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Old 11-13-2009, 06:55 PM   #29116
goodcat8
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Joined: Feb 2008
Location: Los Angeles
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Little Shake - Little Shimmey

Just now I felt alittle shake/tremble/vibration in the front end upon hard braking. Im attributing this to one of two things.....

1) Warped front brake rotor (its stock, and riddin haaaard)
2) Head bearings (from not always setting the front end down as nicely as I should, post wheelie)

I've felt this before on prior sport bikes (from reasons mentioned above) just curious if the DR is prone to either of above.

Viva La DR
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Old 11-13-2009, 10:23 PM   #29117
Inprogress
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Great!!! I will find out from the original owner if he did anything to the jetting, if he didn't, chances are the other two didn't do a thing. To get an idea, what is the mileage figures on standard jetting? I can get 23km/liter. When riding hardish, I get about 20km/liter. I wish I resettled my speedo cause I think the last tank was a bit lower than 20km/liter, but had no concrete way of telling.

The bike doesn't backfire at all if I coast to a stop (no clutch), which I understand is a sign of lean jetting (if you get the popping when coasting by just closing the throttle). So from at least that indicator, I'm not running lean.

Thanks for the info though. Maybe I will ceramic coat the header....maybe not.....it money I could put in the tank.

Thanks for all the info guys and gals.

Happy trails

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Old 11-14-2009, 01:56 AM   #29118
NordieBoy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph64
17" front?
Damn. Only 19 and 21 for the front .
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Old 11-14-2009, 02:00 AM   #29119
NordieBoy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Inprogress
Great!!! I will find out from the original owner if he did anything to the jetting, if he didn't, chances are the other two didn't do a thing. To get an idea, what is the mileage figures on standard jetting? I can get 23km/liter. When riding hardish, I get about 20km/liter. I wish I resettled my speedo cause I think the last tank was a bit lower than 20km/liter, but had no concrete way of telling.

The bike doesn't backfire at all if I coast to a stop (no clutch), which I understand is a sign of lean jetting (if you get the popping when coasting by just closing the throttle). So from at least that indicator, I'm not running lean.
23km/l sounds lean.
No popping on decel dosn't seems weird.

The BST should pop on decel if jetted correctly.
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Old 11-14-2009, 02:37 AM   #29120
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EDIT: Checked my plugs and I could be running lean, but I haven't checked the gap (Stupid stupid stupid) so I will do that in a while when its cool again.

I will go and check in the meantime, is there a site which lists the bolt sizes that is on the bike? I need to replace my header flange bolts and I can give you a letter our local dealer and not even the South African HQ will have the bolts in stock. It takes 5 to 6 weeks to order sir. I order stuff from the USA, a shop (not a dealer) and it takes 10 days. Stupid dealers here.

mmmmmmmmmmm, peculiar.

I need some more scientific info. I found this here.

In previous stories I talked about carburetors Rich conditions and Lean Conditions, this is all fine of course if you know how to detect if your engine carburetor is set Rich or Lean.

To help with that, I will explain simple means to detect the setting of your bike. With a perfectly tuned engine you will get the power you need, it amazes me sometimes what people spent on kits to improve performance, while all they needed to do is get the settings right.

Okay that said what is a Rich Condition, while a black, scooty spark plug is a sure sign of richness, there are other indicators that are a bit subtler and better ways of dialing in the carburetor jetting.

If your engine responds crispy at low throttle when it is cold, chances are the main jet is one size larger than it needs to be. Assuming, of course, that the idle circuit is correctly tuned.

Poor fuel mileage is another sign of richness and because of the way most of us ride our motorcycles, that richness is unusually the result of a needle that is too small.

The color of the end of the exhaust pipe is a sign of mixture strength. Dark gray with some black is normal with today's lead-free fuels. If the exhaust color is black, chances are you can drop the size of the main jet.

It may be that you prefer a main jet that is slightly on the rich side of the correct range. A slightly over-rich condition lets a motorcycle accelerate better at low rpm.

