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Old 04-26-2014, 02:50 PM   #16
klinquist
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Very detailed write-up, thank you for taking the time. I have to wonder, however, how close a good shop could get to your results with a proper tune done by a good dyno shop with TuneECU? I believe it allows for the same granularity as a PC and obviously a much less complex install.
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Old 04-26-2014, 04:18 PM   #17
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Awesome write up. Would love to see done numbers.

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Old 04-27-2014, 07:51 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by klinquist View Post
Very detailed write-up, thank you for taking the time. I have to wonder, however, how close a good shop could get to your results with a proper tune done by a good dyno shop with TuneECU? I believe it allows for the same granularity as a PC and obviously a much less complex install.
Thank you for your kind words and good questions.

You raise several issues: TuneECU, good dyno shop, complexity and cost. I'll attempt to answer:

I am not familiar with the TuneECU, my impression is that it is a tool that allows you to change the fuel mixture settings in the OEM ECU. Assuming competence by the person who makes the change, this option may achieve the nearly same results.

"Good dyno shop": in my area, within 60 mile radius, I only know one shop that would meet this criteria and it only works on Ducatis, as far as I know.

Complexity: as I already had plastic and fuel tank off the bike and the top section opened up, the complexity of installing the PC V and the Autotune was not a major addition to the work.

The issue here, I think, is one of philosophy. I'm a do-it-yourself kind of guy, I have limited confidence in motorcycle shop service personnel and I enjoy working on my bikes and to, hopefully, improve upon them. One additional consideration is that my riding areas range from sea level to 14,000 ft elevation and the Autotune ought to adjust for this full range of elevation, better than the narrow-band OEM oxygen sensor.

Cost: I found the PC V and Autotune for $525, the only other costs were the machining of the new threads in the O2 bung and new exhaust port gaskets, trivial expenses. Dyno-time and ECU adjustment labor costs may be less but you place your confidence in somebody else.

Hopefully, I have answered your questions.
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Old 04-27-2014, 08:04 AM   #19
klinquist
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Originally Posted by Wandering Dane View Post
Thank you for your kind words and good questions.



You raise several issues: TuneECU, good dyno shop, complexity and cost. I'll attempt to answer:



I am not familiar with the TuneECU, my impression is that it is a tool that allows you to change the fuel mixture settings in the OEM ECU. Assuming competence by the person who makes the change, this option may achieve the nearly same results.



"Good dyno shop": in my area, within 60 mile radius, I only know one shop that would meet this criteria and it only works on Ducatis, as far as I know.



Complexity: as I already had plastic and fuel tank off the bike and the top section opened up, the complexity of installing the PC V and the Autotune was not a major addition to the work.



The issue here, I think, is one of philosophy. I'm a do-it-yourself kind of guy, I have limited confidence in motorcycle shop service personnel and I enjoy working on my bikes and to, hopefully, improve upon them. One additional consideration is that my riding areas range from sea level to 14,000 ft elevation and the Autotune ought to adjust for this full range of elevation, better than the narrow-band OEM oxygen sensor.



Cost: I found the PC V and Autotune for $525, the only other costs were the machining of the new threads in the O2 bung and new exhaust port gaskets, trivial expenses. Dyno-time and ECU adjustment labor costs may be less but you place your confidence in somebody else.



Hopefully, I have answered your questions.

You have, thank you. In my area there are lots of good shops and I am sure I could get similar results for cheaper with just TuneECU. Regardless, it's great to have options... The autotune is certainly a benefit that I wouldn't have, I ride from 0-10k ft here in CA :).
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Old 06-17-2014, 10:22 AM   #20
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I'm curious what it would be like to use in the dirt.... I know I'd love it on the road, but probably too much to handle OR.

Nice write up.
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Old 06-20-2014, 06:59 AM   #21
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I'm curious what it would be like to use in the dirt.... I know I'd love it on the road, but probably too much to handle OR.

Nice write up.
Thanks for your kind words.

If I understand your first statement / question, it relates to how the additional low-end torque would affect riding on surfaces with marginal traction?

While I agree that too much available torque could present a challenge on low-friction surfaces, I don't think that this is really the issue. Tire selection will be more critical.

