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Old 10-14-2013, 11:27 AM   #15676
SScratch
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I had a chat with a rep from Bike Bandit. He said that even though their site lists parts compatible with the bike you enter into the search, the parts listed for your bike may have to be "retrofitted" to actually fit.

They are taking the Goodridge line and fittings back and will issue a credit. I'll give Spiegler a call.
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Old 10-14-2013, 11:54 AM   #15677
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I just got off the phone with Spiegler. A very professional and efficient person verified all the dimensions and specs of their Transalp kit, will make one fresh today and ship tomorrow for $71 including line, fittings and shipping. Awesome service is alive and well in Ohio.

Thanks for the lead, TransAfrika.
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Old 10-14-2013, 08:06 PM   #15678
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jwb View Post
Is there any reason you're replacing the brake line at all? It hardly seems like the weak link in the brakes of an '89 TA (I have one).
Guess you've never experienced the difference when a stock rubber brake line has been replaced by a quality SS line.
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Old 10-15-2013, 01:10 AM   #15679
jamie92j
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thunder Dan View Post
G'day Jamie,

Welcome on board, you do realize there is no turning back now .
These machines (particularly the sweet little v-twin) are addictive. Nice work with the front end. Are they 48mm units? Did you modify the existing stem or fit one of the Rugged Roads stems?
What did the forks come off, and is that the KTM wheel as well? Have you altered the spring rate yet?

Nice work, keep it up!


Cheers,

Dan.
Hi Dan

This is my forth transalp, iv had two 600s and two 650s!

The front end is a exc250 48mm, I used the rugged roads stem to keep it simple

I'm still unsure of what spring rate to get, my mate has .56nm on his rd03 but think I might go slightly softer, this bike is mainly for off road so I want it quite stiff, any suggestions on spring rate are welcome!

Next thing I will need is a rear shock to keep up with the front end! Any suggestions are also welcome for this!

The front wheel is still the ktm skinny one, but I have a matching black excel rim which is proper transalp width so I will get that on at some point!

I want to keep as much weight off the bike as possible, I think I should save at least 20kg off the original weight!
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Old 10-15-2013, 04:43 AM   #15680
ravelv
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Also wondering about this... on my TA stock lines looks like new, no cracks or whatever other visible defects. Can these one day just split without any other signs appearing prior?

Quote:
Originally Posted by SScratch View Post
Brake lines are a wear item and should be replaced before they fail. Most manufacturers recommend replacing the oem lines every 4-5 years to cover their butts. Not that they won't last longer, but no one knows how much longer. My oem BMW lines lasted 10 & 11 years, but they are not good for the life of the motorcycle. SS lines are guaranteed for the life of the motorcycle. They also don't flex as much as old rubber lines so they do work better.

If you feel safe using oem lines for 20 to 30 years, feel free to do so. It is not a good idea to recommend them, in writing on the internet, to the world at large though. You leave yourself open to a very lawsuit-happy populace.
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Old 10-15-2013, 04:51 AM   #15681
ravelv
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Honestly, I like more rubber ones. Why? Because rubber ones somewhat softens sharp and quick lever pressing and thus wheel locking is less likely possible in extreme situation.
Stock single rotor brakes on TA are somewhat weak and SS lines allows press to them harder and thus getting feeling of improvement, but I think, this is not right way- proper brakes should work perfect with any type of lines. So, that's why I din't upgrade brake lines, but I upgraded to 296mm rotor and SLR650 Brembo caliper. Now even with stock rubber brake line brakes are perfectly adequate.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NorCalTA View Post
Guess you've never experienced the difference when a stock rubber brake line has been replaced by a quality SS line.
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Old 10-15-2013, 07:49 AM   #15682
TransAfrika
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SScratch View Post
Brake lines are a wear item and should be replaced before they fail. Most manufacturers recommend replacing the oem lines every 4-5 years to cover their butts. Not that they won't last longer, but no one knows how much longer. My oem BMW lines lasted 10 & 11 years, but they are not good for the life of the motorcycle. SS lines are guaranteed for the life of the motorcycle. They also don't flex as much as old rubber lines so they do work better.

