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Old 05-25-2012, 11:56 PM   #64921
XPLRN
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DR650 Operator Foot Peg Drop Brackets Info

Quote:
Originally Posted by XPLRN View Post
Almost four years ago a local machining/fabrication guy came up with a unique drop bracket configuration for the operator foot pegs on the 1996 and newer DR650. This configuration utilizes the Suzuki designed vibration isolation feature. This drop bracket configuration is best for folks that ride mostly street/gravel roads and are not doing that much 'stand up' riding off-road. This is due to the lowering of the foot pegs beneath the frame and the vibration isolation feature was designed for a mostly seated rider.

Anyways he's still got 6-7 bracket sets from this one time CNC production run and wants to get rid of them.......first come first serve..........when they are gone that's it. He has reduced the price to $60 shipped vs. the $75 previously (Paypal fees extra). The guy that had him design and manufacture these drop brackets posted up a review of them...........read thru the links below for more info, pictures and his contact info if interested


http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...ostcount=16710

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...ostcount=16712

Quote:
Originally Posted by NordieBoy View Post
There's a good chance he didn't come up with a "unique drop bracket configuration"...

This post mentions getting the idea from TrailZone Magazine...
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...postcount=1665

And there's been CAD drawings on this site for almost 4 years too...
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...postcount=1669
Quote:
Originally Posted by XPLRN View Post
What is "unique" about this drop bracket is the CNC machined design that allows the Suzuki factory engineered vibration dampening design of the foot peg to still function. It seems Suzuki recognized vibration output of a 650c.c. thumper and saw fit to incorporate a vibration dampening design into the operator footpegs. Think how much they could have saved(more corporate profit) over the past 16+ years IF they wouldn't have tooled up to make the operator foot pegs the way they did!?? Now I'm wondering if the pre-1996 DR650's had the vibration isolation feature in the operator foot pegs?? Most everything else(the two links above and others) uses a bolt through/clamp design that eliminates the Suzuki designed vibration dampening feature.

Each to their own on how to deal with the vibrations of their DR650.......I was happy to get a setup that incorporated the Suzuki designed vibration dampening.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NordieBoy View Post
Nope. The 2 links mentioned use the stock damping rubbers and allow the foot pegs to flex the same as stock.
The centre bushing through the damping rubbers allows the peg to stand slightly proud of the drop bracket. I measure about a 10mm drop under load at the end of the foot peg.

It's a mellow Saturday evening and I've got some time to address the above "Nope" response. Maybe some pictures will help........this is a stock DR650 operator foot peg assembly with two rubber dampening bushings and center metal sleeves/bushings that the bolts clamp thru to hold it to the *round* mounting stand-offs coming off the frame tube. This is stuff that most DR650 owners have seen before if they have removed their operator foot peg brackets.

Here it is all bolted together;


Here are the two stand-offs from the frame after the operator foot peg assembly has been removed;


Here is a picture of the stock Suzuki designed operator foot peg.


This picture illustrates that the metal center bushing in the middle of the dampening rubbers is actually shorter in length than the outside width of the operator foot peg bracket ;



As can be seen in the above pictures Suzuki designed the DR650 operator foot peg bracket mounting to reduce the vibrations the 650c.c. single cylinder thumper engine puts out. Since vibration is omnidirectional ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omnidirectional ) they went with a design that "floated" the operator foot peg bracket on the two rubber dampening bushings that were held onto the frame by the bolts clamping the steel center bushings to the *round* mounting stand-offs.

The logical reason the mounting stand-offs are round is that the rubber dampening bushings are round. The two flanged mounting bolts hold the *round* rubber bushings against the *round* mounting stand-offs when clamping the steel center bushings in the mounting of the operator foot peg bracket to the frame. This provides "isolation" from the frame where the solid mounted engine vibrations come from.


In the picture below the green dotted circle shows where the metal center bushing is clamped to the *round* mounting stand-off. The blue dotted circle shows where the compressed rubber dampening material contacts the *round* mounting stand-off. There is **no** contact between the operator foot peg bracket and the mounting stand-offs as the operator foot peg bracket is "floated" on the rubber dampening material away from the frame mounted stand-off. In normal seated riding the rubber dampening material is doing it's job of reducing the transmitted engine vibration to the operator's feet. If someone rides standing up a lot or over time the rubber dampening material can get deformed/pounded out and that could allow engine vibration to be transmitted from the frame to the operator's feet.


This picture shows a flat plate with **no** round stand-offs to allow the rubber dampening bushings to be isolated and "float" the operator foot peg bracket. Soo when the mounting bolts clamp the operator foot peg bracket to a flat plate there is direct metal contact and the Suzuki designed omnidirectional vibration feature is negated.


