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Old 11-16-2013, 11:46 PM   #16
metale OP
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I kept the same gear from the previous 2 corners, so a downshift wasn't the cause. I remember being sitting agains the tank tho, and also being leaned to the inside front (helmet chin near my left hand).

I'm already almost good for another one, as they say around here. As for the trusty cbr, the bent shift lever is out, new one is ordered and I'm fighting the rear blinker to get it back on. This is a big thing for me, as I'm not mechanicaly inclined at all nor do I have any tool sets worthy of that name.

I can take a pic of the bike as is, if anyone wants.
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Old 11-17-2013, 09:23 AM   #17
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So, shift pedal is ordered at Honda, got to take the bent one out.

The damage to the fairings is a bit more than the adrenaline let me initialy see. Here's she:












The bar end toke quite a hit.


Overall, not too bad considering the slide.


Footpeg assembly out


The shift pedal is held by a snap-ring. Had to buy a plier to remove it.

Could not use it as intended (to spread the ends of the snap-ring/clip), ended up grabing the round part of it and it pulled right out

Bent pedal



Trying to put the blinker back on:



Toke quite a fight, but it blinks. Let's see how long it holds there. The licence plate was already cracked.


Also:
  • Cleaned the chain with a brush, and lubed it.
  • Alligned the rear wheel (was off by 2mm), and retightened both axles to spec.


Still to do before riding:
  • Install new shift pedal.
  • Re-set tire pressures.
  • Check engine oil level.
  • Clean the whole bike.
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Old 11-18-2013, 12:47 PM   #18
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Glad to hear you are ok and are getting on with repairing the CBR, it's a very good bike to learn on and very capable (also crashes well and is cheap / easy to repair).
My feedback as follows (remember I wasn't there and am only interpreting the info on this thread).

Bikes don't crash, riders crash. You somehow made this happen.
In your first post you mention the bike feeling twitchy, this is a symptom of something not being right, possibly tyre pressures (too high), cold weather / hard tyre lacking grip? or you feeling a bit too tense on the bike?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jimhaleyscomet View Post
Being forward adds much weight to the front wheel while unloading the rear.
This comment is correct, you manage grip on either front or rear by shifting weight, with weight forward the rear will slide, with weight back the front will slide. I'm not suggesting you try and slide the tyres, just be aware of how your motorcycle works.

Looking at the pics of your rear tyre it appears you are a cautious rider, there is little apparent wear towards the edge of the tyre. That's fine, it's how we all start out learning but supports my comment about the crash, I suspect you had to much weight forward, the rear slid and unfortunately you did not recognise the start of the slide in time to correct it.
Something to remember next time!

A couple of suggestions:
Check your tyre pressures, maybe in colder weather set them a bit softer as this will keep the tyres hotter / more grip?
Check how good your tyres are, original equipment tyres can be a bit hard for long life but may lack grip, talk to the motorcycle shop guys and get a couple of opinions.
Make sure your suspension is set correctly (I don't know how adjustable the CBR is), too hard a suspension will result in losing traction / grip on uneven roads.

Training, get some, you can never have enough.
Practise slow speed car park manouvers, look up "Captain Crash" on Youtube, there is a lot to learn from him.

Last... the gear shift lever is mild steel, just bend it back into shape, hammer and vice is all you need, and buy some crash bungs to minimise damage!

Enjoy the next ride!
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Old 11-18-2013, 01:24 PM   #19
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Thank you for your feedback. I try to learn as much as I can, I've only rode a motorcycle for the 1st time 5 months ago, when I bought the cbr.

Concerning the bike, the suspension is not adjustable, neither rear or front. The tires are not oem, they are 10mm wider than stock. Still narrow enough to keep the twitchyness (common complain with this bike, and adressed by Honda on the following model).

This wasn't a hot morning, but neither a very cold one. I had been riding for about one hour and not that slow. I have dificulty understanding how the tires could be too cold (these are basically scooter tires, not race tires), but may as well accept it.

