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Old 11-15-2013, 09:08 PM   #16
JerryH
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I would buy the Scrambler on looks alone, even if it were not the best bike for the job. It's close enough, and looks so much better than a Tiger or KLR that I wouldn't even consider one of those.
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Old 11-24-2013, 07:36 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by JerryH View Post
I would buy the Scrambler on looks alone, even if it were not the best bike for the job. It's close enough, and looks so much better than a Tiger or KLR that I wouldn't even consider one of those.
Looks. That seems to be a recurring factor in buying a Scrambler.
I know looks are what sell Harleys,its all image. How can you see the bike going down the road? How long till the looks wear off?

I admit the looks of the Scrambler sucked me in, but after doing some 300/400 mile days the looks wore off. I added up everything it needed to be a functional traveling bike for even short trips and I bet 4000.00 in mods would be a decent start.

As long as a person is ok with throwing large wads of cash at a bike to make it something it isnt then a Scrambler could be good.

Kinda like a more modern airhead. 650 Strom may be an appliance but its a way better bike for actual useage day to day.
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Old 11-24-2013, 07:37 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by JerryH View Post
I would buy the Scrambler on looks alone, even if it were not the best bike for the job. It's close enough, and looks so much better than a Tiger or KLR that I wouldn't even consider one of those.
I notice you dont own one though? Would look nice next to the Vulcan.
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Old 11-24-2013, 08:40 AM   #19
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Scrambler owner here. I agree with the previous poster that you want to and easily can dump money into these bikes. I will soon have invested the original cost of the bike in modifications. Don't care. This bike is a blank slate ready for going into many different directions. I've re-done it twice and I'm buying parts to have another go.

I've had plenty of bikes in my day. I'm getting ready to sell the last of them off with the exception of my Scram. I might just keep it after I've given up riding in my old age just to screw around with.

I don't tour anymore and personally have never done long distance on the Scrambler. However, I have talked to guys over the years at Vintage Motorcycle Days in Lexington, Ohio who got there on Scramblers from all over the country. They always report that it's bulletproof. Biggest complaint is wind on open highways.

Is it a touring bike? Since I'm an old coot from simpler times I'd say yes. Years ago you didn't need metal luggage to go places. Two guys I know bought Yamaha 650's right after high school and each with a boyscout backpack and sleeping bag rode from Ohio to California and back.
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Old 11-24-2013, 10:18 AM   #20
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Thanks for the varied and insightful opinions. I'm currently leaning toward the Scrambler and adding a windshield and rack/sissy bar. I figure that would meet my needs of approx. 80% commuting/ around town, and 20% touring.
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Old 11-24-2013, 10:50 AM   #21
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Wait for the 2015

Sure we will see a new Scrambler for 2015 with seriously upgraded engine etc.... so wait
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Old 11-24-2013, 09:35 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Foot dragger View Post
Looks. That seems to be a recurring factor in buying a Scrambler.
I know looks are what sell Harleys,its all image. How can you see the bike going down the road? How long till the looks wear off?

I admit the looks of the Scrambler sucked me in, but after doing some 300/400 mile days the looks wore off. I added up everything it needed to be a functional traveling bike for even short trips and I bet 4000.00 in mods would be a decent start.

As long as a person is ok with throwing large wads of cash at a bike to make it something it isnt then a Scrambler could be good.

Kinda like a more modern airhead. 650 Strom may be an appliance but its a way better bike for actual useage day to day.
I do think looks are an important selling factor for the entire classic twin line. If there were more bikes like it maybe we'd look to those also. But the classic twins are very much like a Harley (or an old school standard bike) in that it's a clean slate to make into what you envision it to be. With today's highly stylized and pre-segmented bikes you better like it or tear it down to bare bones and start over to get anything else.

