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Old 09-02-2013, 07:02 PM   #16
Blakebird
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I'd like to have seen pics of someone pinstriping tanks and fenders - those were great.



Quote:
Originally Posted by nachtflug View Post


did he really??


http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...&postcount=214
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Old 09-02-2013, 09:28 PM   #17
ThumperStorm
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Originally Posted by JerryH View Post
VERY interesting. I especially like this line. These were taken when men were men and safety was for sissies.
Seems like on every forum here safety is everything, and everybody believes that ABS and airbags, etc. will give them that. They are willing to give up control of their bikes for the sake of safety. What's even worse is that none of these safety gadgets have actually been proven to increase safety. Rider skill, experience, and the right attitude is what will keep you alive.

I am not a ATGATT rider, but do wear a full face helmet. I have no desire to get hurt, and have never crashed on the street in over 40 years and half a million miles of riding. I'm not bragging, I just think it is something to be proud of.


But back to Harleys. I know it is not yet old enough to be considered vintage, clones of it are still being built by the boatload. But I recently had the opportunity to watch someone rebuild an EVO motor, and absolutely fell in love with it. Despite the fact that it was made into the late '90s, this engine is about as close to a Model T as you can get. Harley (and the aftermarket) made almost every part in different sizes, so it could all be "fitted" together. Unlike Japanese bikes, every little part is replaceable, right down to the rollers in the bearing cages. It is obvious that a skilled and patient mechanic could build a much better engine than Harley did on their assembly line. The cases could be used almost forever, and the cylinders have several oversizes. Even the crank and con rods can be disassembled and rebuilt. And the aftermarket makes several upgraded parts.


Sadly when Harley went to the Twin Cam engine, they also went with the Japanese style manufacturing process in many areas, making them much harder to rebuild. To me, if an engine cannot be rebuilt a few times, it isn't worth very much. Just another disposable hunk of metal that costs more to rebuild than to replace. And since Harley has patented most of the parts on the new motor, the aftermarket will probably not be able to supply parts, at least parts that don't cost a fortune after they give Harley their share.
I find it interesting that you don't seem to believe in most safety gear but admit you wear a helmet, a full face helmet at that, because you don't want to get hurt.

To me, if an engine has to be rebuilt several times, it is not worth much to me.
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Old 09-10-2013, 09:54 AM   #18
jcf
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Originally Posted by JerryH View Post
What I love about old bikes (besides the way they look) is the total lack of any kind of electronic technology. I even love points ignition. I want a bike that I can ride, not one that rides itself. I once owned a '66 Triumph Bonneville (for about 3 years) and loved it. I would still have it, if it hadn't broken down and left me stranded one to many times. Yes, I learned to carry spares for the stuff that broke most often, but that was not always enough. I had no problem with any other part of it, it was a joy to ride, is why I put up with it's constant problems for so long. I had no issue whatsoever with the brakes, I learned the proper technique for using them. Unfortunately the front brake cable broke constantly.

I want an old bike because I hate modern crap. And I will find one. It is not as easy as it would seem. I found 2 old cars real easy, one is 50 years old with 4 wheel non power assisted drum brakes. I have never crashed it. You have to learn to ride and drive the way people did back in the days before "modern" vehicles. Both my old cars are American. They would be impossible to keep going if they were Japanese, due to a lack of parts. Same issue with Japanese bikes. And 99% of most of the old bikes you find out there for a decent price are Japanese. After getting a really good look in that Harley engine, and finding out how cheap the parts are, I am now pretty sure that's what I want. A carbed non ABS EVO Harley with an actual throttle cable. I'll just have to save up a little more money.
Big plus 1 on all that !
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Old 09-11-2013, 03:14 PM   #19
groop
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10th photo up....what model is that? Doesn't look like any Harley I've ever seen that was made in Milwaukee. Even the plant windows look different from the other shots. That guy...that guy looks eye-talian too.

Maybe an Aermacchi 250 Ala d'Oro?
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Old 09-11-2013, 07:25 PM   #20
Blakebird
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Originally Posted by groop View Post
10th photo up....what model is that? Doesn't look like any Harley I've ever seen that was made in Milwaukee. Even the plant windows look different from the other shots. That guy...that guy looks eye-talian too.

Maybe an Aermacchi 250 Ala d'Oro?
definitely Aermacchi, maybe an early 60's Ala Verde?
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Old 09-13-2013, 05:43 AM   #21
gunsports
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Originally Posted by JerryH View Post
Building an older Harley engine is a lot like gunsmithing. No two are exactly the same.
Try restoring/rebuilding 1800's flint and cap lock rifles! Not only are ALL parts hand made and fitted; replacement parts just don't exist. You need a part, you make it!

Admittedly, most modern gunsmiths are fitters, not 'smiths.
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