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Old 01-19-2014, 02:29 PM   #76
Apple Jam
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PBRider View Post
.....Nothing worse then feeling you were left behind.....
Almost as bad are guys that were behind me, we'd been riding the buddy system all day, and they decide to take a different route back to camp. I waited at the next intersection like I'd been doing all day, and when I didn't see them, I'd head back looking. After not finding them back to the previous intersection where I saw them last, I'm left assuming they went off the road. Spent an hour on one guy and two hours on the other before giving up. So.....when I get back to camp LATE, they're already fed and half-drunk......then I get to hear "oh, my GPS found a better route". Hmmm. Thanks, fuckers. I missed dinner and my 6pm coctail looking for your inconsiderate ass.

Do NOT leave a group without letting anyone know. They probly will/should go looking for you.
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Originally Posted by KillerD View Post
........ All for the ride as fast as you want and take in the scenery whenever you hit an intersection.
I ride faster and more aggressive than many. And then I happily stop at the next intersection, take a pee, look at maps, take pictures etc. Got no problem waiting.....as long as you eventually make it,...or else I'ma comin' back for ya
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Old 01-20-2014, 12:13 PM   #77
jcloer1 OP
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Totally agree!

Man I wish you were able to make this ride Apple Jam! Sorry the dates don't line up for you. :(

This will be a first OBDR for many of us and some of us are still pretty new to the sport as well. I enjoy pushing my skills and will likely do so on any side routes we find from camp, but generally speaking I will just be poking along, enjoying the ride. And...currently it looks like my wife will be joining us! She has never been on a dirt bike, so my hope is to pick her up a TW200 or something similar (in seat height and rider comfort). We'll spend as many days as possible riding in the coast range to prepare both of us for this trip, but we will certainly not be speed demons amongst the group! :)

And...I am all about the intersection meet ups. I will have a GPS and a SPOT, but nothing beats keeping eyes on each other.
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Old 01-23-2014, 11:15 AM   #78
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+1 on Apple Jams comments and attitude.

Be considerate of your fellow riders and agree on what/how you're going to do this BEFORE you start. Communication beforehand is key. Rode this last year on my KLR, awesome trip had a great time. Have fun, looking forward to your future RR.
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Old 01-23-2014, 12:28 PM   #79
mrmagoolin
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I rode the OBCDR section 5 with Apple Jam. What he says is the way it should be done. There are ways to speed it up some and not leave any one behind. If you wait for everybody at all the intersections no matter how fast you ride, you will cut your distance down. This is very true the larger the group. I suggest that you have a time (about an hour) so that when that time has elapsed your leader picks the intersection and waits for everyone. In between this time period you always wait for the rider behind you at every intersection, and then you go when you know that person is there. I worked out with the guy who was usually behind me a signal system. I would park in the intersection facing where I needed to go. When the next rider saw me he would give me the arm signal of the direction that he needed to turn. I knew he saw me and where to go and would then go on and he would wait for the next rider. If everyone does this it helps to speed it up a little.
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Old 01-23-2014, 05:17 PM   #80
Rick
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Originally Posted by mrmagoolin View Post
I rode the OBCDR section 5 with Apple Jam. What he says is the way it should be done. There are ways to speed it up some and not leave any one behind. If you wait for everybody at all the intersections no matter how fast you ride, you will cut your distance down. This is very true the larger the group. I suggest that you have a time (about an hour) so that when that time has elapsed your leader picks the intersection and waits for everyone. In between this time period you always wait for the rider behind you at every intersection, and then you go when you know that person is there. I worked out with the guy who was usually behind me a signal system. I would park in the intersection facing where I needed to go. When the next rider saw me he would give me the arm signal of the direction that he needed to turn. I knew he saw me and where to go and would then go on and he would wait for the next rider. If everyone does this it helps to speed it up a little.
Read the RR that you guys put up on your ride. Sounded like you guys had a great time. Also sounded like the OOHVA maps weren't particularly useful. I've got the tracks from Treknow but I don't like relying on GPS alone.

I've done this type of intersection waiting thing with other rides and it worked great. I'm not sure who'll be leading this ride, if anyone but we'll make the suggestion.

Sounded like the dinners you did were group meals. Personally, I think I'd rather depend on myself for food, why did you guys decide to do it that way?

I also read some of the bigger bikes were pushing nearly 800-900 lbs. I found that shocking. Were you guys carrying a LOT of stuff? I want to travel as light as possible. Any tips on things you wish you didn't carry or did?

