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Old 06-18-2013, 06:15 PM   #16
LittleRedToyota
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Truckin_Thumper View Post
ya'll are new at this, aincha?

That foot is an outrigger......flat trackers.....hot shoe.
+1.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=A13hMU23Res
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Old 06-18-2013, 07:17 PM   #17
erkmania
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bassplayinroach View Post
So I've been brave, or stupid depending how you look at it, and have been taking corners (gravel only) rather aggressively.
Balancing 'aggressive' with 'just right' is really the best part of riding for me - whether riding balls-to-the-wall, getting through traffic peacefully or just meandering. Getting "aggressive" WAY wrong WILL increase the pain factor from time to time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bassplayinroach View Post
I'll adjust my speed properly before entry, but as I come out, I'll feather the clutch and with lots of gas try to slide my rear tire to one side exiting.
Define "properly" since properly for you is not likely the same for a very skill-enhanced rider. I'm thinking that your "properly" might be timid to me and therefore you need a lot of extra throttle to bring the rear around.

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Originally Posted by bassplayinroach View Post
I've only been riding three years, but this move has gotten a hold of me by the britches. I've been practicing the for about a week now and finally had my first lay down.
Yeah. I think, for now, that using the clutch and revs to bring the rear around is beyond what you've learned so far. You are asking the rear tire to handle a dramatic change in force when you do this. This technique is probably best reserved for when the front end is plowing (sliding/digging into soft terrain) and there's no other way to catch the bike from falling than without a huge weight shift to the rear.

An old adage comes to mind, "smooth is slow and slow is fast." Misquoted for sure, but it means that you should be very smooth on the controls and activate them deliberately/slowly and not jerkily. The second part means to look far ahead and not just in front of your front tire. That allows you to take in a good amount of road data and act before you get to any particular part of the road. In other words, keep your eyes well ahead of the bike.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bassplayinroach View Post
Is this a bad idea to keep trying this maneuver? Do you execute it on corners? How often?
Sliding the rear tire? Most certainly, "NO." Doing it the way you are? Most certainly...well...maybe not. I can't predict how fast you will learn the technique, but if you master it before major calamity then you will likely learn about rear tire traction fairly fast.

After rereading what I wrote, I also want to include that you can cause a rear slide with a lot of throttle (or your way) and catch the slide if you quickly return the throttle to a less open position (NOT SHUT) and immediately begin to reopen the throttle gently one the tire hooks back up. The worst thing is to shut the throttle completely when the rear breaks free. Just return the throttle to a position slightly less than when the rear tire broke free and begin advancing it again when the rear tire regains traction.

Better riders than me may say differently, but the techniques I recommend are the same that have kept me safe for a lot of dirt, street and off-road miles.

Now, if I had some nads I might have just been faster...

PS - I love it when a genuinely interested noob rider goes at it with an open eye and willingness to learn. That just peps me up.
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Old 06-18-2013, 08:44 PM   #18
Fajita Dave
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Truckin_Thumper View Post
ya'll are new at this, aincha?

That foot is an outrigger......flat trackers.....hot shoe.
Eh, on a blue grooved flat track with your boot sliding would be fine. The OP is probably on a less then smooth surface and dabbing his foot to stop from dropping the bike. Rough terrain + foot stuck in the ground = knee injury if your leg is sticking out sideways. I learned that pretty quick on motocross tracks with left / right turns, ruts, bumps, and jumps.
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Old 06-18-2013, 09:04 PM   #19
BanjoBoy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fajita Dave View Post
Eh, on a blue grooved flat track with your boot sliding would be fine. The OP is probably on a less then smooth surface and dabbing his foot to stop from dropping the bike. Rough terrain + foot stuck in the ground = knee injury if your leg is sticking out sideways. I learned that pretty quick on motocross tracks with left / right turns, ruts, bumps, and jumps.
So I recon this here feller's do'in it wrong too?

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Old 06-18-2013, 09:17 PM   #20
svs
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I tell you what, a feller could get use to railing corners like that right there.

Yes sir, that's how ya do it...
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Old 06-19-2013, 06:02 PM   #21
viverrid
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BanjoBoy View Post
So I recon this here feller's do'in it wrong too?

You don't understand what he's doing. In Moto-X you put your leg & foot FORWARD for weight transfer, not "out" to prop up the bike and prevent a lowside. In the picture, the rider's heel might have BARELY touched some of the loose material rutted up in the corner. It's just random chance, he is NOT using his heel to put downward force onto the track.
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