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Old 10-06-2012, 05:54 PM   #7321
SamM
Jeep Overlander
 
Joined: Nov 2004
Location: West Virginia
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PhoenixGirl63,
If you want a great deal, you may want to checkout the Bikes Section of the Classifieds. My KLX250SF is listed there for sale. It's a great bike for the money I am asking. It would be a great deal for you on a near new bike. It has just over 1000 miles on it. Sorry, not really trying to pimp my stuff but...

I'll give it a bump, so you can find it easier.

SamM
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Old 10-06-2012, 09:57 PM   #7322
TNC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rickypanecatyl View Post
So is the US the only only place with carbuerated KLX's left? (I was going to say the only place that doesn't get FI but thought that might hurt some feelings! )

For those that wanted FI I wonder how easy it would be to put on...

Once we start hearing reports of the FI guys having nailed the mapping with the 351 kit it might look good to me!
You ain't hurtin' my feelings...I just installed a Mikuni TM36 pumper carb on my '06 KLX, and I love it.
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Old 10-07-2012, 07:49 AM   #7323
lobolator
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Carb of FI?

Not sure I'd even know how to fix the only problem I've had so far on this bike...clogged jets...if it were FI. The carb is easy, drain it and go(if lucky), or drain it and pull the bottom off to clean and replace. 30minutes on the side of the trail.
Can that be done with FI? I don't know, you must be able to trail fix it, if you have the knowledge, I do not. Maybe it's easier. But doesn't FI need a fuel pump? Another source of problems?
I like my troublesome carb. It just works and when it doesn't, I can usually fix it, or limp home to where I can.

And to Phoenix and other short ridres considering the KLX:
I'm 5'8" with a 31" inseam and was very uncomfortable on the tall KLX, at first, with just my toes on the ground. I also come from a world of road bikes, where dropping a bike is a big No-No(think Ferrari red Ducati - very expensive paint on top of expensive fiberglass = no dropping). The KLX almost begs you to drop it(once you have barkbusters and a skid plate on there), it's a dirt bike after all. And being able to put your feet down only matters when you run out of momentum, the rest of the time off-road you should be standing on the pegs and squeezing the bike between your legs...and that is exactly when 11" of travel is your best friend.
I eventually got used to the height on the road(and the bike suspension does settle in after some miles), at stop lights I just shift to one side and flat foot while waiting, and off-road I drop it every so often because I can't get my foot down, oh well. I usually try and stop in a low spot or next to a rock if the ground is uneven.
Seat Concepts seems like a good fix for the seat height problem, as well as adding comfort for road miles.
Elsewhere know as MaximusPrime

lobolator screwed with this post 10-07-2012 at 07:51 AM Reason: because I can
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Old 10-07-2012, 11:33 AM   #7324
Rob.G
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Seat Height

Lobolator has a very valid point with regards to seat height. On a dirt-oriented bike, you should be standing when doing most off-road riding. The only time you're gonna wish for a lower seat height is when you come to a stop on rocky or rutted terrain. I have the same issue. It's frustrating, but it doesn't happen that often, and with time and patience and practice, I think it makes you a better rider than the folks with longer legs who can "cheat" and paddle through the tough stuff. We have to actually RIDE it.

Once off-road, you do most of your steering with the footpegs anyway.. shifting your weight from peg to peg to tilt the bike. At least at higher speeds you do. At low speeds, it's a combination of both. It's something you learn; it seems really intimidating when you're first learning, but it comes with practice.

So... get it as low as you can, practically, even if it means only one foot down when stopped. You WILL drop it from time to time. As long as you have good handguards, it's not a big deal (to protect the levers). Mine's been dropped more times than I can count and still looks pretty good all things considered. :)

Rob
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Old 10-07-2012, 01:55 PM   #7325
djchan
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Any sub commanders out there? Warning - long, whiny story follows

Took my 250 out this AM to the worst terrain I ever ride. I know I shouldn't do it alone but nobody else wants to ride this crap - even ATVs. Towards the end of the ride (still in the middle of nowhere, ME but at least I'm off that damn mountain) I come to a an extremely long mud hole - maybe 30-40 yards long. To the right was an alternate route that had been cut by 4-wheelers. It was shorter, but looked deeper than the original trail, so I took the old trail. Didn't take long to find out how deep it was - up to mid thigh with deep muck on the bottom. Went down within 25 feet of my entry point.