Thanks,
Rick
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Old 01-23-2014, 08:34 PM   #81
Apple Jam
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Man I wish you were able to make this ride Apple Jam! Sorry the dates don't line up for you.
Me too. I need to ride that North section I skipped out on....and ride a whole lot more "interesting" roads while I'm near there. There is a whole lot more to Oregon than the OBDR, and a whole lot of it is calling me.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrmagoolin View Post
I worked out with the guy who was usually behind me a signal system. I would park in the intersection facing where I needed to go. When the next rider saw me he would give me the arm signal of the direction that he needed to turn. I knew he saw me and where to go and would then go on and he would wait for the next rider. If everyone does this it helps to speed it up a little.
That made a big difference in the travel time, signal and move, rather than wait for the full stop at each intersection. You can't assume the rider sees you just because they're close to the intersection. Remember, they're kinda busy, slowing down and watching the road. Wait for their visual signal so they know which fork to ride. "wait until you see the whites of their eyes"....then wait more for a visual signal from them. I've heard some say they just leave a big roost mark and ride on. I'm not really comfortable with just that alone.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick's KLR View Post
Read the RR that you guys put up on your ride. Sounded like you guys had a great time. Also sounded like the OOHVA maps weren't particularly useful. I've got the tracks from Treknow but I don't like relying on GPS alone.

I've done this type of intersection waiting thing with other rides and it worked great. I'm not sure who'll be leading this ride, if anyone but we'll make the suggestion.

Sounded like the dinners you did were group meals. Personally, I think I'd rather depend on myself for food, why did you guys decide to do it that way?

I also read some of the bigger bikes were pushing nearly 800-900 lbs. I found that shocking. Were you guys carrying a LOT of stuff? I want to travel as light as possible. Any tips on things you wish you didn't carry or did?

Thanks,
Rick
Bring at least an Atlas in addition to the GPS, it won't have every bad road in it, but it might get you out of a jam. I usually bring many FS maps also, but sometimes get lazy. Everyone was certainly planning on doing their own food, primarily Mountain House freeze-dried for most, until they realized I was cooking real decent food most all nights, and most shared.

I'm 800-900 lbs easy when I ride loaded, but I have a 990. I did learn to pack less clothes on that ride. You don't need them; EVERYTHING gets dirty anyway, so who cares HOW dirty? One pair of warm pants, shorts, a T-shirt and 2 pairs of socks, one to ride in, and one pair to camp in. KEEP your feet DRY. I found that out the hard way and got a bit of athlete's foot on that ride. I also pack LOTS of water, a filter, and a soft cooler with ice and whiskey, cheese and meats, and a campchair. You know,...truly important stuff
I am a BMW camper in a KTM world,
...but one that isn't afraid of a few (or a lot of !!) scratches and dents.

Fast and light is fine for some, but then the camping just isn't as enjoyable or comfortable. And motels and restaurants are just plain OUT for me; why would I wanna go to a city for the night, when I've been in the backcountry all day? As fun as DS riding is, the time spent camping with new friends and enjoying the evening campfire time in close to car-camping like comfort is easily as important for me. It's not just about "riding the OBDR" (or whatever) for me, it's about the week-long backcountry experience that I'm a part of, and the actual "route" and it's destination is really just less important.
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On the other hand, if it has been logged or mined and roads already exist,,
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Old 01-23-2014, 08:47 PM   #82
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple Jam View Post
Me too. I need to ride that North section I skipped out on....and ride a whole lot more "interesting" roads while I'm near there. There is a whole lot more to Oregon than the OBDR, and a whole lot of it is calling me.

That made a big difference in the travel time, signal and move, rather than wait for the full stop at each intersection. You can't assume the rider sees you just because they're close to the intersection. Remember, they're kinda busy, slowing down and watching the road. Wait for their visual signal so they know which fork to ride. "wait until you see the whites of their eyes"....then wait more for a visual signal from them. I've heard some say they just leave a big roost mark and ride on. I'm not really comfortable with just that alone.

Bring at least an Atlas in addition to the GPS, it won't have every bad road in it, but it might get you out of a jam. I usually bring many FS maps also, but sometimes get lazy. Everyone was certainly planning on doing their own food, primarily Mountain House freeze-dried for most, until they realized I was cooking real decent food most all nights, and most shared.

