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Old 01-10-2006, 12:58 PM   #16
xtphreak
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZZR_Ron
Screw that flasher stuff. Do you want the schematic for one of my vest controllers? Simple and effective. You have to order a special transistor though, they have a low "on" resistance, which means you don't have to use a heat sink.

YES
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Old 01-10-2006, 01:08 PM   #17
Gringo
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I've done four garments like this - I used 28Ga. wire, and for my next I would probably use 30Ga. to reduce the amt. of wire needed to to get the same resistance; weaving the wire into the jacket with a needle is tedious work. These things work well, if you use the right kind of jacket as a base. First I did an old shelled fleece jacket and that was not too satisfactory since the fleece was between me and the heater wires; next I got a poofy quallofil down-like jacket that worked better but it was hard to keep the wires close to the inner liner fabric in such a loosely-quilted jacket, and also that sort of jacket compresses too easily whereever your outer jacket is snug, so you still get cold spots. My most successful one so far was the diamond-quilted liner that came with my wife's IXS 'Sheila' jacket - I measured enough wire for resistance that would give 45W of heat but she has still complained it's too hot (but being from a tropical country, she doesn't ride below freezing), so I'm gonna have to get some kind of heat controller to step it down. She actually got a burn on her arm from where I left a tiny bit of wire exposed where it poked out as I crossed over one of the quilt stitches - she was using it on the interstate in summertime wearing only a T-shirt underneath, she said one spot felt real hot and when we stopped she had a little blister on her arm. So be meticulous about burying your wires well, or wear full coverage clothing underneath.

After I had good heat up top, I even tried to add heat to the legs of my old 1pc Aerostitch. I took all the wire I had left over and ran it up and down beneath the inner liner around the thighs. It worked but not great - too patchy - you do need a little insulation behind your wires to get the most out of your heaters.

Next project is to wire up the liner of my Motoport jacket, just in case I ever need it. So far though, it's been warm enough without any help from Georg Ohm...
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Old 01-10-2006, 01:19 PM   #18
xtphreak
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my version of the e-vest

ok this cost like twice what the roll of wire etc etc costs

seems it was $50

I had a fleece ski vest $0
heating panels from Kreamer Sports $50 (I think)
SAE plug (2 for $1.99 @ NAPA)
roller lamp switch ($1 Lowes)
12v LED ( $2 @ Radio Shack)


the panels are like a silicon rubber panel inside a nylon pouch, they said you can sew right thru it with no prob

the surface temp is like 104 deg F (I think they said)

they come in a pre-wired set of 3 (I have one each side of my chest & the center one over my kidneys)

I'll tell ya this ... they get really warm for 24 watts of power

I got two more panels for my biceps, just never have added them in

the glove liners are abso-fukin-lutely great

15 watts ... uninsulated gloves

no handguards

no cold fingers



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Women and cats will do as they please,
and men and dogs should relax and get used to the idea.
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Chrome don't get ya home. Rob Nye
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xtphreak screwed with this post 12-17-2009 at 06:39 AM
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Old 01-10-2006, 02:53 PM   #19
ZZR_Ron
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I built my heated vest from a 10 dollar heated car seat at WalMart...
but I don't know if they sell them in the USA.

About 50 watts. Lots of heat!
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Old 01-28-2006, 12:35 AM   #20
HellSickle OP
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Toasty warm

OK, here's a brief description of my trials & tribulations in building an electric jacket that wouldn't (immediately) immolate me.
http://www.crystalinks.com/shc.html

Step 1: Pick up a cheap pile jacket & a cheap nylon jacket with mesh liner. Pile jacket: $10 at Target. Cheap 2nd hand golf jacket: $8.

Here are a couple pics of the nylon jacket. Finding something with a thin shell & a mesh liner is critical. The shell will become the part laying against the rider, and the mesh will hold the woven wire:



Mesh Liner:


Step 2: Obtain some stranded 30ga wire with teflon insulation. Newark doesn't carry it any more, but I found some at www.mouser.com
For white wire, the p/n is 566-83000-100-09

Cost for wire: ~$24 with shipping. I used less than half of the 100' spool.

Step 3: Decide how much heat you want and cut the appropriate length of wire. Wire resistances can be found at http://www.powerstream.com/Wire_Size.htm

Power = Voltage^2/R. Important: remember that your operating voltage isn't 12V, but ~13.5V for a system that is charging. This is very important since the power is proportional to the voltage.

I selected a length of ~40feet to give me a power around 40-45W.

Step 4: Turn the windbreaker inside out & weave the wire thru the mesh using a large needle. I wove some thru the collar area, the upper arms, back and front of the jacket. I ran a higher weave density in the collar and front of the jacket than I did in the back. Here are a couple shots of the wire in the mesh liner:



Step 5: Place the liner into the pile jacket & stitch into place. Put in suitable power connectors (& a 5A fuse). I sewed them together along the lapels, and the ends of the sleeves. I left the bottom unstitched until I was done fiddling with my wire distribution. I ended up reweaving a couple of sections due to hot spots. When I was finished I basted the bottom together in 5 spots.

Here are some of the finished pic's:


I experimented with the power connector & switch. I wanted a lighted rocker, so I kludged one into the wiring. For the power connector I chose a co-axial type for an easy disconnect, should I forget to unhook myself after dismounting.



