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Old 01-25-2012, 11:42 AM   #256
ragtoplvr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by McNeal View Post
Another big issue was the decision by Robert McNamara to require Lockheed to destroy all of the jigs and tools used to fabricate the plan.
This was to reduce the motivation of Russia to design missiles that could bring down the plane. They could them sell them to their allies, and the SR71 would have limited value. Russia was scared for good reason of a fighter interceptor version. Cold war politics.

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Old 04-30-2013, 09:07 PM   #257
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How slow can the SR-71 Blackbird fly?

Brian Shul, Retired SR-71 Pilot:

As a former SR-71 pilot, and a professional keynote speaker, the question I'm most often asked is "How fast would that SR-71 fly?" I can be assured of hearing that question several times at any event I attend. It's an interesting question, given the aircraft's proclivity for speed, but there really isn't one number to give, as the jet would always give you a little more speed if you wanted it to. It was common to see 35 miles a minute. Because we flew a programmed Mach number on most missions, and never wanted to harm the plane in any way, we never let it run out to any limits of temperature or speed. Thus, each SR-71 pilot had his own individual “high” speed that he saw at some point on some mission. I saw mine over Libya when Khadafy fired two missiles my way, and max power was in order. Let’s just say that the plane truly loved speed and effortlessly took us to Mach numbers we hadn’t previously seen.


So it was with great surprise, when at the end of one of my presentations, someone asked, “what was the slowest you ever flew the Blackbird?” This was a first. After giving it some thought, I was reminded of a story that I had never shared before, and relayed the following.
I was flying the SR-71 out of RAF Mildenhall, England, with my back-seater, Walt Watson; we were returning from a mission over Europe and the Iron Curtain when we received a radio transmission from home base. As we scooted across Denmark in three minutes, we learned that a small RAF base in the English countryside had requested an SR-71 fly-past. The air cadet commander there was a former Blackbird pilot, and thought it would be a motivating moment for the young lads to see the mighty SR-71 perform a low approach. No problem, we were happy to do it. After a quick aerial refueling over the North Sea, we proceeded to find the small airfield.


Walter had a myriad of sophisticated navigation equipment in the back seat, and began to vector me toward the field. Descending to subsonic speeds, we found ourselves over a densely wooded area in a slight haze. Like most former WWII British airfields, the one we were looking for had a small tower and little surrounding infrastructure. Walter told me we were close and that I should be able to see the field, but I saw nothing.


Nothing but trees as far as I could see in the haze. We got a little lower, and I pulled the throttles back from 325 knots we were at. With the gear up, anything under 275 was just uncomfortable. Walt said we were practically over the field—yet; there was nothing in my windscreen. I banked the jet and started a gentle circling maneuver in hopes of picking up anything that looked like a field. Meanwhile, below, the cadet commander had taken the cadets up on the catwalk of the tower in order to get a prime view of the fly-past. It was a quiet, still day with no wind and partial gray overcast.


Walter continued to give me indications that the field should be below us but in the overcast and haze, I couldn't see it. The longer we continued to peer out the window and circle, the slower we got. With our power back, the awaiting cadets heard nothing. I must have had good instructors in my flying career, as something told me I better cross-check the gauges. As I noticed the airspeed indicator slide below 160 knots, my heart stopped and my adrenalin-filled left hand pushed two throttles full forward. At this point we weren't really flying, but were falling in a slight bank. Just at the moment that both afterburners lit with a thunderous roar of flame (and what a joyous feeling that was) the aircraft fell into full view of the shocked observers on the tower. Shattering the still quiet of that morning, they now had 107 feet of fire-breathing titanium in their face as the plane leveled and accelerated, in full burner, on the tower side of the infield, closer than expected, maintaining what could only be described as some sort of ultimate knife-edge pass.
Quickly reaching the field boundary, we proceeded back to Mildenhall without incident. We didn't say a word for those next 14 minutes.
After landing, our commander greeted us, and we were both certain he was reaching for our wings. Instead, he heartily shook our hands and said the commander had told him it was the greatest SR-71 fly-past he had ever seen, especially how we had surprised them with such a precise maneuver that could only be described as breathtaking. He said that some of the cadet’s hats were blown off and the sight of the plan form of the plane in full afterburner dropping right in front of them was unbelievable. Walt and I both understood the concept of “breathtaking” very well that morning, and sheepishly replied that they were just excited to see our low approach.
As we retired to the equipment room to change from space suits to flight suits, we just sat there-we hadn't spoken a word since “the pass.” Finally, Walter looked at me and said, “One hundred fifty-six knots.
What did you see?” Trying to find my voice, I stammered, “One hundred fifty-two.” We sat in silence for a moment. Then Walt said, “Don’t ever do that to me again!” And I never did.