I'm 800-900 lbs easy when I ride loaded, but I have a 990. I did learn to pack less clothes on that ride. You don't need them; EVERYTHING gets dirty anyway, so who cares HOW dirty? One pair of warm pants, shorts, a T-shirt and 2 pairs of socks, one to ride in, and one pair to camp in. KEEP your feet DRY. I found that out the hard way and got a bit of athlete's foot on that ride. I also pack LOTS of water, a filter, and a soft cooler with ice and whiskey, cheese and meats, and a campchair. You know,...truly important stuff
I am a BMW camper in a KTM world,
...but one that isn't afraid of a few (or a lot of !!) scratches and dents.

Fast and light is fine for some, but then the camping just isn't as enjoyable or comfortable. And motels and restaurants are just plain OUT for me; why would I wanna go to a city for the night, when I've been in the backcountry all day? As fun as DS riding is, the time spent camping with new friends and enjoying the evening campfire time in close to car-camping like comfort is easily as important for me. It's not just about "riding the OBDR" (or whatever) for me, it's about the week-long backcountry experience that I'm a part of, and the actual "route" and it's destination is really just less important.
Good post AJ. One of my favorite things to do is backpacking and the group I usually go with is all about food and drink. We end up usually around 55 lbs in our pack including good food, horerves and several bags of wine. I've also got plenty of light backpacking gear. I do have the OOHVA maps but I don't think I'd bring them. They don't look that sturdy. I do think they would be good to mark another map/atlas though that may not have the detail.

I agree, I plan on enjoying the great outdoors while doing something like this. I'm not into credit card touring unless the wife is with me.
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Old 01-23-2014, 09:22 PM   #83
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Originally Posted by Rick's KLR View Post
Good post AJ. One of my favorite things to do is backpacking and the group I usually go with is all about food and drink. We end up usually around 55 lbs in our pack including good food, horerves and several bags of wine. I've also got plenty of light backpacking gear. I do have the OOHVA maps but I don't think I'd bring them. They don't look that sturdy. I do think they would be good to mark another map/atlas though that may not have the detail.

I agree, I plan on enjoying the great outdoors while doing something like this. I'm not into credit card touring unless the wife is with me.
Agreed! Great post AJ!
The riding is a big part of the excitement for me (largely because its still so new to me!), but at least as much of the trip will be enjoying the wilderness and then getting to know new, like minded peeps who I can start planning more adventures with! :)
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Old 01-23-2014, 09:38 PM   #84
Apple Jam
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Agreed! Great post AJ!
The riding is a big part of the excitement for me (largely because its still so new to me!), but at least as much of the trip will be enjoying the wilderness and then getting to know new, like minded peeps who I can start planning more adventures with! :)
When the seven of us rode the OBDR 5 (OBCDR clicky), two of them had never camped cowboy-camp style (dispersed no-where camping). They were expecting campgrounds and at least vault toilets along the way. Well.....one didn't shit for the first three days, because he had actually NEVER wagged his ass over the grass before. I was kinda blown away by that, but I'm a country boy, and I pee out my front door if I wanna.

Reading all of your responses makes me wanna join this group even more. I think you guys are gonna have a good time together But as I posted above, I'll be taking two weeks off with my wife to ride far and wide (whereEVER she wants to go) in August already, and the finances are faaaar from accommodating another week off with you hooligans

But lemme tellya,....I'll be hounding y'all for an RR, and likely (hopefully) seeing many of you at "Barlow or Bust; 2014" this June, where I first met JCloer1 last year. Details coming soon......
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On the other hand, if it has been logged or mined and roads already exist,,
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Old 01-23-2014, 10:04 PM   #85
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When the seven of us rode the OBDR 5 (OBCDR clicky), two of them had never camped cowboy-camp style (dispersed no-where camping). They were expecting campgrounds and at least vault toilets along the way. Well.....one didn't shit for the first three days, because he had actually NEVER wagged his ass over the grass before. I was kinda blown away by that, but I'm a country boy, and I pee out my front door if I wanna.

Reading all of your responses makes me wanna join this group even more. I think you guys are gonna have a good time together But as I posted above, I'll be taking two weeks off with my wife to ride far and wide (whereEVER she wants to go) in August already, and the finances are faaaar from accommodating another week off with you hooligans

But lemme tellya,....I'll be hounding y'all for an RR, and likely (hopefully) seeing many of you at "Barlow or Bust; 2014" this June, where I first met JCloer1 last year. Details coming soon......

lmao! That's hard to imagine...but I'm a bit of a hillbilly myself. I can't tell you how many times I've peed next to my truck in the driveway. :)

Looking forward to deets on the Barlow trip! I HOPE I can make it again, but it depends on the dates (I already have a week long trip planned in late June). I'll try to make at least a day or two anyway and see if I can drag 1Patriot along too!

