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Old 02-13-2013, 04:08 AM   #916
nimrod
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Originally Posted by Lost Rider View Post
I thought this thread was about what we cook/eat while camping?
Not the vehicles BeemerChef has traveled in while living his life how he sees fit over many years while sharing it so elegantly with the ADV community, Tex.

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Being without refrigeration however for over 6 years now there really is not much clean up needed and I generally cook something that will remain for a couple of days. Again, with the simplicity of no refrigeration all is so much more easier with specially no spoilage. [hey, I am still alive...]

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Where did this motor home come from? There is a small camper here at The Oasis, a shipping container, fire pits, solar Oven, sorry, but no refrigeration for the few weeks a year we are here to regroup. Consider it a storage. I call it a "Base Camp".

The discussion is about refrigeration.
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Old 02-13-2013, 06:29 AM   #917
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Thank "Lost Rider" and "Nimrod"...
I love those Photos and the way you cook.
I think about fishing a lot but the Licenses for out of State are expensive and getting caught without one is not an option.
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Old 02-13-2013, 04:00 PM   #918
TebKLR
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Originally Posted by tafflink View Post
I'm looking for guidance.
Thanks.
I like couscous.....easier and more fuel-efficient than rice. Add some canned/cooked mini shrimp, and you have a meal fit for a king!
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Old 02-14-2013, 08:25 AM   #919
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Originally Posted by meatwitheyes View Post
More compact folding or collapsible cookware that takes up less space when packed, I think, is always a good idea. I did a quick search and also came up with a collapsible silicone pot that is available in the UK.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006BA7MM2/
Nice, I've seen the cups and bowls for a while now, but hadn't seen actual cooking utensils utilising this technology. I might look into getting some for my Kifaru stove (where heat is a flat metal surface, not a flame, so the risk of melting is far lower). It'd be interesting to see if you could get a saucepan in this style that nested perfectly inside a frying pan. I'd only really want to change my current (Titanium - MyTi) cookware if I could get a whole cookset of kettle, frying pan, saucepan and cup in less total space than all that stuff nested.
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Old 08-29-2013, 07:04 PM   #920
JR Greenhorn
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Originally Posted by BeemerChef View Post
Trying to devise so clamps to mount those Gear-Pods directly on the bike. Like those generic tool tubes. The Gear-Pods are waterproof and great for dry ingredients.
If you didn't mind mounting them exposed, something like this might work?:



http://www.endroad.com/index.php/qui...ist-clamp.html

I've never tried them myself, but these Quick Fist Clamps get pretty good reviews around the interwebs.
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Old 08-29-2013, 07:33 PM   #921
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Admittedly, I typically do the base camp thing with dirt bikes, but some of what's worked for us might work for those of you who enjoy a good meal in camp.




For the last couple of years, I've always had a bag of this packed with my camp cooking gear:





It has a great hearty, nutty flavour. Very filling. It tastes even better when made with chicken broth, so I usually carry some chicken bouillon cubes with my camp cook gear. Instead of the broth, the old packaging suggested adding a bit of olive oil to the water, which is also good. Of course you can make it with just water too.

It does take 45 minutes to cook, and it should sit in the pot a little while before eating (preparation instructions are on their website), so you likely know already if this is fits your style or not.

For me, I usually start the rice, start working on the rest of the meal, and have enough time to enjoy sipping down my first cup of this for the evening:






Before making my first trip to the Bounday Waters Canoe Area this spring, I had done some reseach on historical methods of packing food. I came across this reenactor's online store, and decided to try their Beef Barley Soup mix:




We added some of their shredded dried beef:



...to the soup and simmered it while boiling the rice (2 burners needed, or could simmer soup over a fire depending on your setup). As suggested on their online store, the soup makes an excellent sauce over rice, especially the Wild Blend rice! The meal sure was a hit in camp. One 1/2lb package of their soup mix with one 2oz package of their beef made just enough to cover the entire 4lb bag of rice, which didn't quite feed 9 guys. Obviously the portions could be cut down.

This is probably the best non-perishable, easy-packable meal I've yet tried.

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Old 08-29-2013, 09:00 PM   #922
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Another meal that's become one of my camp favourites in recent years is Hurst's HamBeens 15 Bean Soup:





Here's a batch I made in a dirt bike base camp, prepared basically per package instructions:



It looks like vomit, but it tastes so good!


For meat we picked up a 2lb package of ham shanks at a small-town grocery store on the way to camp. In addition to some sort of meat (ham bone or shanks, Andouille or Kielbasa sausage, etc.), the package directions also call for a can of tomatoes (I like crushed), chopped onion and garlic. There are some ingredient variations depending on which kind you get (Original vs. Cajun, etc.), but with this kind of thing you just make it like the package says the first couple of times, then start improvising.

