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Old 01-29-2013, 11:08 AM   #31
AviatorTroy
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Everybody likes these big expensive training courses involving BMW and the like.

I suggest getting a 250 and learning to ride dirt before tackling it on a 500+ pound monster. Build that confidence up with a smaller bike and its a lot less exhausting. Then when you hit those technical sections with the big bike you've seen it before..

Also suggest riding with some people who are experienced dirt riders with some racing background, the only way you get better at riding street, dirt, or track is riding with some people that are a lot better than you. It does wonders.

A GS is a fine street ride with some off road capability but it stands to be repeated that it is far from a beginners bike and people who have a hard time with it are usually the type with more money than experience. No reflection upon the OP at all, just sayin'.
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Old 01-29-2013, 03:14 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by r'elise me View Post
So who's the killer coach in LA preferably without an insurance policy that's going to give me the real low down on a private multi day training ride(s) with camping, bike setup, navigation, control techniques. I'll put my money on his students any day...especially if I'm one of em .

Rawhide and the like = pamper group-ass for an entire weekend. Just shoot me in the head please. There's something just too 'midlife crisis" about a bunch of 50 year old noobs on BMW's trying to discover adventure that kinda reminds me of high school PE class - valuable knowledge imparted surely but equally sure there's a ton of bullshit related to lawyer and insurance company concerns. Hate that shit. I like the school that's more "shut up and ride" in style and less about pomp and babysitting. My driving coach would tell me in 10 seconds what I've heard in 100 words from group coaching.

6 years ago I started into car racing (Lotus Cup) by just getting a car and putting in the miles on trackdays. I fell in love, spent a truckload of cash, developed a few bad habits and got pretty fast. Then I took some private coaching and I kept putting in the miles. Three years later I won the class championship. Same thing the next year. All the while learning a little something and assimilating more every time I drove. Bottom line for me, it's private coaching at proper intervals and putting in the seat time. Some of the best tips I got from Skip Barber's book though, so nothing against the establishment. And there's definitely a lot of reading required. And then there are the videos - those helped too - very visual. And it's not like group lessons can hurt if you have the time and patience to cater to the lowest denominator at times (not that that wouldn't be me of course.)

Thanks for the tips!
Which Skip Barber book...he seems to be a race car driver...?
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Old 01-29-2013, 03:18 PM   #33
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The book he is referring to is "Going Faster" by Carl Lopez who is a Skip Barber Racing school instructor. I know him personally since I was the lead engineer at Skip barber Racing School for a while.

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Old 01-29-2013, 04:21 PM   #34
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I'll put in an east coast plug for the Pine Barrens Adventure Camp. http://www.pinebarrensadventures.com/

I'm not affiliated but have taken 2 of their classes. I also think they were recently renamed.


They are the same guys who organize the Pine Barrens 300. They are extremely skilled and can cater to all levels of skill. Just be prepared for lots of sand. It really improved my big and small bike skills.
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Old 01-29-2013, 04:35 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by r'elise me View Post
So who's the killer coach in LA preferably without an insurance policy that's going to give me the real low down on a private multi day training ride(s) with camping, bike setup, navigation, control techniques. I'll put my money on his students any day...especially if I'm one of em .

Rawhide and the like = pamper group-ass for an entire weekend. Just shoot me in the head please. There's something just too 'midlife crisis" about a bunch of 50 year old noobs on BMW's trying to discover adventure that kinda reminds me of high school PE class - valuable knowledge imparted surely but equally sure there's a ton of bullshit related to lawyer and insurance company concerns. Hate that shit. I like the school that's more "shut up and ride" in style and less about pomp and babysitting. My driving coach would tell me in 10 seconds what I've heard in 100 words from group coaching.

6 years ago I started into car racing (Lotus Cup) by just getting a car and putting in the miles on trackdays. I fell in love, spent a truckload of cash, developed a few bad habits and got pretty fast. Then I took some private coaching and I kept putting in the miles. Three years later I won the class championship. Same thing the next year. All the while learning a little something and assimilating more every time I drove. Bottom line for me, it's private coaching at proper intervals and putting in the seat time. Some of the best tips I got from Skip Barber's book though, so nothing against the establishment. And there's definitely a lot of reading required. And then there are the videos - those helped too - very visual. And it's not like group lessons can hurt if you have the time and patience to cater to the lowest denominator at times (not that that wouldn't be me of course.)

Thanks for the tips!
Gotta be Jimmy Lewis then.
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Old 01-30-2013, 02:03 PM   #36
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HEY! What About Us!

You know that the Pacific Northwest [Oregon, Washington and Idaho/Montana/Northern Nevada] has some of the best off road riding in the US; period.....but to my knowledge [which is often limited...] we do not have any real off road riding schools...