Looking at TW200's to get my wife on board so we can do lots 'o Oregon exploring too! Can't wait to hear about the trip with your wife!

I have to remember to buy a machined aluminum housing for my GoPro so I can do video RR's. I lost my camera on a ride outside of Bend last year when the mount broke...my buddy went back the next morning and found it!
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Old 01-23-2014, 10:48 PM   #86
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Pretty funny, must be a guy thing. We moved from Gaston to Hillsboro and I tell my wife the thing I miss most about living out in Gaston was the ability to take a piss in my own yard.

I really liked the TW200. I almost bought one before I got my XT250. Fun little bike. Good starter bike for you wife I think. Resell is easy also if she decides she wants more power later. Hard to find them used for a good price.

I think we should get together sometime in Feb and start the planning off over a beer or two.
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Old 01-23-2014, 11:02 PM   #87
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Pretty funny, must be a guy thing. We moved from Gaston to Hillsboro and I tell my wife the thing I miss most about living out in Gaston was the ability to take a piss in my own yard.

I really liked the TW200. I almost bought one before I got my XT250. Fun little bike. Good starter bike for you wife I think. Resell is easy also if she decides she wants more power later. Hard to find them used for a good price.

I think we should get together sometime in Feb and start the planning off over a beer or two.

:) Yep, I think it will be a great starter for her and a fun second for me! Hee hee!

I'm game for getting together in February. I'm available Feb 2nd, the weekend of the 8th and the weekend of the 22nd. Anyone who is interested in starting off with a meet/greet and beginning to plan logistics, this is a good chance to get an early start...
Chime in with dates and location ideas!
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Old 01-24-2014, 06:45 AM   #88
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I really liked the TW200. I almost bought one before I got my XT250.
Would suggest that you go with the XT as well. They are basically the same bike but the TW has the big tires. But the XT is able to obtain higher speeds and makes necessary road riding much more injoyable.
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Old 01-24-2014, 08:13 AM   #89
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Would suggest that you go with the XT as well. They are basically the same bike but the TW has the big tires. But the XT is able to obtain higher speeds and makes necessary road riding much more injoyable.

I think if it were just my second bike I would go with either the XT250 or the KLX250, but my wife has never been on a dirt bike in her life. She originally sat on an XT at the dealership and liked it for seat height and comfort, so it is definitely still in the top two choices. I'm just thinking that the TW might be the perfect first bike as it has less power, more stable tires and low gearing (things I have read on forums from riders, not personal experience). She has been a little hesitant anyway, so I want her first bike to be something she can be very comfortable with right out of the gate and gain confidence quickly...

That being said...my XR650L is the only dirt bike I've been on in 25 years and I've only been on it a dozen or so times since I bought it last April (including a handful of ADV days mixed in), so I welcome any and all tips, opinions, etc.! A noob talking his wife into becoming a noob!
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Old 01-24-2014, 08:55 AM   #90
Rick
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I think if it were just my second bike I would go with either the XT250 or the KLX250, but my wife has never been on a dirt bike in her life. She originally sat on an XT at the dealership and liked it for seat height and comfort, so it is definitely still in the top two choices. I'm just thinking that the TW might be the perfect first bike as it has less power, more stable tires and low gearing (things I have read on forums from riders, not personal experience). She has been a little hesitant anyway, so I want her first bike to be something she can be very comfortable with right out of the gate and gain confidence quickly...

That being said...my XR650L is the only dirt bike I've been on in 25 years and I've only been on it a dozen or so times since I bought it last April (including a handful of ADV days mixed in), so I welcome any and all tips, opinions, etc.! A noob talking his wife into becoming a noob!
The XT225 can be found pretty easily on craigslist and it's no more powerful than the TW but has 6 speed gearbox and can easily do 70 on the highway. It's also lighter than the TW and the same height. I think it has a bigger tank as well.

http://salem.craigslist.org/mcy/4258719773.html $2900
Bought for his wife. Only 1500 miles.

http://portland.craigslist.org/mlt/mcy/4299614824.html TW200 $3250 with a rack.

Might also consider a Kawasaki KLR250. Very nice bike same height as the others and bulletproof. http://corvallis.craigslist.org/mcy/4300627783.html only $2000.

Lots of options...
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