The tire is still near-new. It has done 5.000km, and similar tires have been seen to do nearly 20.000km on these motorcycles. The middle part has plenty of thread, the grey-ish zone is not baldness, it's just white stone-dust from the entrance to the garage. I intend to replace them when budget allows, with something like metzeler M5s to slow the steering.

Bottom line is, I crashed it, I want to fix it as soon as possible and keep on learning.
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Old 11-18-2013, 03:53 PM   #20
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I keep thinking, "something on the road". You were on a curvy road, and diesel fuel or some other similar product could have been in the asphalt. Reason for this speculation is I lost traction suddenly while exiting a curve. Looking back at it, there was some slippery stuff on the road. Luckily, I pulled out of it, despite both wheels sliding sideways for a second of a lifetime. It wasn't obvious as I entered and exited the curve - no roadway discoleration. I know another incident where two rider friends lost traction and did crash because of fuel oil on the roadway. A one time spill is not easy to spot.

It's hard to loose traction on a curve, unless you're really booking around the corners and dragging pegs.
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Old 11-18-2013, 09:51 PM   #21
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The road where this happened is used by many trucks on work-days. Could have been diesel on the road, or oil, orr resin, or just my lack of experience.

I had a car crash 11 years ago which involved tree resin. But looking back to that one, I had time to react, even though I was a new driver at the time. With this one, as soon as I knew something was wrong, I was already on the ground, it was really fast.
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Old 11-19-2013, 11:04 AM   #22
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On corner entry there isn't much you can do to lose the rear end so suddenly unless you were adding throttle + lean angle (which you weren't) or using the rear brake to heavily (which you weren't doing either).

The seating position on your CBR doesn't give you enough space to move forward so far that it would unload the rear tire (unlike what you could do on a flat track bike). Unless you somehow got your head so far forward it was over the wind screen. And you said you were slightly on throttle to hold your speed steady so the front wasn't all that heavily loaded if you had at least some throttle applied.

Since you said you were riding at a pretty fast pace you were probably looking pretty far ahead. So it was probably something on the road that you didn't see.

Tires could have played a part in it, especially if that was the lowest you've ever gotten the bike leaned. The smooth surface of fresh rubber is slick until it gets scuffed in especially when cold. Cold weather will always reduce grip but a street tire should still have quite a bit of grip. Lowering tire pressure wouldn't do anything, you might get an extra 5 degrees F in the tire which wouldn't have much of an effect at all on the street. I ride in below freezing temps on my gsxr-600 with track day tires (Dunlop 211GP at 36psi) and have gotten to some very low lean angles without slipping.

I would take a VERY detailed look at your rear suspension for any sort of play in the bearings and that the rear shock is operating smoothly.
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Old 11-19-2013, 11:25 AM   #23
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Correct on all accounts.

I was stable on the throttle as to avoid engine braking (which is strong on this bike, unlike the 13hp engine :) )

Is there such thing as too much counter-steering? I'm thinking if I could have upset the rear through it, like some micro-correction I may have unintentionally done?

Because apart from body placement, countersteer was the only input I was giving the CBR.
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Old 11-28-2013, 12:11 AM   #24
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You can counter-steer to quickly but only if the surface conditions are poor or when the tires are cold. It still makes the front end let go however, not the rear.
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Old 11-28-2013, 08:51 PM   #25
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It seems a lot of these posted mishaps involve sweeping left hand turns on smooth roads. Maybe there's a natural tendency during the weight shift and extra g-force to push your left foot down and causing an unintended downshift? Just a thought.
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Old 11-29-2013, 01:49 AM   #26
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I don't think that was the case, because I have a bad riding tecnique: I ride with the ball of my feet on the footpegs, instead of the center/heel of my feet. This means I have to move my feet forward on the footpegs to shift or (rear-)brake.

I also haven't felt anything upsetting the drivetrain or any difference in engine rpm/sound before the fall.
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