A year later, Walter and I were having lunch in the Mildenhall Officer’s club, and overheard an officer talking to some cadets about an SR-71 fly-past that he had seen one day. Of course, by now the story included kids falling off the tower and screaming as the heat of the jet singed their eyebrows. Noticing our HABU patches, as we stood there with lunch trays in our hands, he asked us to verify to the cadets that such a thing had occurred. Walt just shook his head and said, “It was probably just a routine low approach; they're pretty impressive in that plane.” Impressive indeed.


Little did I realize after relaying this experience to my audience that day that it would become one of the most popular and most requested stories. It’s ironic that people are interested in how slow the world’s fastest jet can fly. Regardless of your speed, however, it’s always a good idea to keep that cross-check up…and keep your Mach up, too

http://www.pirep.org/forum/viewtopic.php?p=35804
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Old 05-01-2013, 12:32 PM   #258
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M-21

[QUOTE=guns_equal_freedom;6786964]The Habu at the Boeing Museum of Flight is the sole remaining M-21, not an A-12 and not an SR-71, and it has the D-21 drone mated to it.

Anyone have more information on the M-21? How the D-21 Drone was used? Engine? etc

Edit: Found This http://roadrunnersinternationale.com/m21_story.html

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Old 05-01-2013, 01:21 PM   #259
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guns_equal_freedom View Post
The Habu at the Boeing Museum of Flight is the sole remaining M-21, not an A-12 and not an SR-71, and it has the D-21 drone mated to it.

Anyone have more information on the M-21? How the D-21 Drone was used? Engine? etc

Edit: Found This http://roadrunnersinternationale.com/m21_story.html
Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lockheed_D-21
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Old 05-01-2013, 09:31 PM   #260
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Here's period video footage of the accident that ended the M-21 / D-21 program:




edit: embed doesn't seem to be working... http://youtu.be/Aw_YzmkiKC8

Kelly Johnson decided it was no longer worth the risk. Subsequent D-21 missions were launched from the wings of B-52's
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Old 05-02-2013, 08:22 PM   #261
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I was an avionics tech with the 9th SRW from 1978 to 1981 and the an instructor from 1985 to 1987. One of the best gigs in the Air force at that time. Beale was a VIP show stop and everything there was top shelf.
There were SR-71s, U-2/TR-1s, T-38s and KC-135Qs. Q model tankers were fitted with boom interphone for radio free communication after hook up, secure comm/nav and of course a belly full of JP-7. They always flew in pairs so if one aborted there was always a backup. The squadron of T-38s allowed the sled drivers to keep their flying hours up because there was only one, sometimes two SR sorties a day flown out of Beale.
U-2s are also impressive in their own way. Elegant and simple. The opposite and compliment of the SR. As a maintainer I preferred the Dragonlady.
The 9th was a very close-knit group of people and I had some of the best times of my life while associated.
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Old 05-02-2013, 09:45 PM   #262
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was bored and found this, thank you all for posting, amazing. I always wanted to fly. my mom's uncle flew in ww2, korea and nam he passed away 2 years ago, he drove like a 30 year cop at 94 years old. I saw picture of him and the b-58 hustler he flew and always wanted to do that but I became friends booze instead. btw we are no longer friends
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Old 05-11-2013, 06:52 PM   #263
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Awesome.








Just PURE SEXY.
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Old 05-12-2013, 10:12 AM   #264
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As a youngster becoming enamored of aircraft when I first saw the SR71 I thought to myself or somehow had the impression made on me; "we'll win".
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Old 05-13-2013, 06:39 AM   #265
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The SR-71 flew out of RAF Lakenheath for a few months in the mid 80s while the runway at Mildenhall was repaired.

We would head to EOR after roll call every morning just to watch them takeoff. The max climbs we saw were better than anything I ever saw at an airshow. What an awesome plane!
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Old 07-15-2013, 09:03 AM   #266
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A good read from a former pilot:

http://www.bbc.com/future/story/2013...bird-cockpit/1
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Old 11-05-2013, 01:36 PM   #267
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The SR-72 will have about the same range and be around the same size as the SR-71, but it will cruise at Mach 6, or twice as fast.






http://www.nbcnews.com/science/son-b...spy-8C11528419
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Old 11-05-2013, 01:46 PM   #268
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The one announced is simply to deflect interest from the one they already have. Google Aurora spy plane

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Old 11-05-2013, 02:04 PM   #269
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Originally Posted by ragtoplvr View Post
The one announced is simply to deflect interest from the one they already have. Google Aurora spy plane

Rod
Gosh, I wonder how they managed to leapfrog the X-51A and acquire hypersonic capability that is only just now being attained. I wonder why they're still working on it. Never heard of Aurora, either.
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Old 11-05-2013, 02:25 PM   #270
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Originally Posted by Klay View Post
Gosh, I wonder how they managed to leapfrog the X-51A and acquire hypersonic capability that is only just now being attained. I wonder why they're still working on it. Never heard of Aurora, either.
Aurora's been rumored for years. I've kind of started doubting its existence, figured we would have actually seen one by now. I'm not on the need to know list though.

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