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Old 10-27-2013, 03:12 PM   #31
jules083 OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bart View Post
In my experience, if you want to get rid of the dampness you need to eliminate the temperature differential between the block wall and the living space. That is what creates the condensation and hence the dampness. Frame insulate vapour barrier and finish with drywall or whatever you want. Provided you insulate the block from the inside temperature it won't condensate.
That's what I keep hearing.

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Originally Posted by squiffynimrod View Post
There's a Canadian home improvement guru called Shell Busey who's been around for ages. I followed his procedure when finishing a basement room and it worked out great. Here's a cut and paste from his site:
Too much work and fussing around.

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http://www.ceilinglink.com

Tile ceiling without the drop

I have zero interest in finishing the ceiling. All that would do is make me more work and money with zero benefit. Perhaps even a loss of benefit, unless I also re-do all of my ductwork beforehand


I'm just going to start gluing EXP sheets up. Stud wall screwed in the block behind that, drywall on the studs. Whatever doesn't get done this winter will get done the next, it's not that big of a deal. I'm not busting my ass all winter over it, nor am I missing out on any part of riding next summer for it.
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Old 10-28-2013, 12:38 PM   #32
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Basement floor

We finished our basement off a couple of years ago and did what you are looking at. 2" of hard foam over the walls, then we did put up framing and fibreglass batts. No moisture issues, and the space is quite a bit warmer. Rather than painting the floor we stained it with coffee grounds, copperas and water. Look here - http://www.stainedfloor.com/Iron_Recipes.html basically you stain the floor with rust. We sealed the floor with a clear sealer from Lowe's.

Pics of our sealed floor here - http://www.flickr.com/photos/jgreer916/5278912743/

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Old 10-28-2013, 01:23 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by jgreer916 View Post
We finished our basement off a couple of years ago and did what you are looking at. 2" of hard foam over the walls, then we did put up framing and fibreglass batts. No moisture issues, and the space is quite a bit warmer. Rather than painting the floor we stained it with coffee grounds, copperas and water. Look here - http://www.stainedfloor.com/Iron_Recipes.html basically you stain the floor with rust. We sealed the floor with a clear sealer from Lowe's.

Pics of our sealed floor here - http://www.flickr.com/photos/jgreer916/5278912743/

-john
That looks sweet, I think I want to try it. Thanks a lot for the tip.

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Old 12-08-2013, 12:15 PM   #34
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Finally got started. Decided on doing 1" sheets then overlapping them rather than 2", since it will be the same price except for glue. The 1" is much easier to cut anyways. Still haven't made up my mind on using fiberglass on top of that, but I'm thinking probably not. Either way I doubt I get that far this winter, I'll be happy just to get something done. It'll be riding season in a few months...



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Old 12-08-2013, 04:29 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jules083 View Post
Finally got started. Decided on doing 1" sheets then overlapping them rather than 2", since it will be the same price except for glue. The 1" is much easier to cut anyways. Still haven't made up my mind on using fiberglass on top of that, but I'm thinking probably not. Either way I doubt I get that far this winter, I'll be happy just to get something done. It'll be riding season in a few months...



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Glad you changed your mind for 2" foam. It would have been overkill.

Still would stop and buy 5Gallon of Dryloc and paint block.
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Old 12-08-2013, 05:35 PM   #36
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Glad you changed your mind for 2" foam. It would have been overkill.

Still would stop and buy 5Gallon of Dryloc and paint block.
For every person that said to use paint another person said not to. I don't know what the right answer is, but I didn't use it. One issue I heard off was the paint-to-block bond failing over time anyways. Since the insulation is glued, then any paint issue becomes a bigger problem.

Either way through, my dad's basement is painted with water sealing paint and it doesn't seem to do anything. Any leaks just bubbles the paint off and leaks anyways.

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Old 12-08-2013, 05:57 PM   #37
gsweave
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Originally Posted by jules083 View Post
For every person that said to use paint another person said not to. I don't know what the right answer is, but I didn't use it. One issue I heard off was the paint-to-block bond failing over time anyways. Since the insulation is glued, then any paint issue becomes a bigger problem.

Either way through, my dad's basement is painted with water sealing paint and it doesn't seem to do anything. Any leaks just bubbles the paint off and leaks anyways.

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Has not been my experience with dryloc.. But, you are living with it, I understand your choice.


Look at 3M Hi-strength spray adhesive. Great for your application http://www.homedepot.com/p/3M-17-6-o...0-24/100151277
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Old 12-08-2013, 06:02 PM   #38
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Has not been my experience with dryloc.. But, you are living with it, I understand your choice.
If I remember I'll stop by his place and get a picture of the interior wall. It's pretty obvious the paint isn't doing anything.

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Old 12-08-2013, 07:36 PM   #39
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Originally Posted by jules083 View Post
If I remember I'll stop by his place and get a picture of the interior wall. It's pretty obvious the paint isn't doing anything.

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The pics that we need are also the "before application". If the wall is the least bit scaly, dusty, chalky, powdery, or in any other way not a perfectly clean and well-attached (think resistant to wire brush) concrete, any paint will fail to perfectly adhere. With Drylok and it's ilk, perfection is more important than with "just" painting bare concrete.

The Drylok style paints will also fail if there is "too much" outside water pressure, around 11-12 psi is all it will take and that's not much when dealing with water columns (think scuba-diving). Sometimes the water is actually moving through the ground and the house is in the way, very high pressures can happen.