So that was that about a Rich Condition and what about detecting a Lean Condition, a lean condition can quickly become a problem as the engine begins to self-destruct with detonation. Extremely with holes in pistons, burnt valves, and power loss top the list of reasons to make sure the jetting is on the money.

Pinging and knocking, poor acceleration, surging, and excessive popping during deceleration are all good signs of too lean a mixture. Also, if the bike seems to take a very long time to warm up or needs the choke longer than other bikes, chances are some tweaking of the jetting may be in order.


You will notice the popping I mention. From other posts on TT, I see the average (taking into account the posts) 45mpg (19km/liter). Mine might be a tad lean. Haven't heard anything from the original owner yet though.

Mine does not start right off the bat when cold, few churns. But can get of the choke in about 30 seconds. I will have to check the plugs and post pikkies for your review. But before I do that, I'm gonna go for a quick spin.

Happy trails.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NordieBoy
23km/l sounds lean.
No popping on decel dosn't seems weird.

The BST should pop on decel if jetted correctly.
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Inprogress screwed with this post 11-14-2009 at 06:49 AM
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Old 11-14-2009, 03:19 AM   #29121
Blake Kennedy
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Joined: Nov 2009
Location: Tasmania, Australia
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New member, New DR650!

Hey all,

I have been lurking around for a little bit reading heaps of great ideas but I have a question.

What things would any of you guys that have owned a DR650 do to it from new as far as prevenative mods / performance mods?
The bike is being supplied with a full staintune system and the carby jetted to suit by the dealer. What else should I do to make sure my new toy stays in good nick? It will be used for a daily ride for the run in period then will start sunday adventure rides.
on the list is a B & B bash plate and frame gaurds before I take it off road.
I am located in Tasmania, Australia.
Thanks in advance, Blake
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Old 11-14-2009, 04:50 AM   #29122
tjoseph
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Tasmian - devil?

I'm not all that big on engine mods, because I think for the most part you really don't get useable power, just the perception. But that's just me.

You'll want some sort of luggage rack. You'll want to remove the upper chain roller/guide. You might want to get a one-tooth-smaller front sprocket, although that depends on your highway/dirt ratio.

I find that a big "performance difference" is made by simply having a luggage rack and carry bag. Into that I toss one of those tiny cigarette-lighter-powered air compressor (or even a bicycle hand pump). I replaced the cigarette-lighter plug with a plug that fits into my trickle-charger lead from the battery (oh yea, you might want to add a trickle-charger and lead). That way I can drop the air pressure on my tires when I'm hitting the dirt, and then easily pump them back up when I get back on the pavement. Makes a big difference.

Eventually, you'll probably want stiffer springs, upgraded shock, or the fork "emulator" inserts. Depends on how you ride, and what you like. People love to complain about the suspension, but like any dual-sport, it is a compromise from the factory by design. It's like a suit off the rack. For a select few, it fits perfect as is. Most riders need to tailor the suspension to suit themselves (no pun intended). Welcome, and good luck.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blake Kennedy
Hey all,

I have been lurking around for a little bit reading heaps of great ideas but I have a question.

What things would any of you guys that have owned a DR650 do to it from new as far as prevenative mods / performance mods?
The bike is being supplied with a full staintune system and the carby jetted to suit by the dealer. What else should I do to make sure my new toy stays in good nick? It will be used for a daily ride for the run in period then will start sunday adventure rides.
on the list is a B & B bash plate and frame gaurds before I take it off road.
I am located in Tasmania, Australia.
Thanks in advance, Blake
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Old 11-14-2009, 05:48 AM   #29123
TheFrenchCanadian
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220*f ??

Quote:
Originally Posted by ER70S-2
I found this:

"Petroleum oil begins to break-down almost immediately. A high quality synthetic, on the other hand, can last for many thousands of miles without any significant reduction in performance or protection characteristics. Synthetics designed from the right combination of basestocks and additives can last almost indefinitely with the right filtration system."

