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Old 06-13-2013, 08:45 AM   #31
bradluke0
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Hi all ! Some great feedback here . I think another thing to remember is a motorcycle clutch is different than a car clutch . They are built for abuse and designed to help control the power to the rear wheel . This is especially true off road . Using the clutch on a street bike is useful when turning in tight places , makes it alot smoother on a bike with a "loose" drivetrain . I abuse my clutch alot when dualsporting , it is only about $100 to replace and I do my myself .
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Old 06-15-2013, 04:37 AM   #32
RTLover
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Originally Posted by bradluke0 View Post
Hi all ! Proficiency is a great thing......in the real world however , we are not perfect and by using the engine to slow down just magnifies any mistakes . Just remember we are not as great a rider as you .
You crest a hill on a twisty road and start to descend. You're in sixth. It's a long downhill. Do you stay in sixth all the way down and use only the brakes for adjusting the speed?

Please explain the '...by using the engine to slow down just magnifies any mistakes' comment.
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Old 06-15-2013, 07:44 AM   #33
lnewqban
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bradluke0 View Post
Hi all ! Some great feedback here . I think another thing to remember is a motorcycle clutch is different than a car clutch . They are built for abuse and designed to help control the power to the rear wheel . This is especially true off road . Using the clutch on a street bike is useful when turning in tight places , makes it alot smoother on a bike with a "loose" drivetrain . I abuse my clutch alot when dualsporting , it is only about $100 to replace and I do my myself .
Very true!
That is why I cannot understand why so many riders perform clutch-less gear shifting.
The clutch is robust and introduces flexibility in the engine-wheel connection and is our best friend.
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Old 06-16-2013, 10:37 AM   #34
bradluke0
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Hi all ! You guys are still confused regarding using the engine to slow down and using the engine to control your speed on a long downhill . It's not complicated . It's two separate things . Let's try this ....you are on a flat road and you approach a curve in sixth gear . So I pull in my clutch , shift into fifth ,let the clutch out , pull the clutch back in again , shift into fourth , let the clutch back out , pull the clutch in again , shift into third , let the clutch back out ( braking the whole time) and turn the corner . No , no , no and no . Sound dumb because it is . Hope this helps clarify .
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Old 06-21-2013, 12:15 AM   #35
RTLover
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bradluke0 View Post
Hi all ! You guys are still confused regarding using the engine to slow down and using the engine to control your speed on a long downhill . It's not complicated . It's two separate things . Let's try this ....you are on a flat road and you approach a curve in sixth gear . So I pull in my clutch , shift into fifth ,let the clutch out , pull the clutch back in again , shift into fourth , let the clutch back out , pull the clutch in again , shift into third , let the clutch back out ( braking the whole time) and turn the corner . No , no , no and no . Sound dumb because it is . Hope this helps clarify .
Now you can respond to my other query, if it isn't too much for ya.
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Old 06-21-2013, 07:39 PM   #36
bradluke0
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Hi all ! " by using the engine to slow down just magnifies any mistakes " That is very simple.....if you are braking hard for a corner almost all of your weight is on the front tire . Almost always I use both brakes . If you are using alot of front brake and 10 % or so back brake and you downshift you have a good chance of skidding the rear tire . If you start skidding the rear tire with just the rear brake , it is not as serious as skidding it by doing two things at one time . There is more than one way to skin a cat so do it whichever way you want . Don't want to joust back and forth just trying to give another point of view , maybe it will help someone . Hope everyone has a great weekend !
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Old 06-25-2013, 01:37 AM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bradluke0 View Post
Hi all ! " by using the engine to slow down just magnifies any mistakes " That is very simple.....if you are braking hard for a corner almost all of your weight is on the front tire . Almost always I use both brakes . If you are using alot of front brake and 10 % or so back brake and you downshift you have a good chance of skidding the rear tire . If you start skidding the rear tire with just the rear brake , it is not as serious as skidding it by doing two things at one time . There is more than one way to skin a cat so do it whichever way you want . Don't want to joust back and forth just trying to give another point of view , maybe it will help someone . Hope everyone has a great weekend !
Not sure I agree with this... I am not sure if you are suggesting to use only or mostly the rear brake????? If that is your suggestion, it is a bad one.

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Old 06-25-2013, 08:36 AM   #38
bradluke0
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Hi all ! Reread my post......I am suggesting being hard on the front brake and possibly skidding the rear tire by downshifting and using the rear brake at the same time . Just to be clear , what I do is hold the throttle partially open , clutch in and click down the appropriate number of gears ( while using both brakes) and then letting clutch out slowly to match road and engine speed . Kinda like heeling and toeing in a car .
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Old 06-25-2013, 05:02 PM   #39
Barry
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bradluke0 View Post
Hi all ! Reread my post......I am suggesting being hard on the front brake and possibly skidding the rear tire by downshifting and using the rear brake at the same time . Just to be clear , what I do is hold the throttle partially open , clutch in and click down the appropriate number of gears ( while using both brakes) and then letting clutch out slowly to match road and engine speed . Kinda like heeling and toeing in a car .
Makes sense...
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Old 06-25-2013, 10:41 PM   #40
PalePhase
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bradluke0 View Post
Hi all ! Reread my post......I am suggesting being hard on the front brake and possibly skidding the rear tire by downshifting and using the rear brake at the same time . Just to be clear , what I do is hold the throttle partially open , clutch in and click down the appropriate number of gears ( while using both brakes) and then letting clutch out slowly to match road and engine speed . Kinda like heeling and toeing in a car .
^ That is what I do and as long as you don't take too long to let out the clutch, it is very smooth and drama-free.

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PalePhase screwed with this post 06-25-2013 at 11:06 PM
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