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Old 05-28-2012, 12:10 AM   #65041
Feelers
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mambo Dave View Post
Maybe some of you have some ideas here re: fuel mileage. I'm getting seemingly progressively worse gas mileage after each fill-up lately.

This last tankful (stock tank) had me hitting reserve somewhere around 78 miles?

I only just got this bike two weeks ago or so, but even when I was REALLY pushing it, I was getting better MPG. Lately I've been trying to tone it down in RPM's for my commutes (staying under 85), being even and smooth on the throttle, until my Procycle shipment with the larger front sprocket arrives (taking seemingly forever), yet in toning it down I'm getting worse fuel economy.

It still runs as good as it originally did, so I don't think I've worn out the rings or anything. Maybe it's me trying 89 octane vs. 87, or maybe it was the switch to Shell gasoline for this last tank (not a company I generally trust after they took over 1 million vehicles out here in south Florida with sulfur contamination... of which I was affected and wasn't paid for)? Have we just now switched over to the summer formulation of fuels? That could be it I guess.

I don't know what to think.
You are getting 78 miles with 3 gallons? Are you sure it was filled up all the way, or that someone didn't reset your trip meter or something? My bike gets about 58 mpg. Yours gets around 26?!
I think it's time to take your carb apart.

By the way, you will get a bit less mileage with higher octane gasoline because higher octane gasoline actually has a lower energy density to avoid compression ignition in high compression engines (not the DR.) So, higher octane gasoline in a vehicle not designed for it is a double waste of money. You spend more money and actually get less power.
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Old 05-28-2012, 12:20 AM   #65042
Kommando
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Originally Posted by gregdee View Post
So, fold it over and put a zip tie or piece of wire around it?
Get a vacuum cap from the autoparts store. Remove the vacuum hose from the petcock to the carb. Cap the fitting on the carb.
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Old 05-28-2012, 01:18 AM   #65043
Mambo Dave
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Feelers View Post
You are getting 78 miles with 3 gallons? Are you sure it was filled up all the way, or that someone didn't reset your trip meter or something? My bike gets about 58 mpg. Yours gets around 26?!
I think it's time to take your carb apart.

By the way, you will get a bit less mileage with higher octane gasoline because higher octane gasoline actually has a lower energy density to avoid compression ignition in high compression engines (not the DR.) So, higher octane gasoline in a vehicle not designed for it is a double waste of money. You spend more money and actually get less power.
I agree with the energy density of the higher octane - I tried 89 octane twice, but this last tank was regular.

My fill-up was just a hair over 2.5 gallons. So that's 2.5 gallons to reserve from just about an inch and a half from the top of the filler neck - which is where I fill it to since I don't like it over-flowing at the gas pump. 2.5 gallons to under 80 miles... hopefully that DJ needle and jet kit will get here soon. I can take the carb apart then, but I'm really not sure what I'd be looking for with this progressively worse fuel economy.
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Old 05-28-2012, 01:20 AM   #65044
NordieBoy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adv Grifter View Post
Generally if the bead is fully and evenly seated all the way round and the tube not folded, then your tire should run smooth ... unless the wheel is bent or you have a faulty tire (which does happen).
Or if you run a rim lock.
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Old 05-28-2012, 01:26 AM   #65045
NordieBoy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beezerjuice View Post
I have a 2000 model and the lean surge bugged the hell out of me. I tried a bigger pilot jet and then the Dyno Jet kit. The bigger pilot jet did nothing and with the Dyno Jet kit, the bike ran poorly, mileage when to hell and with the airbox cover off, the bike was loud.I found the simple solution--put a .025" washer under the needle base. This raises the needle to richen the mixture at just off idle and the lean surge went away. The fuel mileage went back to 50mpg.
You could also jet the DynoJet kit correctly and get 48-50mpg.

If you use the washer, it's also best to remove the snorkel and adjust the mixture screw to suit as well.
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Old 05-28-2012, 02:06 AM   #65046
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NordieBoy View Post
You could also jet the DynoJet kit correctly and get 48-50mpg.

If you use the washer, it's also best to remove the snorkel and adjust the mixture screw to suit as well.
Yup. I did the Procycle kit and tried to follow the directions as closely as I could. I get about 50MPG and I don't baby it. My front end lofts easily enough in 1st or 2nd and it rips on up to slab speeds nicely. I notice surging when cruising at low-to-mid-range RPMs on windy days, but it starts and runs well other times. This thing is a bulldozer in 1st gear through deep sand.

