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Old 01-31-2014, 02:23 PM   #16
jeiff
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Motornoggin View Post
I would think the blocks would disintegrate after a while. Go to garage sales and buy old bar bells and cast iron weights. You can usually get them cheap and they would last hundreds of years submerged.
Normally, standard concrete block will withstand immersion just fine. The trouble would start only if the block is saturated, then frozen.
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Old 01-31-2014, 06:52 PM   #17
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http://www.awebgeo.com/slim_jim_geo_...late_home.html

Slim Jim geo exchange...
I have used their product with good results.
Stand up guy to work with as well.
Do it right for the last time.
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Old 02-01-2014, 04:35 AM   #18
Stan_R80/7
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Originally Posted by kantuckid View Post
I never have dived down there to see if they fell apart or the ties that held them broke apart... a mystery for the ages huh?

I would expect that if the blocks disintegrated (which is unlikely unless allowed to freeze) then the ties are on the pipes. A jon boat trip to the assembly in the early spring would answer that question. Personally, I would be curious enough to try and fish out a few of the anchors to see what went wrong.

If nylon ties were used, then the mystery is solved. Good luck!
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Old 02-01-2014, 03:00 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by jeiff View Post
Normally, standard concrete block will withstand immersion just fine. The trouble would start only if the block is saturated, then frozen.
FWIW, I built a cistern out of block in 1980 & stuccoed the inside. It had spring water flowing in at one end continuosly 24/7 for all the years until i got "city water"(UGH) in ~2008. The blocks were still solid when I collapsed it with a backhoe. Except the water level blocks that had eroded from slight wave action, I suppose? I do wish I'd have had the $$$ to have poured it as the blocks at that level were hard to keep sealed as time they wore out & leaked at joints too. The lower blocks were all solid. There could have been some freezing above ground but not likely where water stayed against them as spring water is ground temperature.

I'll take a bigger look at the "slimjim" thingy,thanks.
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Old 02-01-2014, 03:21 PM   #20
BossMaverick
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What about getting some 3" or 4" diameter sections of PVC pipe, filling them with concrete, and then tying the PVC sections inline with the geo-thermo pipes with stainless or copper wire (or romex)? It would be more durable and snag-less than cinder blocks, yet it would still be a cost effective solution. I suppose you could also pour sand in the PVC pipe sections and cap them, and not have to worry about messing with concrete.

I personal hate cinder blocks under water, but that is just me.
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Old 02-01-2014, 05:14 PM   #21
GreaseMonkey
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I am trying to figure out how the ties all got broken, about the only thing I can think of is if a cow got caught in a loop or something.

Anyway, I suspect all of the suggestions given here are good ones. Personally I think 5/16 nylon cord tied to the blocks would be how I'd do it but really anything would work.

Personally, I'd keep using cinder blocks but if you want gen-u-ine gov't sandbags let me know how big a box you'll pay the shipping on and I'll send them to you.
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Old 02-03-2014, 01:09 PM   #22
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Lots of food for thought!
I like the sand idea better than blocks-containment & keeping whatever weight on top is the thing but like most my age I have several piles of blocks from this and that over the years. White pvc pipes are not UV resistant-so I guess the left over 3-4" drain pipes I have are not gonna stay real long.
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Old 02-27-2014, 11:43 AM   #23
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I'm back from a trip-
I'll give this a bump to prospect for more/new ideas as still way to cold to play with those pipes
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Old 02-27-2014, 11:56 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by kantuckid View Post
I'm back from a trip-
I'll give this a bump to prospect for more/new ideas as still way to cold to play with those pipes
you are over thinking this .. just go with the largest diameter all copper ground wire you can find 4 or 6 gauge. strap to what ever heavy object that will not come apart. they make thick copper straps too, but that needs to be bolted together adding a weak point vs copper ground wire can be twisted tight.

only part I'd worry about is pipe breaking while tying weight to one point with rest of pipe still floating.
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Old 02-27-2014, 04:03 PM   #25
Creation
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PVC filled with rocks and sand that can fit inside the piping spiral, close off the pipe when filled and attach with copper wire . Problem solved for life.
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Old 02-27-2014, 09:51 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kantuckid View Post
Lots of food for thought!
I like the sand idea better than blocks-containment & keeping whatever weight on top is the thing but like most my age I have several piles of blocks from this and that over the years. White pvc pipes are not UV resistant-so I guess the left over 3-4" drain pipes I have are not gonna stay real long.
Water absorbs UV pretty effectively. If that white pipe goes 3+ feet down, UV's not going to be your problem.

You could also paint it before you sink it.
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Old 02-27-2014, 10:24 PM   #27
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Use large zip-ties. 36" Panduit or Catamount A/C flex-duct zip-ties would be best.

One tip: Secure the loop to the bottom of the cement blocks so the loop maintains contact with the bottom of the pond. This will provide slightly warmer entering water temperatures for winter heating and prevent fishing tackle and oars from snagging the loop.
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