If you feel safe using oem lines for 20 to 30 years, feel free to do so. It is not a good idea to recommend them, in writing on the internet, to the world at large though. You leave yourself open to a very lawsuit-happy populace.

Hi i looked here :

http://www.trwmoto.com/modelle/mrid/...ccm/600/typ/XL
this is a manufactur with good quality and ABE .
And to everybody with rubber lines, change them and then you will feel the progress. Every racing bike have them and they know why. KTM and Husaberg and many more use them as stock for there bikes.

I changed them at a NX 650 from my wife, and now the brake performance is much better, it is not nice when you could pull the lever to the handelbar, after a long downhill part with full load on your bike.
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Old 10-15-2013, 02:15 PM   #15683
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Obviously the SS lines do give a firmer braking sensation but I'm going to agree with Ravelv, I to prefer the rubber brake lines. The one TA that I had with stainless lines just felt like overkill with little sense of braking modulation. I'm not racing and almost never need more than two fingers on the front level to handling most all braking. The larger 316mm rotor and steel lines felt more like a "on off" brake switch, just didn't like it.

The 91 TA that I owned did come with a one piece oem front brake hose, no cross over pipe or line connetions. This brake hose was a big improvement over the 89-90 brake lines and I thought it was the best with a much more solid feel.

Regarding rubber brake hoses "wearing", it might be more accurate to say they can deteriorate but I haven't seen that as a problem. I have serviced a couple of dozen Transalps and have never found a brake hose to look bad or questionable. The rubber lines are filiment braided under the rubber outer surface so the risk of one "blowing" or having a sudden major failure is highly doubtful. I would always be on the look out for any signs of a bulge in any rubber hose but that is just common sense. I doubt that the brake fluid pressure inside the hose is all that high and certainly well within the hose capability. I would be far more concerned about cooling lines needing replacing than the brake hose.

The quickest and cheapest way I have found to improve the front braking is by switching to EBC FA69HH pads. They are quiet and seem to set in quickly. I have seen rotors that were destroyed by using the wrong pad compound and these work fine for me. Not sure how they would work at race speeds but I don't ride that way.

Since you will have the brake system drained it would be a perfect time to overhaul the caliper as well to obtaining the most efficient braking system that you can have. Rusted and/or pitting caliper cups and dried out seals will hinder how well the caliper functions, something that a different brake fluid line won't cure.
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Old 10-15-2013, 02:27 PM   #15684
ravelv
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My present brake setup allows me to lock front wheel quite easy with two fingers on lever and full load if I want to. Alone I'm not using more than one finger usually. And that's with 296mm rotor (though, with much better Brembo caliper than TA's Nissin. Brembo also have one piston bigger)!
With SS line this setup would be difficult to use as mas335 wrote.
So, no point to change brake lines for me. As I said, SS line is a kind of remedy, but not completely solves problem in its root- weak front brake by design. It is recognised also by Honda as from 1997 TA's have dual rotor setup in front.



And NX650 stock brakes are not shinning as well like TA's stock ones...

Quote:
Originally Posted by TransAfrika View Post
...
And to everybody with rubber lines, change them and then you will feel the progress. Every racing bike have them and they know why. KTM and Husaberg and many more use them as stock for there bikes.

I changed them at a NX 650 from my wife, and now the brake performance is much better, it is not nice when you could pull the lever to the handelbar, after a long downhill part with full load on your bike.

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Old 10-15-2013, 02:51 PM   #15685
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fwiw, I have owned a few NX650's and am always impressed with those factory front brakes, wish the TA worked that well but the NX is a considerable lighter bike and easier to stop.
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Old 10-15-2013, 03:03 PM   #15686
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I just love the sweet rear drum brake.
Who needs hydraulic lines????










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Old 10-15-2013, 03:11 PM   #15687
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WP Forks on a TransAlp

jamie92j Nice Work!

..............Tachedoutoffroad.........HA!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!! Squeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeekkkkk!!!!!!