I shake my head when people claim they need a pumper carb, free-flow exhaust, and 14/42 gearing to wheely or run slab 2up on these things near sea level, or that re-jetting would ruin their 48MPG. Something aint quite right with their tuning or their bike, and it may be something minor, like O-rings or float adjustment in the carb.
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Old 05-28-2012, 03:16 AM   #65047
John E
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Hmmm....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Load Clear View Post
I am waiting outside the garage door now so I will be first in line when they open on Tuesday. I am sure no one ever taught you and you learned everything on your own.

So it's got about 2 inches of play in it but sounds like it's smacking the crap out of the roller and swingarm. I was going to roll it one click to see what it feels like. <-- any advice on that?
Which wrench are you trying to use? If it's the one in the tool kit, it should be a stamped steel 24mm wrench with a flattened out piece of tubing that fits over the end to give you some extra leverage.

Can you describe what the wrench is doing a little more clearly?

I've been asking some pretty basic questions here lately too, the guys who post here regularly know their stuff, even the one who suggested you back away from the bike. He may have given you a bit of grief but he knows an awful lot about the DR, give him another chance, I'm sure he'll mellow out a bit...;^)
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Old 05-28-2012, 03:29 AM   #65048
ADV8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Load Clear View Post
Ok, First - I am a tool tool. Even so, adjusting the chain tension on my 2012 seems like something I can handle. The high quality Suzuki wrench and pipe for leverage is not breaking the locking nut. Only cutting into the nut (and popping mine...)

I have tried a few searches but cannot find a socket size for the nut (none I have fit). Any help and advice would be welcome.

Thanks - LC
Go buy a cheap 24 mm and 19 mm ring spanners and cut the open ends off.
That will suit both the front and rear axle hexs and will save the drama of the cheesy crap in the stock tool kit.
You can weld the two back together to make a double ended tool as an option.
The chain adjusting procedure is a little funky as it is,it says to check it on the side stand (for a reliable and fixed base point) but it does not hurt to load the rear up and check it has no tight spot just after the swing arm passes horizontal.
If the chain is even a little tight at that point in the arc it will give the output bearing a hard time.

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Old 05-28-2012, 06:34 AM   #65049
bradrh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adv Grifter View Post
Glad to see some real experience on this. Balancing on dual sports always is debated. But it was settled for me several years ago by my friend Peter.

Peter rides an XR650R ... and a few other bikes. His day job is working on the Yosh Suzuki team for Blake Young and Martin Cardenas (both AMA Super bike guys). Peter's been at this about 15 years. His job on the crew? Suspension, wheels and tires. (among other things) Peter said his XR650R ... nor any of this other dirt or dual sport bikes ... benefit from balancing the tires. He said if speeds got up over 120 mph, you MIGHT need balancing. I've done both road and dirt rides with Peter for 10's of thousands of miles all through California, Nevada and Mexico.
...
I have a balancer rig and I use it on my 1050 Tiger and other street bikes. But I've never balanced tires on dual sport bikes I've owned. (XL, KLR, KTM, DR (3) ) No issues.
With rim locks?
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Old 05-28-2012, 06:41 AM   #65050
greener556
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kommando View Post
As recommended before, start with the basic toolkit that comes with the DR. Upgrade this basic kit as you can, but these tools DO work if you need them.

The first thing I'd add is an AMA or AAA membership with roadside assistance. If you get AAA, read the fine print about motos and what kind of service they give you. AMA is like $39/yr, and they support motorcyclists. Their roadside service covers any vehicle you own, even RVs and trailers. AAA is a bit more, but you might get discounts for things like hotels and restaurants. I believe AAA charges more to add things like motos, RVs, and trailers to the coverage.

Then I'd add a flat-repair kit. I carry spare front and rear NATURAL-rubber (patchable) tubes, 2 MotionPro combo tire levers (24mm wrench and 12/13mm wrench), a patch kit, pressure gauge, and a mtn bike pump. I also carry an EnduroStar trailstand, a BeadBuddyII, and a 12V inflator, but these are more luxuries than necessities for fixing a flat. Many people also recommend at least 3 tire levers. I've not really needed a 3rd, or a bead breaker, but most people do. I also carry a piece of rope stout enough to pull the bike with. 15ft is enough to tow carefully with, wrapped and stomped on right peg of towing bike to left peg of towed bike. Un-stomp if you need to get loose in a hurry.

A multi-meter, JB QuikWeld or QuikSteel, electrical tape stored wrapped around some tools, a few feet of 12-14AWG stranded electrical wire, a spare masterlink or two, a small chain-breaker tool, various sizes of zip-ties, a roll of duct tape, WD40 or similar, a fluid transfer pump or length of fuel hose for siphoning, and some baling wire might be handy too. I also carry a Leatherman multi-tool (needle-nose pliers, wire cutters/strippers, philips, flat, knives, awl, corkscrew, margarita blender, etc.).

