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Old 04-09-2012, 11:01 PM   #62671
procycle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DirtySumo View Post
No. Ordered a rim with a DR650 front hub as a mate. Got to be sure those spoke hole angles are stress-free for the spokes. BE SURE OF THAT, ok? Evil things can happen if you don't. Do not use a DR rear rim.
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Old 04-09-2012, 11:02 PM   #62672
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Originally Posted by LexTalionis View Post
Times have changed. $5400 OTD in the San Francisco Bay March of 2009. I like to buy locally, support the local industry;
Quote:
Originally Posted by LexTalionis View Post
my dealership folded anyway due to the most recent Great Depression.

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"BTW, I don't do style. It's a dirt bike, not some girlie dress-up thing." -
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Old 04-10-2012, 12:51 AM   #62673
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Old 04-10-2012, 07:26 AM   #62674
Dravintoad
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Location: Fayetteville, AR
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Hey guys. I've got a little oil leak. Looks like it's the cam chain tensioner gasket.

Has anyone just used some permatex/gasket maker for this as opposed to a replacement gasket. I think I'd rather do this than buy another OEM gasket.

I have some red high temp and some of the ultra black, which do you think would be better? I'm thinking the red, but the Ultra black has better oil resistance.



Thanks...
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Old 04-10-2012, 07:32 AM   #62675
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I used permatex ultra-grey. I have only put maybe 600 miles on since then, but no leaks yet. I got the recommendation to use that on this site, IIRC

EDIT: actually, it was here

http://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/613...r-gasket-leak/

Make sure to read up on proper removal and re-install of the CCT.

The OEM gasket is a bitch to get off. I ended up using a razor blade which put some nices on the cylinder where the gasket was. I figured the permatex would fill in those imperfections, which is seems to have done just fine.
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Old 04-10-2012, 07:49 AM   #62676
Dravintoad
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Motodeficient View Post
I used permatex ultra-grey. I have only put maybe 600 miles on since then, but no leaks yet. I got the recommendation to use that on this site, IIRC

EDIT: actually, it was here

http://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/613...r-gasket-leak/

Make sure to read up on proper removal and re-install of the CCT.

The OEM gasket is a bitch to get off. I ended up using a razor blade which put some nices on the cylinder where the gasket was. I figured the permatex would fill in those imperfections, which is seems to have done just fine.
Thanks. I read through that when researching the leak. Looks like a nice write-up.

I appreciate the heads-up for the gasket removal. I've had to do this with other gaskets, so I didn't really expect it would be an easier. But it's small and a little hard to get to, so I'm sure will cuss it a couple of times.
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Old 04-10-2012, 07:51 AM   #62677
Motodeficient
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I have posted this before, but if you spring some baby powder, or even better use spray-on athlete's foot powder, on the engine and then take it for a ride, you can be sure of where the leak is coming from before you dig in.
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Old 04-10-2012, 08:00 AM   #62678
Dravintoad
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Motodeficient View Post
I have posted this before, but if you spring some baby powder, or even better use spray-on athlete's foot powder, on the engine and then take it for a ride, you can be sure of where the leak is coming from before you dig in.
Thanks for the tip. I've done that with some baby powder, that's why I was relieved when it wasn't my base gasket.
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Old 04-10-2012, 08:57 AM   #62679
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Location: Western PA
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Originally Posted by metalmanipulator View Post
hellow fellow inmates new guy here just wanted to say hi i just bought a 2012 dr650 and have a question on lowering ( i know another lowering question) the factory way. im looking at the manual and although i have not taken apart forks before the instructions look streight foward my question is why do i need to take the forks off ,other than loosing the oil, dont you pull the top cap off stick in your special tool and unbolt the bottom bolt and fish every thing out the top? ( rember i am just swaping the spacer)or am i missing something ? im a diesel mech. work on hyds. and fabractor so i have the tools and the abilty just need your expert advice from someone thats worked on forks befor ,thanx for the great site, Shawn
I guess you could do the job with forks (and wheel) on bike but you will still be draining the fork oil since the bolt that holds the damper needs to be removed and the oil will drain anyway. Removing/reinstalling wheel and fork shouldn't add more than 20 min. and you get the joy of getting up close and personal with more of your new toy.
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Old 04-10-2012, 09:16 AM   #62680
Bronco638
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Location: Itasca, IL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adv Grifter
There is a small Japanese company in Hamamatsu, Japan that goes to a lot of trouble to make parts that actually fit your Carb. If your eye is really good, perhaps you can pick out an O ring that is a perfect match. I'd order from Suzuki and get the real thing. Also ... are the O rings at Ace hardware fuel and Ethanol resistant like Japanese ones? I'm still on my original O rings at 45K miles.
Well, I had planned to measure them with a digital caliper. But, you make a good point about them being fuel/ethanol resistant. I don't know the answer to that question. Mine have half the mileage as yours but both show dirt (the carb was filthy). I figured now was as good a time as any to replace them, what with the entire carb in a state of dis-assembly.
Quote:
Originally Posted by GaThumper
You can also order from Sudco. That's what I did and they had all the parts I needed at a better price than Suzuki.

http://www.sudco.com/
I may try that. Perhaps they'll ship today and arrive by the weekend. Thanks.
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Old 04-10-2012, 09:19 AM   #62681
maynard911
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zdiver1 View Post
So how is that SuperBrace on the front forks working out? That is about the only thing on PC website I have not ordered.

