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Old 07-03-2013, 09:28 AM   #1
chris3155 OP
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target archery

Hi , I am new to archery so please excuse my lack of knowledge . I like the more traditional look of a bow . The ragim matrix is a beautiful bow with a one piece dark wood riser and black limbs (red tips ,nice ). Why are the metal and carbon risers so much better , or the matrix might be seen by those of experience to be not as good . I would imagine that the matrix is manufactured to high tolerance , rigid , strong and would shoot consistent . Could you tell me how would the matrix compare to something like a samick polaris .Thank you in advance for your time ,Chris

P.S. for target only
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Old 07-03-2013, 09:37 PM   #2
shrineclown
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I use a Hoyt takedown that I have had for almost 30 years. I have purchased compounds: to name a few...PSE had the first super fast eliptical carbon fiber, did not like it..too noisy. Was fast. Then I got an Oneida....good target bow, very consistent..very noisy. not so much for hunting IMO. offed that too. Then an AR which was a higher end PSE product they discontinued I believe; friend of mine shot for them. got rid of it. Matthews is the hot bow these days among many shooters. They look good, folks love them. Noise is not a problem with targets, they don't squat. I like my old fashioned takedown Hoyt...even though everyone laughs at me. Wood is good. Properly cared for it goes on and on and on. I like Hoyt products, so do Olympians. Hoyt has gone to an aluminum riser and high tech materials on limbs. I have considered getting one, but the wood is nice on a cold day. I have to believe that it is colder in hand than wood; these new bows. They know what they are doing though, so I am sure it is a vast improvement over my bow in performance. I will break down and get one eventually; just to stop the jokes.

I have some longbows, as well, that are really fun to shoot at targets...but not practical hanging in a tree unless you can get just the right situation or a very large stand. I would wait until you find your happy equilibrium before investing in one of these as they are very user specific for you to be satisfied. IMHO

If you have a good bow shop in your area, that has demo's, go try them first. In my area that is tough since all the good bow shops are all compound centric shops. Hard to find a recurve on a shelf. If you know it is something you already want to do, it is worth the extra money to get a higher end bow. You will outgrow or maybe I should say outlove a novice bow quickly. The learning curve is quick for most people. If it is something you just want to try, anything will do.

The one I have now I got in Canada on a trip where my older bow got trashed by the airline...it was all they had and I have loved since the very first day. Good thing since it was the only choice at the time for the letoff I was looking for. I will tell you it is definitely a personal thing...something I like you may hate and vice versa. So, if you can try them first...it is a good idea and you will be much happier with your decision long term. The nice thing about takedowns is you can ramp up the limbs when you are ready. Same as a compound, only more expensive to do it; it is not just an adjustment it is a purchase.

My kids I am teaching on a compound, it is just easier to use and get proficient with. It is a Matthews...and when they get a bit bigger I will get them Hoyt's. There is no need to go out and spend $1,400 for a compound if you think that is how you want to go at first, you can find a really nice one on craigslist or such for much less and probably pretty well set up. (that someone is selling to get the latest and greatest) Get fitted first so you know that you are getting a suitable compound bow for you. It does matter, I like being in the middle of the bows range rather than at either end. Most folks take very good care of their bows, unless they fall out of tree. And you can usually see the stresses caused by that unless they have painted it over...you might want to be wary and have it checked out at a shop if that is the case before buying. Some folks do like to camo their own patterns, so that is not always a bad thing it has been painted. But with all the new patterns, I think most folks are happy with the newer bows as is.

Hope that helps point you in a direction. It is a lot of fun and good therapy.
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Old 07-06-2013, 06:43 PM   #3
dtirell
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I have to admit I have not shot the Matrix, but have played around with the samick polaris and it is a nice basic bow that will not break the bank.

Since you are just getting into archery and want to do target archery, there are some limitations to these types of entry bows. First is while you can swap out limbs you are limited to the ones made for these bows which will limit the options you have in terms of performance outside of draw weight.

The popularity of the metal and carbon risers is they all tend to use the ILF limb system which means a wide selection of limb manufacturers and limb materials - this offers the greatest flexibility as your experience level goes up.

Be aware, hoyt has two systems, one is proprietary system and the other is ILF.

The other advantage to the metal/carbon risers is they will almost always have all of the tap points for add on equipment in the event you want to move from more traditional (no sights, stabilizers, clickers, etc) into more of the Olympic/fita style shooting.

I primarily shoot compound but have a recurve for form practice and a loaner bow. My recurve is a Sebastian Flute Axiom 23" riser with Axiom long limbs. This is a 68" bow with a very smooth draw and a lot of fun to shoot. This is a low cost rig that shoots really well.

The other riser that I liked (at the low end cost wise) is the Cartel Fantom - it is a 25" riser but is nice and inexpensive.

One thing to note on these less expensive metal risers is the paint is not the best. If you take good care of them it will be fine but plan on the possibility of chipping when you choose a color. The more expensive risers will have better paint or be anodized.

Ideally, if you can, find a bow shop with a range so you can try some different bows out (risers and limbs etc) to see what feels best for you. Finding a bow that feels good and one that you can get tuned into will do more for your scores than anything else.

Hope this helps, if you have other questions, just ask.
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Old 07-07-2013, 05:14 AM   #4
chris3155 OP
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Thank for taking the time to reply , I really do appreciate it . Shrineclown I think I may end up falling in love with a bow and I hope I have 30 years left in me to use it . I like the wood , more traditional .I just wouldn't feel right holding a piece of metal . Starting with a local club today so I will be getting coaching from a nice bunch of people who know their stuff . For me a takedown is the way to go as it will be easy to carry on the bike. I want to try first without a sight then take it from there .The members of the club have recommended a shop where they get their stuff from . they say don't buy yet , no point in buying too soon .
Dtirell the matrix has the places for a sight button and stabiliser bar if I was to buy it . I just think it looks nicer dark with the black limbs . Thanks for the info
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Old 07-07-2013, 08:21 AM   #5
dtirell
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Chris, sounds like your club has some good members and some good advice. My main suggestion is try every and any bow you can get your hands on before you buy (even ones you do not think you will like) as it will make that first purchase last longer.

If you are looking to carry on your bike, definitely go with a takedown.

My recurve is a takedown (even though it is not always listed as such) and I bought a large arrow case (an MTM arrow plus case). I did a little surgery to remove a set of dividers on the bottom to fit the bow. I also added foam to the bottom with cut outs for the limbs and riser.

This gave me a nice compact hard case for the bow that also holds some accessories and a full set of arrows (9 at the moment as I am still playing with what I want to use full time). The hard case is easy to strap to the bike and I am less worried about damage now - I did start with a soft sided case.

Just a thought for you when you do find a bow to buy.
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Old 07-08-2013, 05:57 AM   #6
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That sounds like a good setup for carrying the lot . I would like to keep it all safe for transport . I will spend the next 6 weeks seeing what I am comfortable with and I'll try not to rush into any speedy decisions
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