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Old 05-06-2013, 10:36 AM   #31
seniorasi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LoJack View Post
Every carpenter I know uses a Makita impact driver, so I got one a few years. It's incredibly handy. Having the little spot light that comes on when you hit the trigger is nice, too.
Oh...a palm nailer! Gotcha! Different parts of the country terminology. I try to use an air driven framing nailer wherever possible; it is so much quicker.
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Old 05-06-2013, 11:44 AM   #32
JimVonBaden
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seniorasi View Post
Oh...a palm nailer! Gotcha! Different parts of the country terminology. I try to use an air driven framing nailer wherever possible; it is so much quicker.
Not a palm nailer. It is a dedicated electric screwdriver that uses impact to driver in the screw without stripping the head. This impack gun for tire wheels, but smaller.



http://news.thomasnet.com/fullstory/...-torque-540115

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Old 05-06-2013, 02:04 PM   #33
zap2504
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Recommended forums:
Fine Homebuilding magazine http://www.finehomebuilding.com/

Green Building Advisor (especially useful for learning about modern building science - air/vapor/thermal control) http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/

Building Science Corp. (one of the most influential/respected sources of modern building science - huge repository under "Information") http://www.buildingscience.com/

If you will be dealing with crawlspaces (good info for rubble stone foundations/earth floors too) http://crawlspaces.org/

I also have an old house (1930s) and am in the same camp as the above - too much work; too many inherent restrictions. But as an energy auditor I also see all sorts of more modern shoddy work - even brand new stuff. Most housing in the USA are "code" houses - houses built to pass whatever building codes are in force at that time. Code = the absolute minimum quality that is allowed by law. Much better building science/construction methods exist but most builders do not use them nor even offer them to customers; most tradespeople have no clue, don't want a clue, and get their jobs done as fast and cheap as possible.

Your job is to learn as much about building science as you can and implement the technology in your retrofit.
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Old 05-06-2013, 03:01 PM   #34
tvpierce
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Ever hear the saying, "The only thing that works in an old house is the owner!"

Mine's practically a new-build: only 100 years old.
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Old 05-06-2013, 04:08 PM   #35
small_e_900
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By US standards, my house is pretty old. c1790.

A stone foundation means that some doors won't stay open in the winter and some won't stay open in the summer.

The day I stop working on it will be the day I die.
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Old 05-06-2013, 06:46 PM   #36
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old house

The basement is an old laid stone / dirt pile foundation.
It's settle a bit, and some of the floors are a bit slanty.
Mrs. wants me to get on this one pretty quick too I think.
It effects the 1st to 2nd floor stairs and that's her biggest qualm.



I have a foundation like that, it's good at keeping the larger water molecules out!! And the slanty floors are fun for the kids Hot wheels cars!
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Old 05-06-2013, 06:57 PM   #37
wheatfly
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Makes my 1947 house seem like a baby. Still a long way to go but we are working on it slowly....... tons of pictures and such on our blog. It was vacant for about 5 years before we bought it and in the same family since the late 60s.

I believe it to be true that there are some things cheaper and work out better to pay someone but I continually have trouble applying that even though I know it.

http://www.greystonecottage.blogspot.com/
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Old 05-06-2013, 07:47 PM   #38
LoJack
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimVonBaden View Post
Not a palm nailer. It is a dedicated electric screwdriver that uses impact to driver in the screw without stripping the head. This impack gun for tire wheels, but smaller.



http://news.thomasnet.com/fullstory/...-torque-540115

Jim
Yeah, that's pretty much it. It works really well with paddle bits, too.
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Old 05-07-2013, 02:05 AM   #39
seniorasi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimVonBaden View Post
Not a palm nailer. It is a dedicated electric screwdriver that uses impact to driver in the screw without stripping the head. This impack gun for tire wheels, but smaller.



http://news.thomasnet.com/fullstory/...-torque-540115

Jim
Each to their own! I started using screw guns working in a cabinet shop while in college. The Makita 9V was the first one that was worth a hoot. Since then I've burned up a bunch. I currently use the 18V DeWalt. Awesome screw gun! Not certain I'd like the "impact" version after using the old school gun.
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Old 05-07-2013, 02:57 AM   #40
Bloodweiser OP
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The house is in Chatham NY.

I've been a tool horder since I was 11 or 12,
am looking forward to more excuses to buy more tools.
but I already have an impact driver.

Had the appraisal yesterday morning.
My agent said it went ok,
I don't know what that means
but I think we'll be closing soon.

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Old 05-07-2013, 04:43 AM   #41
JimVonBaden
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seniorasi View Post
Each to their own! I started using screw guns working in a cabinet shop while in college. The Makita 9V was the first one that was worth a hoot. Since then I've burned up a bunch. I currently use the 18V DeWalt. Awesome screw gun! Not certain I'd like the "impact" version after using the old school gun.
Man I used to think the same thing, until I used one. MUCH easier to use, far fewer stripped heads, and easier on the wrist.

Jim
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Old 05-07-2013, 12:45 PM   #42
H96669
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seniorasi View Post
Each to their own! I started using screw guns working in a cabinet shop while in college. The Makita 9V was the first one that was worth a hoot. Since then I've burned up a bunch. I currently use the 18V DeWalt. Awesome screw gun! Not certain I'd like the "impact" version after using the old school gun.
Impact works very well thank you when you screw 5-6" deck screws in very old Douglas Fir.Contrary to the advice from the Home Creepo staff...5-6" deck screws do exist. I should have bought one before if just to restore my very old pioneer log cabin and jack up the neighbor also very old house. Both built with Douglas Fir....stuff is hard as nails after 100 years.

I think the PO will have to learn to pull old large nails out of old growth lumber first before he gets to the screwing.

My best nail puller is over 100 years old.Been used a lot over the last 10 years but contrary to most here, I restored my house for very cheap, something comforting I guess hunting materials at the used building supply stores and using very old tools to do them jobs and then relearning them old skills. Table saw???....that's a requirement mine is over 50 years old.Thanks Grandpa and all them old school tradesmen/carpenters I worked with at a young age.
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Old 05-07-2013, 01:10 PM   #43
perterra
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I bought one built late 1880's or 90's. You can follow the history of technology when you start crawling around over and under it. The attic half room had naked wire on insulators when I bought it and the sewer pipes were insulated with newspapers from 1922.

Dont be a perfectionist, it will just cause you pain, but do things right. Trust me you will pay for your short cuts in reworks. Been here for 30 years and the only thing I hired done was the roof. If your experience is like mine, you will find no plumb lines, none of the joist will be evenly spaced, but you will have a house with serious character. Congrats and enjoy

By the way, you dont have to have the very best tools to get the job done, good ones yes, but cheap tools that are well built will get the job done. I went thru a Dewalk and a Swiss made Bosch in about 5 years, my wife brought home a cheap ass Ryobi screw gun because she couldnt find a battery for the Bosch and the damn thing has been plugging along for 12 years now.
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Old 05-08-2013, 02:42 AM   #44
seniorasi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimVonBaden View Post
Man I used to think the same thing, until I used one. MUCH easier to use, far fewer stripped heads, and easier on the wrist.

Jim
I may have to try it next time I buy one. Thanks for the tip.
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Old 05-08-2013, 09:08 AM   #45
gloud
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Mine is 1796. Likely you will have chestnut beams in it. you will not be able to drive a nail in them. (with a nail gun you can shoot them around to room too! )
I would have not voluntarily bought this house but it was next to mom and dad so I could take care of them and it was grams house. I have been working on it for the last 15 years. Good luck.. You will likely need it.
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