As we know, traction between a tire and the road benefits from long intervals between combustion cycles, which is why a single cylinder four-stroke bike at low RPMs generally will hook up better than a 4-cylinder at high RPMs on dirt or why 4-cylinder Jeeps do better on difficult off-road than V8s, etc.

So a triple is not the ideal off-road mount. However, in marginal traction situations, the lower the RPMs the better the rear tire should hook up because of the wider spacing between combustion events. Therefore, assuming that the bike has a decent rear tire, I would think ability to smoothly apply power at lower RPMs would be more of an advantage than the disadvantage of having too much torque.

Makes sense?
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Old 06-20-2014, 09:56 AM   #22
CRFan1
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Very nice write up indeed! I am a fan of PC's but I have to say...I have the Leo on my 2013 Roadie and had the dealer install the Arrow map. Mainly for warranty reasons I guess. That being said I love it. Drivability wise it does everything you mentioned above with ease. I get about 44 average MPH but sometimes higher, sometimes lower based on speed, wind, etc etc. It seems I get a minimum of 150 miles before the light comes on with anywhere from 30-50 miles in reserve based on what the bike's computer says in the "Miles to Empty" screen. Roughly 190-200 miles per tank. Honestly I am really ok with that and it's no muss, no fuss.

I hope you get the PC dialed in!
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Old 06-20-2014, 03:54 PM   #23
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Very nice write up indeed! I am a fan of PC's but I have to say...I have the Leo on my 2013 Roadie and had the dealer install the Arrow map. Mainly for warranty reasons I guess. That being said I love it. Drivability wise it does everything you mentioned above with ease. I get about 44 average MPH but sometimes higher, sometimes lower based on speed, wind, etc etc. It seems I get a minimum of 150 miles before the light comes on with anywhere from 30-50 miles in reserve based on what the bike's computer says in the "Miles to Empty" screen. Roughly 190-200 miles per tank. Honestly I am really ok with that and it's no muss, no fuss.

I hope you get the PC dialed in!
Thanks! You certainly went a much easier route than I did with nearly the same result. My mileage is low-to-mid 50s but our riding styles and environments may be different.

A few weeks ago, I had the opportunity to ride a 675 Street Triple with Two Brothers pots and the Triumph aftermarket map. It ran great, low speed torque and pick-up were impressive.

BTW, no dialing in required for my set-up, the wide-band oxygen sensor ensures perfect fueling from the very first mile.
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Old 06-22-2014, 06:00 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by Wandering Dane View Post
Thanks! You certainly went a much easier route than I did with nearly the same result. My mileage is low-to-mid 50s but our riding styles and environments may be different.

A few weeks ago, I had the opportunity to ride a 675 Street Triple with Two Brothers pots and the Triumph aftermarket map. It ran great, low speed torque and pick-up were impressive.

BTW, no dialing in required for my set-up, the wide-band oxygen sensor ensures perfect fueling from the very first mile.
Cool deal! And for the record, I THINK most of the PC guys say with auto-tune to make sure and get a good BASE map on the bike and than let it do its thing. keep us posted on your results!
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Old 11-21-2014, 08:29 PM   #25
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Any updates since last time? Been 5 months and looking to see how its going.
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Old 11-23-2014, 05:20 PM   #26
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All good

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Any updates since last time? Been 5 months and looking to see how its going.
About 10K miles have passed since my last report on the PC V and AutoTune. No problems or issues at all. I've ridden to sea level and 12,000+ ft elevation and experienced perfect fueling everywhere.

So in conclusion, I remain very pleased with the upgrade.
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Old 04-17-2015, 03:02 PM   #27
robdogg
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old post.. but I was looking for information on the Booster plug, as these are now available for the Tiger 800.. so hoping to find out if they are effective or not.. my 2012 Tiger runs very well, but it does have a little bit of stuttering as I call it, when rolling off the throttle and quickly rolling back on again.. which is common in slow speed, rough terrain kind of riding..

not bad at all, really but looking for an easy cure if one exits, and one that won't cost me hundreds of $ and hours on the dyno
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Old 04-18-2015, 09:26 PM   #28
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I am quite surprised that DynoJet has not come out with the O2 sensor that is made to fit the 12MM bungs. New Harleys also have the smaller O2 sensors. Perhaps its just a matter of time.

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