The soup's directions also call for "the juice of one lemon" (I typically pack a lemon along when camping so I can throw a few slices in my hydration bladder when I fill it up). I like the soup with the lemon juice, but the consensus in camp was that it should have been skipped.

We also cut up and threw in a little package of celery and baby carrots, the kind marketed toward kid's lunches. I love these little packages, because they're usually sized just-right to add to soups, or potatoes grilled in foil pouches, etc.



Here's another batch of 15 Bean Soup I made in the Boundary Waters:




For this batch, we only used the beans. For meat, I had a 2lb slab of "genuine country cured bacon" from Turkey Foot Trading Company. I wish I'd have taken a picture of that bacon. It was 1/2" thick, salt-cured, smoked, and peppered. Very old-fashioned but very packable, and of couse non-perishable. It made a great broth (it needed nothing added), but it sure was a PITA to cut up. I'm not sure yet if I'd get it again.



The nine of us cound't finish all of the soup, but we had also made garlic bread fom a bâtard loaf, butter, and Tastefully Simple Italian Garlic Bread Seasoning, another standy-by in my camp cook gear:



The bâtard loaf was one of six we had packed along. I had a local bakery bake them a little longer than normal to make them more packable and longer-lasting. This is something I will definately do again for another trip somewhere. You just have to find a good bakery willing to do it, and give them a couple days notice. Authentic French bread would be even more packable, but I haven't been able to find anything like that in my corner of the States yet. Regadless, what I did find and bring with was enough to prove to the experienced backpacker/canoeist in our group that bread could indeed be packable.


This was our camp kitchen on night 3 in the BWCA, but this could have just as easily been packed along on a bike instead of a canoe:








A whole package of the 15 Bean Soup feeds a lot, but like anything, it could be separated into portions appropriate for smaller groups. I usually find myself cooking for 3-9 people when I camp.

The beans are an all-day project, but very low effort. They need to soak for 8 hours, and then simmer for about 3 hours more. We start soaking the beans while cooking breakfast the morning of. In a base camp, they can just soak in the pot all day. We've also soaked them in the pot on the floor of the car while traveling that way. In the Boundary Waters, we soaked them in a lage Zip-Lock bag somebody had, and I just carried the bag on the portages. For soaking smaller quantities of beans while traveling all day, I've just put them in an empty Gatorade bottle with water.

The 3 hour simmer time is a lot, but it gives plenty of time to get a campfie going, sit back and relax with a cup of:

...and swap stories with my camp mates while we savor the aroma of the soup cooking and anxiously await the meal.

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Old 08-29-2013, 09:29 PM   #923
Don Coyote
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Originally Posted by JR Greenhorn View Post
Before making my first trip to the Bounday Waters Canoe Area this spring, I had done some reseach on historical methods of packing food. I came across this reenactor's online store,
I like the cut of your jib...
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Old 08-29-2013, 09:55 PM   #924
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One more...


Tortellini with pesto sauce has recently become another meal "foundation" for us. We've had some really poor stuff (both the tortellini and the pesto) from a grocery store deli, and we've had some really excellent non-perishable stuff fom a little Italian grocer in the City Market in Kansas City. Lately we've settled on these brands that we've been able to reliably find locally to us:



Both of those packages are smaller than you might think. The little jar of pesto is less than 3" tall and 1.75" in diameter. The box of tortellini is just over 4"x6"x1". This tortellini is parmesan cheese-filled, but it comes in spinach-filled too (just not where we shop). These packages are nice and packable, so now I keep one of each in my camp cooking gear as a meal option (along with my Wild Blend rice, a pouch of Shore Lunch for fish, and a few other things).


To make this, you just boil the tortellini, drain the water off, spoon the pesto in and mix. It's good just like that, but even better when you add other things.




This was a two-pot meal I made while camping with my family at McLain State Park in Michigan's UP:



I had packed along the tortellini and pesto, and we stopped at a grocery store in Houghton to pick up some chicken breasts and fresh broccoli. While the tortellini boiled in the big pot, we cut up and fried the chicken breasts in a pan. The tortellini was about done when the chicken was so we drained off the water and added the chicken and pesto to the tortellini.

Meanwhile we had poured off some of the water into the pan from the chicken, cut up the broccoli, and boiled/steamed it. As soon as the broccoli was soft we added it to the other pot, mixed it up and served. The whole family loved it, even my son who thinks he doesn't like broccoli. My wife is anxious to have this again at home.