I purchased a Superbrace from Procycle and installed it per instructions. Measuring between the brace and the fender mounting bosses (fender removed) with the front supported off the ground there is 8 1/4 inches of clearance.With the fender installed it would be an inch or so less. My bike is not lowered. The front suspension travel is supposed to be 10.2 inches, so the brace is going to be hitting hard parts long before the fork gets to the end of travel. If you look closely at DirtySumo's picture (post 62853) you can see that there is nothing like 10+ inches of clearance. I have emailed both the maker and Procycle about the problem, but have not yet received a reply, when I do I will post it here.
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Old 04-10-2012, 09:49 AM   #62682
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GaThumper
You can also order from Sudco. That's what I did and they had all the parts I needed at a better price than Suzuki.

http://www.sudco.com/
I called Sudco and they told me they do not carry parts for the BST40 carb. Those parts are Suzuki only. Unless I could provide them with Sudco part numbers, they could not help me. That's disappointing.
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Old 04-10-2012, 11:22 AM   #62683
Rusty Rocket
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GaThumper View Post
You can also order from Sudco. That's what I did and they had all the parts I needed at a better price than Suzuki.

http://www.sudco.com/
I can't find the BST there. I just had to order the float assy o-rings for my DR650 from the dealer yesterday. They had one but not the other in stock I just did them a year and a half ago. This ethanol is awful. I should'a ordered from ProCycle and they'd have been here tomorrow and I'd have saved the gas money.
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Old 04-10-2012, 11:29 AM   #62684
LexTalionis
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Replacing shock spring

If you’re thinking of installing a heavier shock spring rather than replacing the entire shock, here’s my experience.

I weigh 235lbs wearing street clothing, don’t know how much more my riding gear weighs but it’s the usual amount. I always carry 20-25lbs of miscellaneous stuff in the tailbag or saddlebags. My bike is a single-seater, I’ve removed the passenger pegs; at 6’2”, there’s no room for a passenger. Riding is 20% freeway, 75% “spirited riding” on paved and sometimes rough mountain roads, 5% dirt forest roads.

I had the OEM shock spring adjusting collars all the way down, and was happy with the ride. But, I couldn’t carry camping gear, the spring compression was maxed out. So I bought ProCycle’s heavier spring of the two offered. Now, fully loaded with camping gear, the ride is plush and there’s still 1.25” of thread left under the adjusting collars. Rebound dampening is set at 3 full rotations counterclockwise; the spring does not overwhelm the dampener for my usage.

I had read different ways of doing the job: taking the shock off from the top or the bottom, or just dropping the spring off the bottom. I did what appeared to me to be the easiest way, leaving the shock in the bike, dropping off the spring. My main concern was how to take the pressure off the linkage when removing the bolts. Here’s what I did.

Back off adjusting collars to near top of shock using a hammer and a drift – will take a few minutes of easy work.
Raise bike on lift; lifting arms under motor.
Lift bike far enough to put 8” support under rear wheel; I used four pavers I had laying around; you could get by with less support, though I don’t know how much less.
Lower bike until the bike’s weight begins to come off the lift; the rear wheel will then be raised as close to the fender as it will go.
Tie down bike to lift.



Remove dogbones – be careful not to cause inner tubes/races to fall out.
Remove bottom shock bolt.
Remove “Y” bracket – be careful not to cause inner tubes/races to fall out.
Push up thick U-shaped piece at bottom of shock until it clears the bottom of the shock and can be pulled off shock; may have to first push rubber conical bumper up on shock shaft – high friction.
Spring and a couple other parts drop off bottom of shock shaft.

Take the parts containing bearings to your workbench, carefully push out the inner race/tube, lube the needle bearings (mine all had a light coating of OEM grease), carefully reinstall the inner race/tube.

Reinstallation is reverse of the above, taking care not to push out the inner race/tube when inserting the bolts. I adjusted the lift height minutely to get the bolt holes to line up.
Dogbone bolt nut torque is 72.5lb-ft or 100N-m.
The front nut on the “Y” piece is 58.0lb-ft or 80N-m, however there’s no way you can get a torque wrench on that nut.
Shock bolt torque is recommended at 37N-m by Rick at Cogent Dynamics, using medium strength threadlocker (blue Loctite); the spec in the manual is WRONG and may result in stripped threads.

Overall, an easy operation.

Lex
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Old 04-10-2012, 11:30 AM   #62685
Rusty Rocket
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bronco638 View Post
Well, I had planned to measure them with a digital caliper. But, you make a good point about them being fuel/ethanol resistant.
Do it. I just ordered the stock o-rings and they cosy $10+ for the pair and they lasted less than 2 years. Harbor Freight sells an O_RING KIT for about $10 that has 397 o-rings in it and BTW, I just discovered, IT"S ON SALE!!!!

http://www.harborfreight.com/397-pie...ent-67580.html

so what if they don't last, I can switch'em without removing the carb from the bike and fix it for less than 20 cents and save gas from not driving to the dealer. Bet they last as long or longer than stock.
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