ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Beasts
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 05-21-2007, 05:29 AM   #76
John in Leeds
Gnarly Adventurer
 
John in Leeds's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Oddometer: 377
Thumb

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim
Hi John, glad it's still all going well.

The side-on pic of you sitting on the bike makes it look really small, like a 250 or something like that. Are you a big guy or is it a small bike?

Edit - Answered my own question, I see in your first post that you're 6'1", 200 pounds. So, as you're bigish but not a monster, I'd say that the bike looks on the small side, I note also in that pic that your left foot is flat on the floor.
It's funny that Tim, I thought just the same on seeing the pic first time. I think when I put the off road wheels on that will raise the seat height a bit. The bike does not feel small but it does feel light, it is probably little too much static sag but is ok for me on the road.

Nice to get your input
John in Leeds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2007, 12:36 PM   #77
John in Leeds
Gnarly Adventurer
 
John in Leeds's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Oddometer: 377
Thumb

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim
I note also in that pic that your left foot is flat on the floor.
Riding out today I had a good look at the seat and the reason I can get both feet flat on the ground is that the seat is quite narrow and well shaped at the front giving a longer reach for the seat height.

Unlike the greater height with off road wheels and tyres that give a seat height of 37.5 inches

Highland are sending a replacement headlamp as original has cracked from side to side. Should get some idea of time for a replacement part.

That reminds me, I did not get breakdown insurance for the French trip. Highland gave me their number in Sweden, giving the promise that they would organise everything if a breakdown occured. So all I had to do was take a puncture repair cylinder and a few tools (and of course my phone). Great stuff.

John in Leeds screwed with this post 12-19-2008 at 05:04 AM
John in Leeds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2007, 12:54 PM   #78
John in Leeds
Gnarly Adventurer
 
John in Leeds's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Oddometer: 377
Quote:
Originally Posted by dhaynes
That piston is cool... looks like some serious engineering going into them. Must rev like a sewing machine!

The motor at present does not seem to produce significant extra power at higher revs. Max power in it's present guise is around 6000 with peak torque at 4000. I rarely need to take it over 7 as there is enough below and taking it over does not seem to be any major advantage.

The importer Tim says they respond well to a better breathing air filter and removing the cat from the exhaust releasing the top end. He seems to know what he's on about as he races his in SM1 class with little other modification. I think both Tim and Pokenhood from Nottingham have got them 'to rev like a sewiing machine', but don't think I will bother with mine until I feel the need.
John in Leeds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2007, 10:43 PM   #79
marcjs
Chi-Town Outback
 
marcjs's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2007
Location: Chicago North Shore
Oddometer: 14
Hi John,

I have been reading your posts with great interest - thanks for taking the time to document your experiences with your Highland.

I own three Highlands in the USA, which I acquired from the defunct USA distributor (see pic below of my stable). All are 2004 950 V-twins: one Outback; one Allroad; and one Motard. The Outback is my daily transport to work (when dry). The other two have only turned tens of kilometers as I have been tuning their EFI using the Highland tuning kit.

After taking delivery of the bikes in 'kit form' I secured titles and Illinois registration for them and have been experimenting with improving the low-end control. Tim, the UK distributor has been an invaluable source of assistance with the tuning process, and is an exceptionally nice guy as well.

I am pretty happy with the present tuning (largely as passed on to me by UK Tim), and may be placing the Allroad up for sale later this month (if anyone Stateside is interested please feel free to PM me).

I will be in the UK the third week of June (funny enough, in your neck of the woods - Huddersfield), and would like very much if you'd share some more of your experiences over a pint or two at a watering-hole of your choice (l feel I'm entitled to indulge in the British vernacular, having returned to the States a couple of years ago following a 10-year stay in 'Blighty'). Let me know if you'll be around the last week of June .
Attached Images
 
__________________
"Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe."

- Albert Einstein
marcjs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2007, 05:07 AM   #80
SQD8R
Eat squids and be merry
 