What I later found out was the bottom of this particular hole was a severe W shape in cross section. Extremely deep troughs on each side with a higher center in the middle. At the center - it was only 1 foot deep. At the sides - 2.5 to 3 feet deep. Ugly, muck filled stench. At times I was in the water chest deep.

Of course I figured out the cross section as I was struggling to drag my 250S (the S is clearly for submarine) to the side of the hole because there was absolutely no way it was moving forward or back to my entry point. The left side of the hole was a horrible tangle of blown-down trash wood, but to the right was a fairly open slot between the 2 mudholes. Unfortunately when I hoisted the bike from the bottom of the hole it slid down into the left V of the W shaped bottom. So, I had to drag the bike sideways to the hump, into the right V of the W and up out of the V and onto fairly dry ground. All I can say is - damn I'm Herculean. Good to do that crap every now and again to assure yourself you're not a decrepit old man afterall.

Then a 1.5 mile push uphill/coast downhill to a landmark that I recognized. Left the bike there without trying to start it up. NO WAY, NO HOW was I about to bend my valves trying to start that ugly stenchful SOB.

From there it was another 1.5 miles out to the nearest road where I caught a lift from a pickup going my way back into Farmington. In downtown (and I use that term loosely) Farmington I called a friend who gave me a lift out to my house. Long story short - just like a Harley, she got a ride in the back of the pickup.

Should have taken the time to clean the muck off but all I could think about was getting that crap out of my crankcase. Put it in the barn and pulled the oil plug.... I was shocked by how much water came out. There was at least as much water as oil in there. And, the water came out 1st. Followed by the chocolate milk oil. In fact, there was so much water I was worried she had blown the head gasket or cracked the head, but a quick check of the radiator showed a full compliment of beautiful green coolant.

so, she's in the barn, the last few slugs of muddy oil draining out. I've also drained the carb. I plan on heading into town to pick up a couple quarts of cheap sacrifical oil (don't want to waste my good synthetic stuff) to run and drop again. I also plan to pull the plug and let it turn over a few cranks with no compression before trying to start her up. I'll also check the airbox and re-oil the filter.

Is there anything else I should do before cranking her up?

I figure if it all goes OK, no harm done. If worse comes to worse - 351 here I come.

All in all, I learned 3 things today: Don't be a dumbass and ride that kinda stuff alone. People are generally nice and willing to help a dumbass out of a jam, even when he smells like muckhole stench. And, that plucky little KLX will run for a couple seconds even when fully submerged.

Sorry for the whiny rant.
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used to have - 1982 Maxim 650, 2000 Concours, 2001 KLX300, 2001 DRZ400E, 2004 KLR650, 2006 TE610, 1998 KDX220, 2001 Bandit 1200S, 2007 KLX-250, 2004 KLX-300R and a 2002 KTM 400EXC.

Now own - 2007 Suzuki Bandit 1250, 2002 KTM LC4E, and a 2007 CRF250X.
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Old 10-07-2012, 02:21 PM   #7326
The Letter J
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as long as you weren't full throttle when it stalled, I wouldn't even worry about it. I know the situation all too well myself and in my experiences, I've always let go of the throttle before going for a swim... the motor at idle as it takes a drink. A quick trailside pull of the sparkplug and partial drain of the oil (as you noted, the water settles to the bottom) and I'd be back in business. The crankcase vent would give off steam for a few minutes burning off residual water (minimal.) The few times that I've had to deal with a sunken bike, we were all on regular dirtbikes and had trucked them to the trailhead so the ride back to the truck was never too far. Once at home it only took 1 oil change to be nice and clean again. Being that you never started it after the submersion (with water/gunk in your oil/etc.) you should have avoided all of the potential after effects that I may have subjected my old scoots to.
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Old 10-07-2012, 10:41 PM   #7327
Jon_PDX
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PhoenixGirl63,

A few years ago I had a Kawasaki Sherpa 250. It a slightly shorter KLX250 and air cooled. It does not have the suspension of the KLX but it was still a fun bike and even handled rough single track stuff better than I thought it would. The only issue I had with it was one time when I was climbing a long dirt hill at high speed it did get pretty hot and started to lose power.

I'm not sure if that would be of interest to you but I did not see it mentioned so I thought I would suggest it as something to look at if you had not already considered it.

Jon...
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Old 10-08-2012, 08:34 AM   #7328
StandingRoomOnly
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djchan View Post


Is there anything else I should do before cranking her up?