I thought long and hard about restyling my Vstrom 1k. I loved a great deal about it, but the styling mostly left me cold. I seriously considered a complete revamp on the styling and have the means to accomplish it, but in the end the task was so complex it was easier to sell it and move onto something else that tugged at my heart strings more.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeephoto View Post
Thanks for the varied and insightful opinions. I'm currently leaning toward the Scrambler and adding a windshield and rack/sissy bar. I figure that would meet my needs of approx. 80% commuting/ around town, and 20% touring.
Another factor that often gets lost here on ADVrider is, not everybody wants a bike for a tour to Alaska or 600 mile days. I do realize this is the mecca for the longer distance crowd and fully appreciate that, but as pointed out in the post above, maybe 20% of the intended use "may" be longer distance touring. The balance of the bike's use might be local riding, be it for pleasure or commuting. In addition a great many posters here have multiple bikes so a Scrambler many not need to perform all duties at 80%+ functionality.

I'm looking at a Scrambler to slot in between my other bikes and provide that strong emotional excitement and fun to ride factor my KLR just won't ever have. Granted my Stelvio does provide quite a bit of that but I really would like to own another vintage type/styled bike, especially one that readily lends itself to customizing.

I'm looking for the modern technology built vintage bike to replace what my Norton Commando wasn't quite. I test rode an Enfield Bullet 500 classic thinking it might provide what I was looking for. Unfortunately Enfield hasn't made enough changes to progress and the bike still rides like a 1950s bike, plus they want $6k for one. It's worth about the $3,500 they sell for in India. The Triumph classic twins actually perform to modern standards at very attractive prices, which is what makes them so friggen attractive to many.
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Old 11-25-2013, 03:53 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Foot dragger View Post
Looks. That seems to be a recurring factor in buying a Scrambler.
I know looks are what sell Harleys,its all image. How can you see the bike going down the road? How long till the looks wear off?

I admit the looks of the Scrambler sucked me in, but after doing some 300/400 mile days the looks wore off. I added up everything it needed to be a functional traveling bike for even short trips and I bet 4000.00 in mods would be a decent start.

As long as a person is ok with throwing large wads of cash at a bike to make it something it isnt then a Scrambler could be good.

Kinda like a more modern airhead. 650 Strom may be an appliance but its a way better bike for actual useage day to day.
Foot Dragger, what follows is not personally directed at you, so please bare with me.

Despite what anyone says, the Scrambler is plenty capable of saddle sore type days. The rider, however, may not be capable of such days. Too many people around here fall into this mentality that a machine has to be perfectly comfortable for them to ride 500 mile days without so much as a sore ass. If it won't do that, then they think the machine isn't capable.

This mentality is bullshit. We call this "adventure" for a reason. RTWdoug has done more on an old Indian than most people here will do in their entire lives. That Indian lacked butt massagers, heated grips, and the usual $3k of Touratech accessories that most seem to think are required to ride to the grocery store around here. Adventure is all about taking what you've got and doing great things with it. If it doesn't challenge you, then you aren't on an adventure.

I just sold my 60's Triumphs....hardtail chops no less. They were just as capable of 500 mile days as my modern Bonnie, my Ural, and even my Husky. Quite frankly, they were more fun to do those rides too. At the end of a 500mi day on my Husky, I've simply reached my destination. But with my old bikes, I've freaking accomplished something at the end of a 500 mile day. You can't replace that feeling with panniers, fuel injection, and butt warmers.

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Old 11-25-2013, 05:18 AM   #24
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I've posted elsewhere that if I had to choose 1 bike to keep and live with from now on from all of them in my collection, it would likely be the Scram. It just does everything quite nicely. Not outstanding in any one area, but does a good job all around, including the looks department.

And...for me anyhow, it's the most comfortable bike I own. I can spend longer in the saddle on the Scram than any other.

Sure it's no Harley for touring, nor Duc for sport bike work, nor XR for trail duty....but then again the Harley would suck on the trail nor could it cut a line like the Duc.

If you remember the term UJM from the 70's and 80's, 'universal Japanese morotrycle', I'd say the new Triumphs are a reincarnation of that, the Scram just adds a bit of style as well.
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Old 11-25-2013, 06:42 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by RidingDonkeys View Post
Foot Dragger, what follows is not personally directed at you, so please bare with me.

Despite what anyone says, the Scrambler is plenty capable of saddle sore type days. The rider, however, may not be capable of such days. Too many people around here fall into this mentality that a machine has to be perfectly comfortable for them to ride 500 mile days without so much as a sore ass. If it won't do that, then they think the machine isn't capable.