SQD8R's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2004
Location: The Village: 75°53'34"W, 45°17'42"N
Oddometer: 7,356
Quote:
Originally Posted by John in Leeds
That reminds me, I did not get breakdown insurance for the French trip. Highland gave me their number in Sweden, giving the promise that they would organise everything if a breakdown occured. So all I had to do was take a puncture repair cylinder and a few tools (and of course my phone). Great stuff.
Who says small companies do not step up.
__________________
2006 BMW HP2E: Teutonic Dreadnought
2011 Husqvarna TE630: Swedish heritage, German engineering, Italian flair
2011 BMW S1000RR: The Barvarian Bullet
Married men don't live longer, it just seems longer.
Sour grapes are a lesser man's fruit.
SQD8R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2007, 02:38 PM   #81
John in Leeds
Gnarly Adventurer
 
John in Leeds's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Oddometer: 377
Hello Marc

Quote:
Originally Posted by marcjs
Hi John,

I have been reading your posts with great interest - thanks for taking the time to document your experiences with your Highland.

I will be in the UK the third week of June (funny enough, in your neck of the woods - Huddersfield), and would like very much if you'd share some more of your experiences over a pint or two at a watering-hole of your choice (l feel I'm entitled to indulge in the British vernacular, having returned to the States a couple of years ago following a 10-year stay in 'Blighty'). Let me know if you'll be around the last week of June .
It would be great to see you Marc and I will mail you shortly. Should be an interesting exchange and hopefully you can have a blat round and tell me what you think of my Outback.

You may also be interested in my first off road experiences today, it's been a long time coming but really worth it with the guidance of a long experienced Trail Riders Fellowship rider. Pics to follow
John in Leeds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2007, 05:05 AM   #82
John in Leeds
Gnarly Adventurer
 
John in Leeds's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Oddometer: 377
Off road at last

Great excitement for me the opportunity of a day in the Yorkshire dales. At last Dave had put aside the paint brush and agreed Saturday. It’s been a long time coming, there always something more important getting priority. How to tell it? Start at the beginning. I’m going to paste links to the pictures ‘cos they’re big files and I think they are worth the extra quality.

The bike had the off road wheels fitted with the nobblies and on the road I found the first few miles terrifying, the rear particularly was very loose with zero grip, hope it does better off road but I was not convinced and starting to be a little afraid. The 14 tooth gear sprocket and the larger rear made a fast walking pace possible giving the possibility of low speed control. The bark buster hand guards ordered from ORO in March had still not arrived, (on the high seas from China apparently), so on Dave’s advice I loosened the clamps on the clutch and brake leavers so they would hopefully rotate and not break in event of a tumble.



Dave is a very experienced trail rider having an encyclopaedic knowledge of routes in the Yorkshire area. He has done some enduros and the lads who ride with him reckon he can be quick and do the difficult stuff. My last experience showed he would also give me some very challenging sections. Some 5 years ago he took his Africa twin on the first off road I had done with my 1150gs. Needless to say I turned it over on the Deadmans decent, very much to my cost.

This time he was taking his Honda 250, a light speciality tail bike with near enough identical tyres to mine. Of course I was going to be seriously outgunned in both rider ability and machine off road capability. More stress but I was there to learn.

Start took us along some lower dale farm roads not to difficult and he did take it easy. Fortunately the land was dry with only little rain the previous day, bright and lovely sunshine and some dust blowing up when the throttle was tweaked. After that it was onto some real off road. You can see the comparison of machine sizes







I was finding the need to get a better control of the throttle as there was so much power, the more control of the bike I developed the better this was and the launch over holes and ditches was very welcome. The first ford was one to take particular care. The technique was to keep feet down for a dab as the stream bed was full of big slippery rocks, they were difficult to see and I still had not developed the control to do feet up. Dave also kept his feet down saying this crossing was one that he had been unseated into a number of times. Fortunately the level was quite low and through a combination of power to the back wheel and good luck I was over (trust Dave to offer an early baptism). I find that the natural position for riding the Outback is seated, it is not well suited to standing on the pegs but it is no worse for that.




One problem with the bike has been finding neutral when stationary, neutral easily found with the engine stopped, so that I did at all the gate openings as the engine starts easily warm or hot. The gearbox was faultless with not one missed changed, excellent!



Climbing rocky or greasy slopes seemed to be no bother, the tyres gripped well and were starting to give confidence. The suspension felt compliant making the ride comfortable and taking the steps and rocks totally in its stride, making even this rider look good.

Another ford but this one was easy. Sorry for the bullshine pic.