Las Vegas and Newhall.Castaic is a damn far distance away; too far and besides one is too close to LV and the other too close to LA....let alone "back east" being an option.
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Old 04-11-2013, 04:59 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by r'elise me View Post
So who's the killer coach in LA preferably without an insurance policy that's going to give me the real low down on a private multi day training ride(s) with camping, bike setup, navigation, control techniques. I'll put my money on his students any day...especially if I'm one of em .

Rawhide and the like = pamper group-ass for an entire weekend. Just shoot me in the head please. There's something just too 'midlife crisis" about a bunch of 50 year old noobs on BMW's trying to discover adventure that kinda reminds me of high school PE class - valuable knowledge imparted surely but equally sure there's a ton of bullshit related to lawyer and insurance company concerns. Hate that shit. I like the school that's more "shut up and ride" in style and less about pomp and babysitting. My driving coach would tell me in 10 seconds what I've heard in 100 words from group coaching.

6 years ago I started into car racing (Lotus Cup) by just getting a car and putting in the miles on trackdays. I fell in love, spent a truckload of cash, developed a few bad habits and got pretty fast. Then I took some private coaching and I kept putting in the miles. Three years later I won the class championship. Same thing the next year. All the while learning a little something and assimilating more every time I drove. Bottom line for me, it's private coaching at proper intervals and putting in the seat time. Some of the best tips I got from Skip Barber's book though, so nothing against the establishment. And there's definitely a lot of reading required. And then there are the videos - those helped too - very visual. And it's not like group lessons can hurt if you have the time and patience to cater to the lowest denominator at times (not that that wouldn't be me of course.)

Thanks for the tips!
Obviously I'm a few years late here... But there are some awesome points of view on this thread and I wanted to chime in.

In my Adventure Instruction experience, group training sessions tend to have a smoother progression in many ways over 1 on 1. In individual trainings, I find the student will often ask a lot of lengthy questions, and retain only small amounts of the answer (requiring re-explanation down the line). On the other hand, riders in groups usually keep their questions concise, lest they hold up others from getting on their bikes. They hear questions from others that they might not have thought to ask, and seem to retain explanations more effecively.

There are, of course, exceptions. And there are most certainly people that benefit from one over the other. At the end of the day, though, it's mostly about attitude. If we can hang our ego’s at the door and try and better ourselves, everyone wins.
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Old 04-15-2013, 06:54 PM   #38
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Rawhyde

I went to a 4 day session 3 weeks ago. I raced dirt bikes when I was younger and still play around on my KTM 250. I wanted to learn how to ride a GS off road, in preparation for a trip to South America next fall.
I recommend the course highly. Great instructors,terrain, food, and camaraderie with neat people from all over North America. I learned a ton, as did all of the 40 people that attended the two classes - one was novice, the other intermediate. I took the two day intermediate, and then rode out to the Mojave desert. Sand no longer concerns me, even in a GS!!
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Old 03-13-2014, 04:18 PM   #39
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New ADV MSF Training 2014 https://www.facebook.com/xplorint


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Old 03-13-2014, 06:05 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DAKRIDER View Post
New ADV MSF Training 2014 https://www.facebook.com/xplorint


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That's odd. I'm a MSF RiderCoach in CA and I just checked RETSORG (the source for all MSF curricula) and find no mention of a MSF indorsed or approved "Introduction to Adventure Trail Riding" course.

There is an "Introduction to Trail Riding" course, but it is not geared specifically toward any particular size/type of bike.

Maybe you should touch base with Rob Gladden to get retsorg.org updated...
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Old 03-14-2014, 06:09 AM   #41
Telemarktumalo
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Off Road Training in the Northwest

Puget Sound Safety is offering several off road riding courses. A group of my friends and I are signed up for the two day training camp. Nice that they are bringing it to my back yard near Klamath Falls, OR. I'll report back near the end of June.

http://pssoffroad.com/pssor-home
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Old 07-02-2014, 03:45 PM   #42
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Offroad Riders training options

ConTeacher,
Your correct IATR is not endorsed by MSF nor do we claim we do, however it very similar to what we teach. We will be adding the MSF ITR, quads, and Private Military off-road Vehicles rider training next year.


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DAKRIDER screwed with this post 07-02-2014 at 03:46 PM Reason: edit
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Old 07-02-2014, 09:48 PM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Telemarktumalo View Post
Puget Sound Safety is offering several off road riding courses. A group of my friends and I are signed up for the two day training camp. Nice that they are bringing it to my back yard near Klamath Falls, OR. I'll report back near the end of June.

http://pssoffroad.com/pssor-home
End of June what year?
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Old 07-03-2014, 09:42 AM   #44
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try

try going out on a cheap dirt bike and race distric 37 for a year.theres nothin like the real thing.hard work but it will pay off for you when you venture out on the big bike.
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Old 07-08-2014, 06:51 PM   #45
B1
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if anyone is after basic tips i've been doing some video training clips for various dirt bike techniques, most of the basic ones can be adapted to adventure bikes. thread is on advrider here.
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