I can carry all this in a Moose dualsport front fenderpack and a set of ATV Logic tank panniers, neither of which is very expensive. Drill the fender and zip-tie or bolt a fenderpack to the fender, if you're going to use one. They have a tendency to fall off and get lost if you don't.

Thinking about taking my first long trip with my DR650 as well. My biggest worry is a flat rear tire. I've got a Supermoto rear tire on my DR650, I'm worried the sidewall is too small and changing it's gonna be impossible. Any suggestions?? Should I look for a used rear wheel set-up?
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Old 05-28-2012, 07:03 AM   #65051
Kommando
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greener556 View Post
Thinking about taking my first long trip with my DR650 as well. My biggest worry is a flat rear tire. I've got a Supermoto rear tire on my DR650, I'm worried the sidewall is too small and changing it's gonna be impossible. Any suggestions?? Should I look for a used rear wheel set-up?
I've never changed an SM tire, so I couldn't tell you if you should find a different setup for your trip or not. The best way to find out if you can do it is to actually do it. Use just the tools/supplies/equipment you'll be taking with you. If you have to add tools, you'll want to carry these added tools. If you have to use talcum/baby powder or lube, you'll want to be able to use these as well.

If it was me, I'd find the most economical tire that will safely do the trip at a fun pace. This isn't necessarily the cheapest tire, but the one that gives the best bang for the buck. For example, I have a $20 knobby on the front of my DR right now, but it wouldn't make a long pavement trip without disintegrating. I wouldn't spend $150 on a touring tire that would make a long pavement trip either, because I can get pretty good mileage on a safe and fun dualsport tire that will make it for $60. Your riding may lean towards a more-expensive tire for better cornering.

What kind of riding will this trip be?
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Old 05-28-2012, 07:14 AM   #65052
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I finally uploaded some videos to Youtube. This is my first trail video, showing some of the sandy dirt roads and wider quad trails to explore in Spacecoast Florida.


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Old 05-28-2012, 07:41 AM   #65053
sagedrifter
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The most important thing about your tools on the bike, is to use them at home first. That will let you know real quick what works. My tool kit has very little oem stuff left. I carry cheap Autozone end wrenches for the axles so I don't struggle. Having good strong tools saves lots of hassle.

When changing tires, use the tools on the bike only for good practice. Don't do the shop thing, they won't be there 2000 miles from home in some hot dusty desert etc.

I hate fighting with little irons, I keep two of the big MP and one 15" tire irons in my left saddle bag all the time. I don't bother with tire loob. Some water/dish soap from my camping kit works if needed.

It takes practice to change tires, its all about small bites and not trying to force it. After years of breaking beads its now easy for me to just use irons. I leave the bead breakers at home now.

If your going to ride a tube tire bike far, you will be better off learning to do your own tire work. Plus you save a huge amount of time and money after a while.

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Old 05-28-2012, 08:06 AM   #65054
doug s.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kommando View Post
Yup. I did the Procycle kit and tried to follow the directions as closely as I could. I get about 50MPG and I don't baby it. My front end lofts easily enough in 1st or 2nd and it rips on up to slab speeds nicely. I notice surging when cruising at low-to-mid-range RPMs on windy days, but it starts and runs well other times. This thing is a bulldozer in 1st gear through deep sand.

I shake my head when people claim they need a pumper carb, free-flow exhaust, and 14/42 gearing to wheely or run slab 2up on these things near sea level, or that re-jetting would ruin their 48MPG. Something aint quite right with their tuning or their bike, and it may be something minor, like O-rings or float adjustment in the carb.
it is not that the dr650 cannot be made to run well w/the stock carb. as you and many others can attest. it's yust that it will run so much better, w/a pumper carb. as everyone who has ever gone from a properly sorted modded stock carb to a pumper will tell you. everyone.

if you ever go to a pumper carb, (and free-flow exhaust), you will shake your head and wonder why you waited so long to do so. then, you will really understand what "rips on up to slab speeds" and "this thing is a bulldozer in 1st gear through deep sand" means. of course, i am sure the same thing can be said to me by those who have installed the 790 kit w/big walves, on their bikes... but, the cost difference is also a bit different - if you buy new and sell your stock carb, it will cost you ~$350; if you buy used, you can do it for $100-$200. the 790 kit costs a tad more...

doug s.
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Old 05-28-2012, 08:41 AM   #65055
SingleTrackJeff
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Lowered foot pegs

I haven't posted on this page in a while but I just made some lowered food peg perches after ridding with the lowering plates that a lot of ff's like but the make log crossing kinda hard. I bought another set from ebay and started cutting.
I weighed the before and after and the difference was a loss of about 6 grams per side mostly from using a shorter bolt.
I ride 45 miles of fire roads and single track yesterday and the new pegs worked great, no deflecting at all.







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