This mentality is bullshit. We call this "adventure" for a reason. RTWdoug has done more on an old Indian than most people here will do in their entire lives. That Indian lacked butt massagers, heated grips, and the usual $3k of Touratech accessories that most seem to think are required to ride to the grocery store around here. Adventure is all about taking what you've got and doing great things with it. If it doesn't challenge you, then you aren't on an adventure.

I just sold my 60's Triumphs....hardtail chops no less. They were just as capable of 500 mile days as my modern Bonnie, my Ural, and even my Husky. Quite frankly, they were more fun to do those rides too. At the end of a 500mi day on my Husky, I've simply reached my destination. But with my old bikes, I've freaking accomplished something at the end of a 500 mile day. You can't replace that feeling with panniers, fuel injection, and butt warmers.

Sent from the voices in my head and transcribed by their drinking buddy...
this has got to be the best and most honest thing i have read on this forum since i've joined.
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Old 11-25-2013, 07:15 AM   #26
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I've read elsewhere that the Scram would not make as good an Adventure bike as a BMW GS. Honestly, how the hell do they figure that???? Is the GS lighter...no...is the GS easier to handle in the tight stuff..no...So what exactly is it the GS would do better?? Eat up highway miles? maybe, it does have a bigger tank and can carry more crap. so if that is really the case, then the whole adventure bike argument is irrelevant, you're just looking for a touring bike. Any tourer can take a gravel road if need be, do you really need a GS for that.

This Scram is far more capable to do anything than any bike was 40 years ago, and people did everything then that they are doing now. So really, to RidingDonkeys point, suck it up buttercup.

Now if the question was, should I be getting an XT225 to go from Keywest to Alaska, that could spark a debate, although it is doable.
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Old 11-25-2013, 11:36 AM   #27
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All this talk makes me want a Scram.
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Old 11-25-2013, 11:41 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by lrutt View Post
If you remember the term UJM from the 70's and 80's, 'universal Japanese morotrycle', I'd say the new Triumphs are a reincarnation of that, the Scram just adds a bit of style as well.
I'd agree 100%.

I truly miss the "UJMs" and other standard style bikes. So many of today's preconceived bikes don't offer enough flexibility in use or reconfiguration by the owner into what he wants the bike to be.

It may require more money to get a standard bike configured for your needs, but at least it's feasible and often easier than trying to reconfigure something else. Just try to reconfigure something like a Vstrom or Versys, let alone something like most modern sport bikes.

I hope Honda sells a ton of CB1100s to help open up the UJM market, but unfortunately I don't see too many on the road yet. Now that they adjusted the price into reality maybe more will sell. I find it quite appealing but the Triumph classic line appeals to me more and there's no comparing the aftermarket support. Triumph has been at it a long time.
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Old 11-25-2013, 11:45 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by Jeephoto View Post
I want a Triumph Scrambler to replace my KLR, but I have one reservation. How is the Scrambler for touring?

I love the looks of the Scram; especially the red and silver. It would be perfect around town, commuting, and attracting attention. It will handle all the gravel and dirt roads I would want to explore. The parallel twin has plenty of power and the lower seat height and center of gravity should be more suited to me than the KLR.

I just worry about the Scrambler for touring; 100+ daytrips or 500+ overnighters.

I'm leaning toward the Tiger 800 road version for that factor alone.

Opinions, please?
I thought the KLR was a touring bike. If it isn't, then there sure a whole lot of people out there doing it wrong.

I've done 3,000+ miles in six days on a DR650. According to popular opinion, KLR is supposed to be the better touring rig of the two. It certainly has much better wind protection. I'd tour with that.

Thus concludes my opinion.
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Old 11-25-2013, 01:46 PM   #30
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I guess I don't fit the Adventure Rider definition. I really feel like it's an adventure to me when my son on his Tiger XC800 and me on my KLR get out of DFW and explore the County and Farm to Market roads. Both bikes do this well, it's just when we need to jump on the freeways that I would rather have a multi cylinder bike. Some of the rides we would like to do (Texas coast and Hill Country, SE Oklahoma, New Mexico) will require slabbing it to save time.

True, KLRs are ridden all over the world. But I haven't and don't want to, put alot of money into creating my ideal bike.
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