A few miles of proper moor top road were very difficult for me where the surface was tennis and billiard ball sized rocks. Dave just blasted away leaving me with the advice, ‘give it the berries, the bike will cope’, well probably the bike would but I was still not confident enough, as soon as the load comes back on the front wheel control becomes more difficult, and you have to slow down for bends, (the Highland goes bloody fast). Although I was making good progress I just could not relax and let it go.

On the top where the surface was better Dave asked for a dabble on the Outback. 2 pieces of video to come soon with Dave’s own pics, big files. I have never heard it from off the saddle before, the Highland bellow, awesome.

Video to come, please be patient, they are big files and I am going to have to reduce them.

Next some road work on tar the tyres starting to give some confidence but not being an off roader the ‘looseness’ is taking a bit of getting used to.

Next on to a most interesting piece of off road, called the ‘Scalectix’ or ‘slot’. The start of which was across a couple of fields over sheep cropped grass. We could see a paraglider and some hang gliders getting tremendous lift of an outcrop of rocks to one side of the track. Wonderful views.



The slot was a single narrow sheep track deeply sunk across the moor. Some big steps, rocks and short steep climbs. Unfortunately off road pics are like the ‘ones that got away’, you can’t stop easily to take photos of the really difficult stuff as you loose you rhythm and fall off more. Fortunately I did not fall of, well sort of, I was off the bike but to Dave’s amusement the bike stayed up in the ‘slot’. He called it a ‘tactical dismount’, ‘that bike will not go down’.




We stopped for a feed in Coverdale, I was getting hungry and tired and really fancied a long drink. Yorkshire puddings, minced beef and gravy together with a couple of pints of shandy to make up for all the lost sweat, sat outside in the beer garden, Top!

The next section over Deadmans, my last nemesis, ‘let’s see how you deal with this’ says Dave, ‘we’ll rate your progress at Middlesmoor’. The start of the track was a horror for me, all loose round stones with sharp rocky outcrops down the middle.






I tried and better tried to thwap it up the hill but just could not loosen up enough to make fast progress comfortable. Gained the top at good speed but I need to do better. Then on to the downgrade.

Five years ago the 1150GS would just not provide any engine braking in first gear, and although I was able to just keep the front brake on and off lock (I had been practicing pushing a locked front wheel) the back wheel locked, speed would not reduce with the enormous weight and I came off on the steep bend going down, bummer. Now you know the reason for the Highland.



The downhill was negotiated without incident, loads of engine braking and light weight took away all, well most of the fear, no problem.

Across the dam at Scar House, and on to the Middlesmoor trail. Five years ago I had got the GS stuck on a rock and could go no further, I had done enough damage. Though I was fitter and stronger then I could do no more and turned round back to the road.

This time Dave led up the rocky track, angular not round rocks with open spaces of clean rock, the Highland loved it, the suspension took the rocks with ease and composure, the easy power making full use of the grip, damn Dave was actually getting in the way, for this road the Highland was far faster, the bike not the rider. As Dave says the bikes are always better than we are.



Then the road home the tyres working far better along Gouthwaite side (fabulous road) but I’m still not used to the loose feeling of an off road bike on off road tyres. I’m learning but more practice required.

Many thanks to you Dave if you ever get to see this, I definitely owe you a few beers



More to come

John in Leeds screwed with this post 10-04-2007 at 12:06 PM
John in Leeds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2007, 11:33 AM   #83
John in Leeds
Gnarly Adventurer
 
John in Leeds's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Oddometer: 377
Some video

A couple of video clips of Dave having his first go. I know it's a motorway but it's fun just the same

These are now back on - limit removed

http://www.weetwood.force9.co.uk/images/dave1.mp4
http://www.weetwood.force9.co.uk/images/dave2.mp4


There will be a few more photos to come if anyone is interested - probably me having difficulty as I did not take them.