I understand that some people don't give a care about the vibration transmitted thru the foot pegs when the Suzuki designed omnidirectional vibration feature is negated. I still believe that IF Suzuki engineers didn't understand that vibration was a issue for seated distance riding they would NOT have went to all the design work of incorporating the rubber dampening material in the operator foot peg assemblies. Heck think of all the money they would have saved since 1996 if they had just bolted a metal foot peg bracket assembly to the flat plate welded to the frame tube without any thought of vibration dampening.

This picture shows the CNC machined drop bracket for the operator foot peg assembly....I chose to coat mine with spray-on truck bed liner material. There is a round stand-off that duplicates the diameter of the original round stand-of on the DR650 frame.


Also there is a hardened washer(slightly smaller diameter than the stand-off) that goes up against the machined aluminum stand-off surface to take the clamp load of the steel bushing when the operator foot peg is mounted to the drop bracket. Here is a picture that shows that;


The reason I put the asterisks around the word *round* in all the above verbage is that Suzuki designed it that way......using round rubber bushings that seat up against round stand-offs from the frame to reduce vibration to the operator's feet. As stated above they could have saved A LOT of money over this 16+ year production run if they would have just eliminated the vibration dampening feature of the operator foot peg

PS..........my bike was the test bike for the prototyping of these drop brackets so that is why I have the above info.

XPLRN screwed with this post 05-26-2012 at 12:09 AM
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Old 05-26-2012, 12:01 AM   #64922
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 955616846 View Post
Also, the FCR usually costs more than a TM for no gain.
The FCR has an air-cut valve that reduces decel popping with a free-flowing exhaust. It's moving parts are also protected better against mud and grime.
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Old 05-26-2012, 12:31 AM   #64923
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Opened airbox per Jesse specs, unmodified oem exhaust, Dynojet kit with Jesse's suggestion of 155 DJ mainjet for said exhaust, Kientech extended fuel screw aprox. 1 1/4 turns out, drilled slide and most importantly DJ needle's clip leaned to 3 down from the top, to TOTALLY eliminate the rich off idle flat spot, at 2200' asl elevation.

Two identical bikes (07 & 08) set up this way (skipped drilling the slide on the second and retained backfire screen as well), both run great with excellent gas mileage figures and I look forward to grabbing a couple of inexpensive, discarded low mileage BST40's somewhere down the road, for high mileage replacements.

Financial advantages over FCR and TM40 alternatives, priceless.

Each to their own, but horror stories of rejetted BST40's, is so fucking amusing.

996DL
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Old 05-26-2012, 01:18 AM   #64924
doug s.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 996DL View Post
Opened airbox per Jesse specs, unmodified oem exhaust, Dynojet kit with Jesse's suggestion of 155 DJ mainjet for said exhaust, Kientech extended fuel screw aprox. 1 1/4 turns out, drilled slide and most importantly DJ needle's clip leaned to 3 down from the top, to TOTALLY eliminate the rich off idle flat spot, at 2200' asl elevation.

Two identical bikes (07 & 08) set up this way (skipped drilling the slide on the second and retained backfire screen as well), both run great with excellent gas mileage figures and I look forward to grabbing a couple of inexpensive, discarded low mileage BST40's somewhere down the road, for high mileage replacements.

Financial advantages over FCR and TM40 alternatives, priceless.

Each to their own, but horror stories of rejetted BST40's, is so fucking amusing.

996DL
yust don't ever ride a dr650 w/a properly set up tm40 or fcr39 carb, and you will remain happy. my bike ran fine w/the stock carb. but now, it really runs great...

doug s.
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Old 05-26-2012, 01:36 AM   #64925
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doug s. View Post
yust don't ever ride a dr650 w/a properly set up tm40 or fcr39 carb, and you will remain happy. my bike ran fine w/the stock carb. but now, it really runs great...

doug s.

Some people like that rubber band throttle cable feeling. It keeps things from happening too quickly.

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Old 05-26-2012, 02:17 AM   #64926
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Originally Posted by ER70S-2 View Post
DAMN!!! There's sum rokz.

There are also ample opportunities to make a mistake that would ruin yer whole week!!!

Rockin' good tunes, too.
The 1150 rider put his foot down at the wrong time and the rock moved...
Torn muscles up the back of his leg.
That's why I got to ride the 1150...
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Old 05-26-2012, 02:29 AM   #64927
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XPLRN View Post
The reason I put the asterisks around the word *round* in all the above verbage is that Suzuki designed it that way......using round rubber bushings that seat up against round stand-offs from the frame to reduce vibration to the operator's feet. As stated above they could have saved A LOT of money over this 16+ year production run if they would have just eliminated the vibration dampening feature of the operator foot peg

PS..........my bike was the test bike for the prototyping of these drop brackets so that is why I have the above info.
Even with flush mounting against the plates, the tip of the footpeg moves about 5-10mm.