Here:

http://www.carjunky.com/news/motor_oil/mom2.shtml

Dino oil is ok up to 220* or so. I've seen my DR at 275*. Oil is only as strong as its weakest link. So a semi-synthetic oil will reach its flash point at the lower temperature of conventional oil...
So where did you get the idea that conventional dino juice breaks down at 220*? I just read through the article you quoted and found this:

"Even the best petroleum oils will have flash points only as high as 390 and 440 degrees F. Some actually have flashpoints as low as 350 degrees...
...Just about any synthetic you come across will have a flashpoint over 440 degrees. Premium synthetics can have flashpoints over 450 degrees with some even reaching as high as 500 degrees."

Couldn't find any mention of 220* anywhere in that article. You'll notice the numbers given are only about 60* apart if you compare premium dino oil to premium synthetic & in the end, there is little difference between premium conventional oil and a low end synthetic. I think that the 220* figure is way too low & the numbers quoted in the article are probably closer to the truth.

Don't get me wrong, I'm a believer in synthetics too, been running nothing but in all my bikes for the last 15 years. I use them primarily because I like how smooth shifting they make my bikes and the fact they resist breakdown from running through the gearbox, which is something that doesn't occur in a vehicle with a separate engine/transmission. The higher flashpoint is simply a bonus.

Just my $0.02
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Old 11-14-2009, 06:37 AM   #29124
thumpididump
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I didn't read the article but 220 sounded incredibly low to me, so I just assumed it must be Celcius not Fahrenheit. 220C = 428F.


Quote:
Originally Posted by TheFrenchCanadian
So where did you get the idea that conventional dino juice breaks down at 220*? I just read through the article you quoted and found this:

"Even the best petroleum oils will have flash points only as high as 390 and 440 degrees F. Some actually have flashpoints as low as 350 degrees...
...Just about any synthetic you come across will have a flashpoint over 440 degrees. Premium synthetics can have flashpoints over 450 degrees with some even reaching as high as 500 degrees."

Couldn't find any mention of 220* anywhere in that article. You'll notice the numbers given are only about 60* apart if you compare premium dino oil to premium synthetic & in the end, there is little difference between premium conventional oil and a low end synthetic. I think that the 220* figure is way too low & the numbers quoted in the article are probably closer to the truth.

Don't get me wrong, I'm a believer in synthetics too, been running nothing but in all my bikes for the last 15 years. I use them primarily because I like how smooth shifting they make my bikes and the fact they resist breakdown from running through the gearbox, which is something that doesn't occur in a vehicle with a separate engine/transmission. The higher flashpoint is simply a bonus.

Just my $0.02
TFC
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Old 11-14-2009, 08:49 AM   #29125
newride
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Cycra Probends

So I now have heated grips on the DR! Not sure how I lived life without them. Thanks to GETRAD! I mostly stood there getting in the way.

All excited I go install the last pieces (the Cycra probend lever guards) and they don't remotely fit. WTF? how could I have missed that? I have hi bend bars and it looks like I will have to cut my balls off (AHHHH!) if they were ever to fit.
I have some spacers give to me by a friend that might work but I don't know yet.
I know this thread has been done to death, but I got most of understanding they have work for many others with not too much problems. The guys at Thumper Talk suggested they should fit. Hmmmmm,
Did anyone have to return theirs?
As always,
Thanks
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Old 11-14-2009, 09:56 AM   #29126
Inprogress
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Location: Port Elizabeth, South Africa
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DR650SE head rebuild

So I think I know why I am experiencing my engine heating phenomenon.......I think I need a rebuild. Now I will check the compression sometime. Why do I say rebuild??? Well, 67,000km. Before I bought it I heard is uses a little oil when ridden hard, but then I'm not sure I have ridden it so hard that in two weeks it went from just about FULL to below LOW level in the level glass. Did roughly 1200km.

Now the question is: The cheap kit to buy is the JE High compression which increases to 10.5:1 hey? Is there other kits available that doesn't increase the compression? What effects does this higher compression have on power, wear, fuel consumption? Does the bike vibrate more?

What should I replace (not what could I replace as well whilst I'm in there - been there, done that, got the receipts) along with the new piston, rings etc? Should the barrel be bored or not required? Could I get away with just new rings?

In the mean time I will note the oil consumption and not ride as hard anymore, plus get that compression checked to see how severe and how soon I should rebuild.