I suspect Drylok only lasts 12-15 years in the best of cases when dealing with active water (vs. just a damp wall in the rainy season). So removing the old Drylok stuff and reapplying is one "solution" to stop the water, for maybe another 8-12 years.

Sorry for the hijak as the OP isn't the one with the weeping wall.

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Old 12-09-2013, 12:42 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gsweave View Post
Glad you changed your mind for 2" foam. It would have been overkill.
FWIW the recommended R value of insulation for walls in your climate (Ohio) is R-10/13 for below-grade and R-20 for above-ground walls (and R-10 for slab floors, but too late...) according to the DoE. At R-6 per inch of most foam board products, that means about 4" on your walls (yours look to be mostly above ground) so you could layer 1 course of 2" board on top of your 1" and add a final 1" layer. Actually, if it were me I'd put up 2 courses of 2" since you have the open space. Remember that insulating material is usually the cheapest building material (considering all materials used) but is the most sensitive to proper install (e.g., high labor costs) so since you are providing the labor, go for a "best industry practice" since you have the chance.
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Old 12-09-2013, 03:41 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by StoneAgeMan View Post
The pics that we need are also the "before application". If the wall is the least bit scaly, dusty, chalky, powdery, or in any other way not a perfectly clean and well-attached (think resistant to wire brush) concrete, any paint will fail to perfectly adhere. With Drylok and it's ilk, perfection is more important than with "just" painting bare concrete.

The Drylok style paints will also fail if there is "too much" outside water pressure, around 11-12 psi is all it will take and that's not much when dealing with water columns (think scuba-diving). Sometimes the water is actually moving through the ground and the house is in the way, very high pressures can happen.

I suspect Drylok only lasts 12-15 years in the best of cases when dealing with active water (vs. just a damp wall in the rainy season). So removing the old Drylok stuff and reapplying is one "solution" to stop the water, for maybe another 8-12 years.

Sorry for the hijak as the OP isn't the one with the weeping wall.

StoneAge
Hmm....

Right now it would be no problem whatsoever, should I paint the walls with drylok? The only 2 sheets I have up are on above-grade walls, so paint there wouldn't be needed anyways.





Quote:
Originally Posted by zap2504 View Post
FWIW the recommended R value of insulation for walls in your climate (Ohio) is R-10/13 for below-grade and R-20 for above-ground walls (and R-10 for slab floors, but too late...) according to the DoE. At R-6 per inch of most foam board products, that means about 4" on your walls (yours look to be mostly above ground) so you could layer 1 course of 2" board on top of your 1" and add a final 1" layer. Actually, if it were me I'd put up 2 courses of 2" since you have the open space. Remember that insulating material is usually the cheapest building material (considering all materials used) but is the most sensitive to proper install (e.g., high labor costs) so since you are providing the labor, go for a "best industry practice" since you have the chance.
I'm at least going to hit the R-10 before drywall, might go more but haven't decided. Wouldn't hurt to at least do the front wall more, it's all above grade.

The slab is too late to get under it, I'm hoping to have something above it but haven't came up with how to do it yet. There's been a few options mentioned here, I'm sure something will get done. Doubt it'll be R-10 though.

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Old 12-09-2013, 04:29 PM   #42
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Hmm....




The slab is too late to get under it, I'm hoping to have something above it but haven't came up with how to do it yet. There's been a few options mentioned here, I'm sure something will get done. Doubt it'll be R-10 though.

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In my lower room I screwed 2x4's down with Tapcon screws on 2' centers and in filled with foil backed 2" foam boards (foil side up) topped with 3/4" tongue 'n grove ply. It's a toasty floor.
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Old 12-09-2013, 06:36 PM   #43
jules083 OP
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Originally Posted by mcma111 View Post
In my lower room I screwed 2x4's down with Tapcon screws on 2' centers and in filled with foil backed 2" foam boards (foil side up) topped with 3/4" tongue 'n grove ply. It's a toasty floor.
I thought of that, I'm worried about moisture soaking up through the floor and causing the 2x4's to rot. Any suggestions there? My slab fails the moisture test where you tape clear plastic down.

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Old 12-09-2013, 09:43 PM   #44
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Pressure treated wood.

Oh I also laid down a visqueen sheet first. But I'm on ancient sand. No water to worry about here.
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Old 12-10-2013, 04:46 AM   #45
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Originally Posted by jules083 View Post

The slab is too late to get under it, I'm hoping to have something above it but haven't came up with how to do it yet. There's been a few options mentioned here, I'm sure something will get done. Doubt it'll be R-10 though.

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http://www.gdldampproofing.com.au/in...nuitem&id=1008

You dont need to get under the slab to seal it, i got cerified with this product a while ago. I've only used it under comercial floor coverings where there has been a failure (probably missing) membrane under the slab.
I've also worked in hospitals, gov building ect... where it has been spec'd for showers, wet areas, labs, kitchens so it will moisture from coming in.

I dont know what the lacal version is called ow who makes but a call to a comercial flooring supplyer not retailer should get you some answers. Its fairly easy to install, i've put it on with a mop in two coats to get out of trouble after we had machinery fail repeatedly so it is a DIY alternative.

I have no idea about condensation but in our climate a cold slab cand condensation can be a symtom of an untreated slab and a water ingress problem... if there is an ingress problem it'l work.
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