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Old 05-01-2013, 08:21 AM   #16861
Yankee Dog
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mercury264 View Post
It's only significantly tighter if you adjust it to the specs which states it is to be adjusted on the side-stand.

You can adjust a chain on the center OR side stand and it be in spec, you just have to be aware of the procedure. It's poppcock to say you can't adjust the chain on the center stand - that's how I've always done it.

On a related note, I'll take a slightly loose chain over a tight one any day...
Take a chill pill my friend. I was only answering the gentlemens question. I never said one shouldnt take your most accurate advice. I only said there was indeed a difference.

I also agree that it is best to run a chain on the loose side.
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Old 05-01-2013, 09:21 AM   #16862
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While on the subject of chain adjustment, has anyone noticed their adjustment blocks on the swingarm not being symmetrical? I had the back wheel off the other weekend to put new tires on, and when we were getting everything reinstalled, my buddy noticed that the adjuster blocks were significantly different in their position on the swingarm.

On the left side, you can see that the block is just a couple millimeters from the end of the swingarm:


Whereas on the right side, there's a good half inch from the end of the swingarm:



We measured the axle to swingarm pivot over and over, and everything seems to be correct there, but it seems weird that they'd be spaced so differently.
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Old 05-01-2013, 09:29 AM   #16863
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Originally Posted by Yankee Dog View Post
I am speaking from experience. The chain is significantly tighter when adjusted on the center stand.

.
OK. Then there appears to be a difference between the Roadie (or at least my bike with -2 in the back plus lifting links) and the XC.

FWIW, I am fully aware of how to adjust my chain etc... I was just interested in this data point for the XC.
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Old 05-01-2013, 09:29 AM   #16864
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I go by the indicator dots. Appears to be perfectly aligned. No bad manners, no vibes, nada.
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Old 05-01-2013, 09:31 AM   #16865
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Quote:
Originally Posted by some call me...tim View Post
While on the subject of chain adjustment, has anyone noticed their adjustment blocks on the swingarm not being symmetrical? I had the back wheel off the other weekend to put new tires on, and when we were getting everything reinstalled, my buddy noticed that the adjuster blocks were significantly different in their position on the swingarm.

On the left side, you can see that the block is just a couple millimeters from the end of the swingarm:


We measured the axle to swingarm pivot over and over, and everything seems to be correct there, but it seems weird that they'd be spaced so differently.
I gotta think you've got it adjusted correctly (properly aligned) as you'd have to try to have it that far out of whack. My bike is not like that.
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Old 05-01-2013, 10:34 AM   #16866
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One word for anyone having trouble adjusting their chain, shaft. Go buy an Explorer or Tenere or GS. I used to be a shaft only kind of guy, hated chains. BUT my wife has only ever ridden chain driven bikes, SO I was stuck with chain maintenance anyway. I realized a few years ago that it really doesn't matter what drive a bike uses, I just buy the bike that I want to ride. And modern chains are pretty damn easy to maintain.

I do as a few have suggested. Adjust on the side stand, put it back on the center stand and re-measure so I know where to adjust to next time. Also check the frame alignment notches or detents on a new bike to see if they're accurate.

Best way to check tension is as one poster mentioned, line up the axle, swingarm pivot, and front sprocket. Use a tie down over the seat to the swingarm. Once they are in line you should have just a slight bit of slack, about 1/2" is plenty as the chain can never get any tighter at that point. Release the tie strap and then put your bike on the side stand, center stand, whichever you prefer and use that as your chain tension.

On our sons dirt bikes we just used four fingers between swingarm and chain, now those were run loose.



How to do it with pretty pictures...
http://www.easterndirt.com/?p=207

Great tip at the end for making a small wooden chain tension tester.


bross screwed with this post 05-01-2013 at 10:41 AM
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Old 05-01-2013, 11:10 AM   #16867
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Quote:
Originally Posted by some call me...tim View Post
While on the subject of chain adjustment, has anyone noticed their adjustment blocks on the swingarm not being symmetrical? I had the back wheel off the other weekend to put new tires on, and when we were getting everything reinstalled, my buddy noticed that the adjuster blocks were significantly different in their position on the swingarm.