Off course this rebuild opens another door, that of redo the frame etc (ugh that took long the last time, but I learned a lot).

How do you spray the engine, specifically how do you make sure you get right in between the fins without having drops of paint on the edge of the fins?

Some of these questions might not lead anywhere, but I need to know so that I can formulate a plan plus make sure I get all the parts I need to do the job in one week, maybe two. In other words, get parts A through K, and away you go.


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Old 11-14-2009, 12:09 PM   #29127
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Conventional RM forks for the 650

wanted to share a mod i just finished on my '02 dr650. a few years back, i put a set of '88 RM250 forks on a dr 350 and it made a huge difference when offroad. since the forks on the 650 are also 43mm, i thought this bike would also benefit from the RM cartridges.
i recently bought the 650 and went for a ride on our fine boulder infested roads in the arizona mountains. first of all, the rear spring preload was turned all the way tight and the static sag was about 5". the front end while feeling like a cadillac at 5 mph would clank and deflect any time you tried to pick up the speed. overall, i was not pleased.
bought a set of 88 RM250 forks off ebay (125's also are the same, but softer springs and prolly different shims in the valves). i believe both '87 and '88 RMs used the 43mm cartridges.
fitting them up i noticed that the rm was about 3" longer at the axle, and the overhang for the cartridge made the overall about 6" longer. the dr axle was a perfect fit.
the mount for the brake caliper was totally different, so i used a piece of 3/8 steel flat stock i had laying around and cut it to 165x50mm. i used a drawing caliper to measure center to center holes on the rm forks and drilled holes to match. i then mounted up the wheel and clamped the brake caliper in place on the disc so that it sat exactly wher it used to sit. i held it in place using a rubber band around the brake lever. i then measured the distance from the bottom hole of the fork tube to the bottom hole of the caliper and drilled it so it was level across from the fork hole. i measured the top hole of the fork to the top hole in the caliper and then the distance from the bottom to the top hole in the caliper. using the drawing caliper, i scribed an arc for each and an opposing arc to make an x for the new mount holes.
using a small cutoff wheel, i approximated the shape of the new bracket by holding it up to the fork and seeing what had to be removed. finished it up on the grinder and it fits perfectly. if i had aluminum stock, i would have used it. but the price of the steel was right (third project for this piece). the bracket as mounted was 8mm too far outboard to sit against the brake caliper so i used two 9/16 nuts as spacers...perfect.
the finished product makes the bike sit a bit higher, but not so you'd notice.
i also remedied the rear spring problem by replacing the stock spring with a leftover spring from my husaberg 650 (a 76/96) using a steel sleeve and a large washer at the top. gone is the excessive static sag. could use some rebound adjust, but we'll see how long it lasts.
its like a whole new bike. still rides soft enough, but handles the rocks and whoops like a real dualsport should.
total cost including rebuilding the forks was about $150.
img> http://www.flickr.com/photos/2690573...7622678343149/
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Old 11-14-2009, 12:54 PM   #29128
NordieBoy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Inprogress
I can give you a letter our local dealer and not even the South African HQ will have the bolts in stock. It takes 5 to 6 weeks to order sir. I order stuff from the USA, a shop (not a dealer) and it takes 10 days. Stupid dealers here.
The dealer has to use the local importer to get stuff.
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Old 11-14-2009, 12:57 PM   #29129
NordieBoy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tjoseph
I'm not all that big on engine mods, because I think for the most part you really don't get useable power, just the perception. But that's just me.
So you don't think that having the torque at 3000rpm that the stock bike does at peak (5000rpm) is useful?

Dynojet kit + open pipe.
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Old 11-14-2009, 01:54 PM   #29130
Blake Kennedy
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Joined: Nov 2009
Location: Tasmania, Australia
Oddometer: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by NordieBoy
So you don't think that having the torque at 3000rpm that the stock bike does at peak (5000rpm) is useful?

Dynojet kit + open pipe.
Where would I get a good price on a dynojet kit delivered to Aus from?
Are there different models? i.e jet sizes?
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