I figure if it all goes OK, no harm done. If worse comes to worse - 351 here I come.


Sorry for the whiny rant.
Be sure and change the headlight fluid It makes a real difference at night.

Hopefully it is an 2007 or older KLX. Those electric instrument panels don't handle water well. With no check valve between the air box and the crankcase breather, the crankcase fills up with water real quick. Particularity for those people that drill out the restriction at the air box connection
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Old 10-08-2012, 08:39 AM   #7329
IDRIDR
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djchan:

Good story. Hope in the end all is fine.

Here's a tutorial

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1EtHUzfdYqE
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Old 10-08-2012, 08:53 AM   #7330
rube
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Model year changes

Hi,

Can someone point me to a table or list of model year changes for the US KLX250s.

I am starting to shop for a used one and do not understand what changes were made over the years.

What I understand is that there are basically two versions in the US; pre- and post- 2009. Was there no 2008 US model?
Are the basic differences the mechanical vs electronic dash? Also I've heard there was a change in the footpeg mounts such that if you want to fit the kicker on a 2009 or later you have to use a right hand footpeg mount from a 2006.
Anything else.

Thanks,

rube
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Old 10-08-2012, 09:04 AM   #7331
Lutz
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Correct, there was no '08 US-model, and it really is a comparison of '06-'07 and '09+.

I don't know of a table of changes, but off the top of my head:
'09+ has less suspension travel (and there's the SF supermoto model too, with more suspension differences)
'09+ has somewhat different muffler/catalytic converter
'09+ has entirely different bodywork
'09+ has different swingarm and drive chain adjustment
'09+ has thicker spokes
'09+ has lower seat height
'09+ has different gauges
'09+ has a lower 6th gear ratio (numerically higher = higher revs at a given speed)
'09+ have bigger brake rotors front and rear
'09+ have a shorter right foopeg mount - won't clear a kickstart lever, but can be changed to the older style

For what it's worth, the '06-'07 have more in common with the KLX300R than the '09+.

Lutz screwed with this post 10-08-2012 at 12:37 PM
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Old 10-08-2012, 09:08 AM   #7332
Rob.G
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I think the more hard-core types prefer the 06-07 mainly due to the suspension travel differences, but I think that's the most important difference. And if you're going to mod your suspension at all (which you should), that point is largely moot. I think it comes down to, what can you get the best deal on?

Me, I prefer the look of the 09+ bikes and the nicer instrument cluster. The only thing I don't like about it is how one footpeg mount is welded to the frame, so if you bend it, it'll be some work to fix. I dunno if the same is true for the 06-07.

Rob
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Old 10-08-2012, 11:45 AM   #7333
djchan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StandingRoomOnly View Post
Be sure and change the headlight fluid It makes a real difference at night.

Hopefully it is an 2007 or older KLX. Those electric instrument panels don't handle water well. With no check valve between the air box and the crankcase breather, the crankcase fills up with water real quick. Particularity for those people that drill out the restriction at the air box connection
Guilty as charged on both counts. It is a 2007 and yes, I drilled the restriction out.

The instrument panel works just fine.

Thanks for the link IDRDR.

Gonna pull the carb and do more than just drain it this PM.

Also draining the fuel and starting over with fresh.
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used to have - 1982 Maxim 650, 2000 Concours, 2001 KLX300, 2001 DRZ400E, 2004 KLR650, 2006 TE610, 1998 KDX220, 2001 Bandit 1200S, 2007 KLX-250, 2004 KLX-300R and a 2002 KTM 400EXC.

Now own - 2007 Suzuki Bandit 1250, 2002 KTM LC4E, and a 2007 CRF250X.
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Old 10-09-2012, 06:28 AM   #7334
mikesova
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I hope I did the right thing. This year I've done a lot of modifcations on my KLX, but I never changed out the front tire. Could that have been my downfall in the sand? I replaced my rear tire with a D606, but my front tire seemed to be in good shape so I kept it, the stock D605. I am always losing control in the sand and after talking to some friends, I decided to order the Pirelli Scorpion All Terrain front tire. Do you think this will be a drastic improvement in sandy conditions (Michigan)?

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Old 10-09-2012, 06:42 AM   #7335
cjbiker
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I'm not familiar with the Pirelli all terrain, but that pic looks like the Pirelli Scorpion XCMH. I'm running those on my KLX, and I don't think you'll find a better DOT knobby. You will be amazed at how much better it is in sand, mud, etc than the stock front tire.
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