ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Trials
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 06-17-2013, 01:50 PM   #16
laser17
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Location: Boston,Massachusetts
Oddometer: 665
Quote:
Originally Posted by motojunky View Post
Just for you... you've seen bad log crossings... now get ready for bad turning. I took this over the winter on a greasy, leaf & root covered hillside in my yard.

I originally bought the trials bike to ride in my yard, 'cause I was tired of driving several hours to ride my dirt bike. After a lot of peer pressure (abuse?) here, I finally went to an event to check it out. I had a great time and met some great people. Now I drive several hours every few weeks to events. So much for not driving to ride. I also ride ~ once a week at home. I went from riding my dirt bike 4-5 times a year to riding my trials bike 4-5 times per month. Good stuff!

Thanks MJ - Im honored. looks like a good practice spot.
laser17 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2013, 02:36 PM   #17
Twin-shocker
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jan 2012
Oddometer: 1,673
If you have read the book, then try and practice the basic techniques repeatedly till you ride that way without thinking. A very good exercise for beginners is full lock turns, going to the other lock after going 360 degrees. Try this first on level flat ground, then introduce some slopes or easy obstacles.

That will help a lot with turning obviously, but also throttle and clutch control. At first it will seem a bit difficult, but after a while it will be much easier, and thats the time to introduce some slopes or obstacles.
Twin-shocker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2013, 07:26 PM   #18
motojunky OP
Professional Idiot
 
motojunky's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Location: North East, MD
Oddometer: 1,068
Quote:
Originally Posted by Twin-shocker View Post
Something thats worth while doing to improve your bike at very little cost, and will help your riding, is to fit a fast action throttle (white throttle tube) if you dont have one already.
This seems contradictory to your usual advice that a smaller bike is better for beginners. It seems to me that softening the hit for newer riders would make sense. Please explain why a fast throttle tube would be a benefit to a new rider.
motojunky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2013, 11:02 PM   #19
Twin-shocker
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jan 2012
Oddometer: 1,673
Quote:
Originally Posted by motojunky View Post
This seems contradictory to your usual advice that a smaller bike is better for beginners. It seems to me that softening the hit for newer riders would make sense. Please explain why a fast throttle tube would be a benefit to a new rider.
Trials is all about reaction.............the slow action throttle slows down the time it takes for the rear wheel to react to movement of the throttle grip. Fast throttles are very cheap, and I would suggest if you have a slow one (black throttle tube), to get a fast one and see what you think.
Twin-shocker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2013, 06:02 AM   #20
laser17
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Location: Boston,Massachusetts
Oddometer: 665
I think the try and see part of that advice is the best part. Conversely, I have put on several slow throttles for novice riders to see them ride in a more controllable manner vs the everything is happening too fast syndrome they were in prior to its' install. IMO: Trials at the novice level is about learning to keep up with the bike reactions. The day your waiting for the bike to keep up with you - then go ahead and put the fast one back on. (Virtually all modern bikes come with a fast tube (white) as OEM)

Never-the-less, try it and see is always good advice.
laser17 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2013, 08:22 AM   #21
lineaway
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Oct 2011
Location: nm
Oddometer: 2,192
Trials is all about traction and body position. Until you have mastered clutch control for grip I would keep using the slow throttle.
lineaway is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2013, 10:00 AM   #22
Gordy
Team Listo
 
Gordy's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2001
Location: NM
Oddometer: 21,703
Quote:
Originally Posted by lineaway View Post
Trials is all about traction and body position. Until you have mastered clutch control for grip I would keep using the slow throttle.


IMO I hae never seen anyone even needing to get on the main jet until they have moved past intermediate.

Probabaly more new riders have been turned off to trials by whiskey throttling a bike and then trying to sit down, which causes even more throttle--with the ensuing
Gordy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2013, 12:36 PM   #23
Boom Boom
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Oct 2006
Location: Central PA
Oddometer: 223
For all the crap you stirred up over a little video clip be sure and let that camera in your truck when you come ride at my place. I sure don't want to give up all my crashing secrets
__________________
2014 Sherco ST 300 2011 Gas Gas 300ec
Boom Boom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2013, 09:42 PM   #24
lineaway
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Oct 2011
Location: nm
Oddometer: 2,192
Just for grins, check my son`s gasser for which throttle he runs. Black. He`s learning fast, but you first must learn.
lineaway is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2013, 09:01 AM   #25
thegraydog
2 wheels X 6 ways
 
thegraydog's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2004
Location: the Coconino
Oddometer: 589
I watched a few times to see what was bothering you about your form. I suppose a wheel touch, a little lift, no skid plate is nice, but hey -- you were practicing what a skidplate recovery feels like!

I can now assert that anyone who misinterprets Sting32's, um, effusive commentary should make the effort to ride with the dude. He's great fun.
thegraydog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2013, 09:32 AM   #26
NMTrailboss
Team Dead End
 
NMTrailboss's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Location: Albuquerque, NM
Oddometer: 5,721
Quote:
Originally Posted by thegraydog View Post
I can now assert that anyone who misinterprets Sting32's, um, effusive commentary should make the effort to ride with the dude. He's great fun.


And a good rider!
__________________
NMTrailboss is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2013, 09:45 AM   #27
motojunky OP
Professional Idiot
 
motojunky's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Location: North East, MD
Oddometer: 1,068
Quote:
Originally Posted by thegraydog View Post
I watched a few times to see what was bothering you about your form. I suppose a wheel touch, a little lift, no skid plate is nice, but hey -- you were practicing what a skidplate recovery feels like!

I can now assert that anyone who misinterprets Sting32's, um, effusive commentary should make the effort to ride with the dude. He's great fun.
I'm sure Sting is good people. We've had some PM conversations and I get that he means well. He just delivers it in a way that I don't always get. I don't think either of us are taking it that seriously and I think we'd get along great in person.

I wasn't complaining about my form or looking for advice. I was simply pointing out that even when you don't get it right, you can still get away with it. I sometimes dab too quickly, before giving myself a chance to get lucky. I've been getting better about patience and wanted to pass that on.

As far as advice on my form - there is so much good advice out there already that I can't seem to apply correctly on a regular basis...
motojunky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2013, 11:48 AM   #28
Twin-shocker
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jan 2012
Oddometer: 1,673
Have careful read of your Schrieber book, and pay particular attention to the double blip technique used on logs and other similar obstacles.

If you dont have one already fit a fast action throttle, and give riding that log another go. You will find it an awful lot easier, and will soon gain the confidence to ride much bigger obstacles.

The most important thing of all is to get your basic techniques right, and the Shrieber book will help a great deal with getting those right.
Twin-shocker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2013, 12:43 PM   #29
Choicecut
Lean, Tender and Juicy.
 
Choicecut's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2007
Location: Zanesville, Ohio
Oddometer: 289
Would this be the book you are referring to?

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B0007388JU
__________________
2000 Montesa Cota 315R;
1999 Buell X1 Lightning;
1995 BMWR1100GS;
1979 Suzuki DS 100;
2002 Honda XR50 (Pinky Pie);
Choicecut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2013, 12:53 PM   #30
lineaway
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Oct 2011
Location: nm
Oddometer: 2,192
That is the book. You should be able to buy it for 20-30 bucks. There was a large amount of them `found` last year and were being sold to fund the TDN team.
lineaway is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 04:59 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014