lower than the current crop of Sportsters. If you do, it'll ride worse than my 48 and that means like total crap! I'm not familiar with Buell front ends being used for lowering purposes. The only thing I've seen them used for was to gain higher quality forks and brakes for better handling and increased braking performance, but I suppose with certain modifications it might be possible to use them to lower a bike.

If not interested in ride quality or cornering clearance, it would be relatively cheap to lower that Roadster. Bout all you need is a set of damper rods, a pair of shocks, and a sidestand from a 48. Then with a lower seat, she'd be looking at a seat height 2-3 inches lower.

I'm going the opposite route with my 48 by adding parts to bring the suspension travel back up to that of the Roadster. More travel = better ride quality and cornering clearance.
__________________
"some might call it a 'midlife crisis', I prefer to call it a renaissance of thought and action"... "Life is too short to do anything other than that about which you are absolutely passionate."..."Adventure is a frame of mind, set upon by action, not defined by equipment."..."It all boils down to your ability to say "SCREW IT" and really mean it"....Randy
Randy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 05:58 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014