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Old 08-29-2013, 10:33 PM   #925
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cooking

I started traveling with day old bread and peanut butter I've evolved to carrying my espresso pot some spices .I like coos-coos for speed and taste my cook set is enough for three people one eating out of the cook pot. I like to have dried stuff , Cabbage cooks back to new taste potatoes cut into cubes shrink very small when dried they are great in soups not so good soaked and fried. I stop at the last town for meat and veggies. I can carry enough food for two or three days of good meals .I dont spend weeks out so I dont need super compact food .I carry a solar shower and a book.I deserve to eat well !
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Old 08-30-2013, 06:45 AM   #926
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I really struggle on the road with most canned pre packaged food like the tortellini ramen noodles beans soup ect. It's the sodium count.

My BF is a type 1 diabetic with borderline high blood pressure so he must be very careful with sodium intake. It seems EVeRYTHING is very high in sodium

Bouillon cubes hotdogs ,I mean, so much is laced with salt. We just got back from the gap and I made steamed veggies with crabmeat, hambuergers( I was able to keep beef patties frozen) and I can't even remember if I made anything else,but we didn't eat out once.

I carry a cooler and refresh ice twice a day during fill ups.when the ice melts I pour the ice water into my water bottle. We end up buying fresh fruit hard boiled eggs, thin sliced bagels. We bring cereal with us and peanut butter.

So that's my beef on so much of these recipes,( without reading all 50 pages) salt salt salt.......
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Old 08-30-2013, 08:26 AM   #927
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Originally Posted by theshnizzle View Post
So that's my beef on so much of these recipes,( without reading all 50 pages) salt salt salt.......
I often carry whole-wheat spaghetti and a salt-free soup base. I always hope to find fresh food to round out the meal, but if I don't I can assemble something with just what I carry.

Whole-wheat spag, broken, packs smaller for the amount of food than hollow pastas. It won't spike blood sugar, and I am often surprised at the small groceries that have WW spag. I've used lots of Cous-cous on trips but it gets old pretty fast (for me).

I can't think of the brand of soup base I used but I restocked at a "natural food" store in BC. If a major food manufacturer reduces sodium they'll lose market share unless they can add sugar or fat. You probably know to watch for sugar in several forms in any product labeled as "low sodium".

I always want to add fresh food purchased late in the day. Some days that doesn't work out so well.

For breakfast I have walnuts in my oatmeal. I'm not particularly a fan of oatmeal, but adding walnuts makes it more filling and longer lasting but keeps it simple, fast, and non-perishable. The star of my morning is coffee. Strong black coffee.

I'm happy to stop at small stores for fresh food daily, but I'm not going into a big supermarket every day even in places where one can FIND a big supermarket every day.
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Old 08-30-2013, 12:39 PM   #928
WeeBee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theshnizzle View Post
I really struggle on the road with most canned pre packaged food like the tortellini ramen noodles beans soup ect. It's the sodium count.

My BF is a type 1 diabetic with borderline high blood pressure so he must be very careful with sodium intake. It seems EVeRYTHING is very high in sodium

Bouillon cubes hotdogs ,I mean, so much is laced with salt. We just got back from the gap and I made steamed veggies with crabmeat, hambuergers( I was able to keep beef patties frozen) and I can't even remember if I made anything else,but we didn't eat out once.

I carry a cooler and refresh ice twice a day during fill ups.when the ice melts I pour the ice water into my water bottle. We end up buying fresh fruit hard boiled eggs, thin sliced bagels. We bring cereal with us and peanut butter.

So that's my beef on so much of these recipes,( without reading all 50 pages) salt salt salt.......
I hear ya on the Sodium. I've never been a big salt fiend but have had to cut way back on my intake and start reading the labels on everything as I lost one of my Kidneys to Cancer last year and must do all I can to avoid developing High Blood Pressure.

Hope you carry some Imodium with you on your rides as drinking meltwater from a cooler might eventually find you running faster than your bike
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Old 09-08-2013, 11:55 PM   #929
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Some really good ideas in here. I've only been on 3-5 day trips so far and normally eat out, but have a cross country trip for next month and wanna save some $.
For the nights I don't eat out, this is something I've found to help a lot
http://www.zorotools.com/g/00054733/...FeqDQgod3V0AAA

Just a small storage container that I put different baggies of spices in the compartments. I think mine is all of 6"x4"x1" and has 9 compartments. Use 3 for salt/ pepper, 2 for crushed garlic, 1 for crushed onion, "Chinese five spice (ground star anise, Sichuan peppercorns, fennel seed, ground cloves and Korintje cinnamon)," 1 for cayenne pepper and the last normally for a premixed Cajun blend. One time I substituted the Chinese five spice for one of those food service small dipping sauce containers with olive oil... Didn't work so hot.
I normally carry some noodles for "emergency" and just put spices on it. Not the best, but have had worse (go through the Air Force SERE school and you're not so picky anymore after, haha).
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