The RaceTech springs come in kg/mm and not nm, according to a conversion I found online .56nm = 57.1 kg/mm. But, RaceTech offers up to 52 kg/mm springs for the 48mm WP forks and I have not researched other manufacturers. I had a pair of 43mm WPs with 48kg/mm springs that were way too soft, I was going to put in the brand new 50s I bought (heaviest offered for the 43mms) but found that the shim plates in the bottom came unscrewed and came out in 50 pieces, so the forks were not worth fixing. But that just means I have a pair of twin cartridge 48mm WPs on their way....

Do you have a steering stop yet? I just welded one up like the KTMs.

I like my EBC 320mm rotor kit, braided steel line, and stock KTM Brembo caliper.

Klaus at HyperPro should be able to finally make me a rear shock for the full RD07 rear end (triangle too) I am running at the end of the month, it drops the swing arm by about 4 inches and balances the forks out nicely and should hopefully get me about a foot of travel, and its not all chopped out and squatty in the back like it was. Needed to add a chain roller though.

I went with a 1.65 front rim, if you like hitting rocks at full speed it might be better to stay narrow.


-Zach




Quote:
Originally Posted by jamie92j View Post
Hi Dan

This is my forth transalp, iv had two 600s and two 650s!

The front end is a exc250 48mm, I used the rugged roads stem to keep it simple

I'm still unsure of what spring rate to get, my mate has .56nm on his rd03 but think I might go slightly softer, this bike is mainly for off road so I want it quite stiff, any suggestions on spring rate are welcome!

Next thing I will need is a rear shock to keep up with the front end! Any suggestions are also welcome for this!

The front wheel is still the ktm skinny one, but I have a matching black excel rim which is proper transalp width so I will get that on at some point!

I want to keep as much weight off the bike as possible, I think I should save at least 20kg off the original weight!
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Old 10-15-2013, 03:17 PM   #15688
SScratch
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I am also implementing the poor man's abs system. You know, hosing down the rotor and drum with WD40. Gets rid of the squeaks too.
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Old 10-15-2013, 03:20 PM   #15689
mas335
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tachedoutoffroad View Post
I just love the sweet rear drum brake.
Who needs hydraulic lines????


Well since you brought that up........I didn't like the rear disc brake on that 91 bike, sure it looked cool but it took too much foot pressure to get the brake working. With that much pedal pressure I lost the "feel" for what the brake was actually doing. Maybe I just needed to get used to it, maybe try different pads, not sure.

For as poor as the TA drum brake is I can at least get within a fraction of locking it up and know where I am in the braking process.
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Old 10-15-2013, 04:57 PM   #15690
happyclam
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Z_HARSH View Post
jamie92j Nice Work!

..............Tachedoutoffroad.........HA!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!! Squeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeekkkkk!!!!!!


The RaceTech springs come in kg/mm and not nm, according to a conversion I found online .56nm = 57.1 kg/mm. But, RaceTech offers up to 52 kg/mm springs for the 48mm WP forks and I have not researched other manufacturers. I had a pair of 43mm WPs with 48kg/mm springs that were way too soft, I was going to put in the brand new 50s I bought (heaviest offered for the 43mms) but found that the shim plates in the bottom came unscrewed and came out in 50 pieces, so the forks were not worth fixing. But that just means I have a pair of twin cartridge 48mm WPs on their way....

Do you have a steering stop yet? I just welded one up like the KTMs.

I like my EBC 320mm rotor kit, braided steel line, and stock KTM Brembo caliper.

Klaus at HyperPro should be able to finally make me a rear shock for the full RD07 rear end (triangle too) I am running at the end of the month, it drops the swing arm by about 4 inches and balances the forks out nicely and should hopefully get me about a foot of travel, and its not all chopped out and squatty in the back like it was. Needed to add a chain roller though.

I went with a 1.65 front rim, if you like hitting rocks at full speed it might be better to stay narrow.


-Zach
Hey Zach, Can you post a pic of your chain roller. I just took off my slider and ground 3/16 out of it to alleviate some tension. It was the chain noise that inspired me.(new did) I had added the shock spacer to match xrl front forks, hence the increased angle. It's quieter, but still noisy. Hope it's not something else.The chain slack is not the problem.
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