That's about it. After a couple rearrangements of the wiring, I'm very happy with the warmth. The heated collar is great. Heating the upper arms is very nice. There's still plenty of power left over for the torso.

Here's hoping that I don't become a human transformer the first time I ride under some high-tension power lines.

-Jeff-
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Old 01-28-2006, 08:56 AM   #21
Mimosa
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Total cost including labor?

You said you were an engineer. Props for the DIY project, but if you factor in how much labor/time costs, it would have been easier to buy off the shelf.

Jacket liners cost from $150-200

-mim
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Old 01-28-2006, 09:23 AM   #22
Pilbara
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Mim

Quote:
but if you factor in how much labor/time costs, it would have been easier to buy off the shelf.
Im with Jeff! There is a certain satisfaction that a lot of more 'sensible' monetary wise individuals just won't couldn't and will never either appreciate of understand - the satisfaction of having made or built it yourself.

Absolutely nothing wrong with that and I wish I was sometimes able to excercise the sensible approach more, but hey like I say Im with Jeff, you made it buddy, let someone else buy one!

Great post and thanks for sharing!!!!
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Old 01-28-2006, 09:42 AM   #23
ebbo
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I had a go at this a couple of years back, it worked well. I used 28awg wire as I couldn’t get anything as fine as 30awg at the time. I followed the iron on stichwitchery route but when the wires got warm it softened the bond and the wires dropped off the liner I would use the needle and thread route next time

These were the sources for my build.

http://www.ibmwr.org/otech/heatedclothing.html

http://webpages.charter.net/hondapotamus/heat.htm

http://www.ridemyown.com/articles/ot...clothing.shtml
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Old 01-28-2006, 09:49 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HellSickle

Hey, maybe it will be easier to trip traffic signals?

-Jeff-
Let us know on THAT one, Jeff!!!
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Old 01-28-2006, 12:26 PM   #25
HellSickle OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mimosa
You said you were an engineer. Props for the DIY project, but if you factor in how much labor/time costs, it would have been easier to buy off the shelf.

Jacket liners cost from $150-200

-mim
Total material cost was ~$45. My engineering consulting rate is $125/hour. I spent perhaps 3 hours on the jacket. Thanks for the tip! I'm headed for Ebay to sell this baby. Reserve will be set at $400!

I like doing these projects. Invariably, I will learn something that I can apply somewhere else. Perhaps more heated garmets. Perhaps an invention for another product. You never know where the knowledge will come in handy.

Besides, now I have something that is Exactly what I want. No compromises.

Widder electric vests go for $100+. They don't have heated arms. The electric jackets I've seen go for $200+. If either of these items were to break, I would probably be SOL. Since I built mine, I can repair it.

Perhaps you should reread ZAMM by Pirsig. It's not about the item itself. It's about having an inate understanding of the substance of these things.

-Jeff-
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Old 01-28-2006, 12:33 PM   #26
ZZR_Ron
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HellSickle
Total material cost was ~$45. My engineering consulting rate is $125/hour. I spent perhaps 3 hours on the jacket. Thanks for the tip! I'm headed for Ebay to sell this baby. Reserve will be set at $400!

I like doing these projects. Invariably, I will learn something that I can apply somewhere else. Perhaps more heated garmets. Perhaps an invention for another product. You never know where the knowledge will come in handy.

Besides, now I have something that is Exactly what I want. No compromises.

Widder electric vests go for $100+. They don't have heated arms. The electric jackets I've seen go for $200+. If either of these items were to break, I would probably be SOL. Since I built mine, I can repair it.

Perhaps you should reread ZAMM by Pirsig. It's not about the item itself. It's about having an inate understanding of the substance of these things.

-Jeff-
Personal satisfaction of knowing you built it: Priceless!!!
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Old 01-28-2006, 01:37 PM   #27
walrond
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Thanks for the write-up! This has been a plan of mine for several months now. As soon as I get back to Germany, this project is one of the first on my list!
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Old 01-28-2006, 03:14 PM   #28
Vesa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HellSickle
OK, here's a brief description of my trials & tribulations in building an electric jacket that wouldn't (immediately) immolate me.
-Jeff-
Cheers! Guess who just ordered a 30m roll of 30AWG wire for a whopping 12,30€

Vesa
http://www.moposivut.com
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Old 01-28-2006, 05:20 PM   #29
KL5A
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Here's mine-

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=54013


It's worked fine for me.

I just got back from a shopping trip. I couldn't find the heated car seat pad at wally world, but I did find the 555 timer and the MOSFET I needed at Radio Shack so I guess I'm building a controller this weekend!

Northern Hydraulics had a 12v electric blanket in their catalog-another possibility!

Now a word for the naysayers out there....

We are sorry that you don't have the ability or the understanding to undertake such a task. Kindly refrain from telling us that we are going to die as an inevitable result of our experimentation . Thanks for your cooperation.
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Old 01-28-2006, 10:56 PM   #30
dwillie57
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At some of the larger truck stops, you can find the 12v electric blankets the truckers use to keep warm in their cabs while sleeping. I've seen full size blankets selling for less than $20.00 They already have power conectors and the wiring istalled. Tear off the fabric and attach the wires to the vest of your choice and you're all set. d.
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