On the left side, you can see that the block is just a couple millimeters from the end of the swingarm:


Whereas on the right side, there's a good half inch from the end of the swingarm:



We measured the axle to swingarm pivot over and over, and everything seems to be correct there, but it seems weird that they'd be spaced so differently.
I'm not at home so I can't look at mine but is there a chance you have one of those blocks upside down? I had the dealer put mine on upside down last year and I had to fix it when I got home. You can't see the marks if it is upside down. Just a thought.
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Old 05-01-2013, 11:47 AM   #16868
some call me...tim
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Originally Posted by SMIFFXC View Post
I'm not at home so I can't look at mine but is there a chance you have one of those blocks upside down? I had the dealer put mine on upside down last year and I had to fix it when I got home. You can't see the marks if it is upside down. Just a thought.
Hmm, considering I didn't realize there was even an upside down, that's entirely possible. I'll have to take a look later, thanks for the advice.
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Old 05-01-2013, 01:35 PM   #16869
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. I realized a few years ago that it really doesn't matter what drive a bike uses, I just buy the bike that I want to ride. And modern chains are pretty damn easy to maintain.

And while I know it's not a very popular solution for whatever reason, if you install a Pro-Oiler and set it up and use it correctly your chain adjustment become pretty much non-existent. Mine gets adjusted when the wheel comes off for tire replacement which is about every 10-14k miles.
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Old 05-01-2013, 02:17 PM   #16870
T
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SMIFFXC View Post
I'm not at home so I can't look at mine but is there a chance you have one of those blocks upside down? I had the dealer put mine on upside down last year and I had to fix it when I got home. You can't see the marks if it is upside down. Just a thought.
Quote:
Originally Posted by some call me...tim View Post
Hmm, considering I didn't realize there was even an upside down, that's entirely possible. I'll have to take a look later, thanks for the advice.
Yep. Left side is up side down. Won't hurt anything since the chain tension adjusting bolts keep the alignment.. Just change it the next time you have the axle nut off.

Right Side



Left Side



Pics make it look out of alignment but in reality it's good.
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Old 05-01-2013, 02:31 PM   #16871
bross
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And while I know it's not a very popular solution for whatever reason, if you install a Pro-Oiler and set it up and use it correctly your chain adjustment become pretty much non-existent. Mine gets adjusted when the wheel comes off for tire replacement which is about every 10-14k miles.
Tried a ScottOiler on two of my bikes and didn't like them. Sure they kept the chain lubed but they flung gunk everywhere even though they were adjusted for proper flow, one to two drops a minute. And I think I spent more time trying to keep the tube end hitting the chain / sprockets than I ever have lubing a chain. More trouble than they're worth to me. Lubing isn't a chore and takes 5 minutes for both bikes on a trip so yeah I just don't worry about it.
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Old 05-01-2013, 03:32 PM   #16872
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Tried a ScottOiler on two of my bikes and didn't like them. Sure they kept the chain lubed but they flung gunk everywhere even though they were adjusted for proper flow, one to two drops a minute. And I think I spent more time trying to keep the tube end hitting the chain / sprockets than I ever have lubing a chain. More trouble than they're worth to me. Lubing isn't a chore and takes 5 minutes for both bikes on a trip so yeah I just don't worry about it.
Understand your frustration with the Scott Oiler. I was referring to the Pro-Oiler though. Very different.
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Old 05-01-2013, 03:50 PM   #16873
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Oiler???

I have a mini can of PJ1 in the top box.
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Old 05-01-2013, 03:56 PM   #16874
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Front wheel hop?

BTW, I put my road tires back on the bike, the trails that came with it, they're such a great tire for mostly road.

Did a mountain trip last weekend, couple'a hundred miles, and was getting the dreaded wheel hop out front. Leaned over at 30 or so it was pretty noticeable.

So when I got home I got my spoke wrench back out as I had "tuned" all the spokes when I did the tire change and thought maybe I had pulled the front rim out of true. Nope, not a waiver, nothing, nada. Tire is true, really close in balance (static).

Then I grabbed the fork legs at the bottom to check the head bearings and found quite a bit of play. Pulled off the top clamp and tightened the nuts and the play went away. Seems I have no more wheel hop now. Keep an eye on those head bearings. About 6K miles on the bike.
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Old 05-02-2013, 04:20 AM   #16875
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bross View Post
Tried a ScottOiler on two of my bikes and didn't like them. Sure they kept the chain lubed but they flung gunk everywhere even though they were adjusted for proper flow, one to two drops a minute. And I think I spent more time trying to keep the tube end hitting the chain / sprockets than I ever have lubing a chain. More trouble than they're worth to me. Lubing isn't a chore and takes 5 minutes for both bikes on a trip so yeah I just don't worry about it.
Lets not get into another Scottoiler debate but I'll just say this:-
A Scottoiler lubricates for the whole of your journey whereas a spray lube just lubricates at the beginning, until it gets washed off or flings off. Also that constant drip of oil helps keep the chain cool so the internal grease doesn't melt and flow past the seals which is probably most of the reason chains last longer with a Scottoiler.
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