Also this ride has given me the opportunity to make an all round assessment of this bike

John in Leeds screwed with this post 08-05-2008 at 07:14 AM
John in Leeds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2007, 04:06 PM   #84
Cupid Stunt
Studly Adventurer
 
Cupid Stunt's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2004
Oddometer: 704
Fantastic stuff John, great pics, glad to see you getting it dirty at last, Dave certainly knows how to ride eh ?
Biggest stopper for heavy bikes is wet mud and bogs, one of the advantages is how heavy bikes track nicely and don't get deflected much

"give it the beans" is OK but misinterpreted means you can't continuously accelerate as at some point you have to slow
Rather the better advice is to keep a constant speed by applying continuos throttle, much like you do through a bend on the tarmac, just enough to maintain a slightly light front end but not increasing speed
Cupid Stunt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2007, 05:05 PM   #85
Schtum
Free Genie
 
Schtum's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2004
Location: Howe of Fife, Scotland.
Oddometer: 1,899
Quote:
Originally Posted by John in Leeds
What a shame, have seen the post http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=224496 but I am supporting my Mrs on the Edinburgh Moonwalk that weekend.
I don't suppose you're bringing the bike up to Edinburgh that weekend are you? I'm also one of those folks who would like to see one in the metal.

I've noticed you making a couple of references to Pokenhood. I don't know if he's still got his Highland. He did try to sell it for quite some time last year without a lot of success....

http://www.bikersoracle.com/central/...ead.php?t=1346

http://www.visordown.com/forums/showthread.php?t=243336

http://www.visordown.com/forums/showthread.php?t=254866

There's also this one up for sale at the moment which, judging by the mileage, isn't Pokenhood's old bike....

http://www.visordown.com/forums/showthread.php?t=320253
Schtum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2007, 12:32 AM   #86
John in Leeds
Gnarly Adventurer
 
John in Leeds's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Oddometer: 377
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cupid Stunt

"give it the beans" is OK but misinterpreted means you can't continuously accelerate as at some point you have to slow
Rather the better advice is to keep a constant speed by applying continuos throttle, much like you do through a bend on the tarmac, just enough to maintain a slightly light front end but not increasing speed
it seems to me the faster you are able to go the more the rear can be loaded, that is where the advantage comes. My more timid technique is as you say just keeping a reasonable speed. You then have a balance between the stabiity on the road and the ability to slow down in time for any obstructions that appear.

You also say the heavier bikes are a problem in the soft stuff - so that looks like it will be next port of call, let's hope it performs well there too


Thanks for your advice.

John in Leeds screwed with this post 05-29-2007 at 01:14 AM
John in Leeds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2007, 12:40 AM   #87
John in Leeds
Gnarly Adventurer
 
John in Leeds's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Oddometer: 377
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schtum
I don't suppose you're bringing the bike up to Edinburgh that weekend are you? I'm also one of those folks who would like to see one in the metal.

I've noticed you making a couple of references to Pokenhood. I don't know if he's still got his Highland. He did try to sell it for quite some time last year without a lot of success....

Poke's bike is long gone - February I think.

Unfortunately the Edinburgh trip will be with the tribe so no bikes.
John in Leeds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2007, 06:55 PM   #88
marcjs
Chi-Town Outback
 
marcjs's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2007
Location: Chicago North Shore
Oddometer: 14
Highland Allroad For Sale in Chicago

If anyone following this thread is interested, I have posted my (unused) 2004 Highland 950 Allroad up for sale in the 'flea market' section. (follow this link)

Although I have a European party interested, I would prefer to sell it in North America after all the hassle I went through to title and register it!!!
__________________
"Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe."

- Albert Einstein

marcjs screwed with this post 06-13-2007 at 08:25 PM Reason: typo in title
marcjs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2007, 08:48 PM   #89
marcjs
Chi-Town Outback
 
marcjs's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2007
Location: Chicago North Shore
Oddometer: 14
Highland Motard Also For Sale in Chicago

I have added my Motard to my 'Flea Market' listing. I am selling either-or. If interested follow the link in my previous listing.

John, I am looking forward to hooking up with you after I arrive in the UK next week. My torn ligament in my knee is healing-up fairly quickly and I am very tempted to take one of the bikes for a ride...but I'd better wait .
__________________
"Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe."

- Albert Einstein
marcjs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2007, 02:32 PM   #90
John in Leeds
Gnarly Adventurer
 
John in Leeds's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Oddometer: 377
You ought to take look at this!

Just take a peep at this new Highland DirtTrack

http://www.highland.se/pages.asp?pageID=25&childPage=11

Check out the weight at 129kgs and looks like they have solved the bottom end power delivery problem. They are using the twin inlet system. Could be easy to map for loads more power too.


John in Leeds screwed with this post 06-29-2007 at 03:35 AM
John in Leeds is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 01:02 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014