I even used a large washer on the outside to try to reduce the movement.
The washers just bent.
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Old 05-26-2012, 06:01 AM   #64928
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I like this idea. I was very disappointed to find dust in the carb hose with my new filter. Thanks Joe
Quote:
Originally Posted by ER70S-2 View Post
This is mostly a repeat post on my part, for those keeping track.

I don't care for the K&N style air filters, but at least this one has some surface area compared to the dry POS that comes stock. If you're going to use one of these, at least use the lube designed for them.

I thought I'd put this in Krusty's DR650 Index, but I haven't, so I can't post a link. It's another one of those I'm going to have to finish tomorrow. I'm runnin' outta daylite.

Quickie:
For those with a memory, it was the one with Rusty Rocket's idea of using a Briggs & Stratton lawnmower filter.

The anemic little stocker is on the right (and it's swollen, I had just cleaned it in gas). It was dry and scary dusty.





How to get the stock one out to clean, oil, re-install. Put the plastic clip back in, then push the oiled Briggs in on top.




With Rusty's idea, shown here, completely neglected , there was no dust in the rubber tube. You can see where the sludge was flaking off, exposing fresh, oiled filter surface area.
Just like the original Filtron foam filter was designed to do. Oops, mighta dated myself a bit there.



More better:
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Old 05-26-2012, 07:52 AM   #64929
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Long Distance Gearing?

Month from today leaving on a 2500 mile trip, will be nearly all on-road as couple guys coming along are taking street bikes/cruisers.

I'll have my DR650 on supermoto wheels and currently running a 14/43 gearing which is real fun around town but pretty rev happy for 60mph (~4300 rpm). How would switching to 16/42 be for the trip? We don't really plan on taking freeways but mainly back roads and small highways were we will average about 50mph or so.

I'd like to keep the revs down a bit lower to help save on fuel.

Any of you guys running the 16/42?
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Old 05-26-2012, 08:14 AM   #64930
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Quote:
Originally Posted by epix1718 View Post
Month from today leaving on a 2500 mile trip, will be nearly all on-road as couple guys coming along are taking street bikes/cruisers.

I'll have my DR650 on supermoto wheels and currently running a 14/43 gearing which is real fun around town but pretty rev happy for 60mph (~4300 rpm). How would switching to 16/42 be for the trip? We don't really plan on taking freeways but mainly back roads and small highways were we will average about 50mph or so.

I'd like to keep the revs down a bit lower to help save on fuel.

Any of you guys running the 16/42?
I'm about to do a 5K run and have been running 16/42 for awhile. It works well for pavement and mild dirt roads and extends the happy zone about 10mph. 70-75mph (80mph indicated) is comfortable for me on the slab and 2 lane pavement is just as much fun as with stock gearing, it just lacks some low speed grunt.

You could leave the 43T rear if the chain is long enough, mine is two notches below "2" on the adjusters with a 12k mile chain.

Good luck.
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Old 05-26-2012, 08:28 AM   #64931
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acerbis 5.3 gal tank install

Please help! I get the impression this must be obvious because no one is discussing it. We just received an new 5.3 gal tank for the wife's DR and we're trying to install it. But I can't figure out what to do with the other line that goes over to the output side of the carb. The petcock that came with the tank only has a single connection while the stock one has two. Do I use the stock petcock?
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Old 05-26-2012, 08:32 AM   #64932
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Originally Posted by gregdee View Post
Please help! I get the impression this must be obvious because no one is discussing it. We just received an new 5.3 gal tank for the wife's DR and we're trying to install it. But I can't figure out what to do with the other line that goes over to the output side of the carb. The petcock that came with the tank only has a single connection while the stock one has two. Do I use the stock petcock?
Plug it and hide it somewhere...It's not needed unless you're using the stock vacuum operated petcock.
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Old 05-26-2012, 08:35 AM   #64933
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Plug it and hide it somewhere...It's not needed unless you're using the stock vacuum operated petcock.
So, fold it over and put a zip tie or piece of wire around it?
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Old 05-26-2012, 08:51 AM   #64934
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Originally Posted by ER70S-2 View Post
Those are stock forks. The fork gaiters should be slid up to the bottom triple.

DAMN!!! There's sum rokz.

There are also ample opportunities to make a mistake that would ruin yer whole week!!!

Rockin' good tunes, too.
As suspected, thanks for the info!
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Old 05-26-2012, 09:02 AM   #64935
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So, fold it over and put a zip tie or piece of wire around it?
I took the hose off and used a plug from the auto parts store to plug the outlet on the carb.

You could also stick a bolt in the hose and then zip tie the bolt to secure it.

Folding it over might work, but with heat and time it might create a leak where it was folded over as the rubber cracks.
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