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Old 06-19-2012, 02:04 PM   #66121
Mongle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by procycle View Post
15 minutes of cooling behind a dyno fan will have the DR650 stone cold. If the dyno operator does not have some kind of temperature sensor I would get one of those laser thermometers and make sure the cylinder head was up to 200-250 degrees before starting any dyno pull.


[/CENTER]
I agree with Procycle.

When we dyno our motors (V8 stuff) we make sure the engine is up to running temp BEFORE any type of pull. If the motor happens to cool down between pulls we go throught the warm up process again. We use warm up time to check things like: oil pressures, timing, fuel #s etc. so when it comes time to pull the trigger we are ready. We keep the motors in the 1500-2500 rpm range during initial warm up. Don't let it lug around on idle. Most of our engines idle in the 600-800 range so with a DR that idles at 1500 I would keep the bike in the 2000-2500 range on initial warm up.

We don't work our way up on pull % once the motor is warm. If it is acting right and the fuel numbers are right we pull 100% on the first pull. Knock on wood- 20yrs dynoing motors and we haven't had a problem yet.
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Old 06-19-2012, 02:07 PM   #66122
johnkol
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowy View Post
It takes a lot of work to even try to pass a DR off as a "trail Bike". But , yeah, you can ride trails on a standard one. It just isn't a great deal of fun, more like hard work.
That's precisely what I'm concluding -- and what I would like to avoid. I never had any delusions of the DR matching my 2T KTM; I was merely expecting to be able to cruise along fire roads at reduced speeds, but in relative comfort and tranquility. If I cannot relax in navigating these roads then there is no reason for me to carry on down this path: I might as well go back to trucking the KTM, or start shopping for a more dirt-oriented bike.
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Old 06-19-2012, 02:13 PM   #66123
TRAVELGUY
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Yes! +1

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr DR650 (2011) View Post
Really truly?? - I've been diligently idling my bike every morning believing this was the right process. But now you've explained it like this, it makes sense.

Does anyone else follow this line of thinking..............getting on your bike whilst cold and riding gently until warm??

Just curious/confused
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Old 06-19-2012, 02:16 PM   #66124
Rob_NJ
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92 or 98

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bronco638 View Post
Go with the '98. That's a good deal, especially for $2200. The '92 is a previous iteration of the DR650 and parts availability may be an issue. It's also heavier than the newer version.
Thanks Bronco - I am kinda more inclined to go that route just wondering what the thought were on the starter idler gear. If I start adding up the numbers it looks something like this:

92 = $1,300
repack the muffler, screw around with the carb and jetting, replace the worn out knobbies with a decent set of 80/20 tires, replace the signals, add a mirror and I am probably close to $1,800 - if I have to replace the pipe $2,000

98 for $2,200 and I add a $200 gear from kleintech (may not need to do it right away) and have a 6 year newer bike with half the miles and I get a bonus magic starter button and don't have to worry about kicking my brains out every morning (or when I stall at a light).

Plan on using mostly as a commuter but have a bunch of land in upstate PA that I would like to ride and also ride to (180 mile one way trip half highway, half two lane back roads).
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Old 06-19-2012, 02:24 PM   #66125
freestate
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Don't know if anyone have an answer for this but here we go.
I've found a cheap nearly unused Öhlins front fork with crowns and all for a Honda CRF 150.
Would that be functional on a DR or is it to weak for the DR's weight?
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Old 06-19-2012, 02:31 PM   #66126
JagLite
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Thumb Pre 96 or newer choice

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob_NJ View Post
92 = $1,300
repack the muffler, screw around with the carb and jetting, replace the worn out knobbies with a decent set of 80/20 tires, replace the signals, add a mirror and I am probably close to $1,800 - if I have to replace the pipe $2,000

98 for $2,200 and I add a $200 gear from kleintech (may not need to do it right away) and have a 6 year newer bike with half the miles and I get a bonus magic starter button and don't have to worry about kicking my brains out every morning (or when I stall at a light).

Plan on using mostly as a commuter but have a bunch of land in upstate PA that I would like to ride and also ride to (180 mile one way trip half highway, half two lane back roads).
Without a doubt I vote for the 98.
I have found parts are not easy to come by for my pre-96, it weighs a ton, kick starting is easy if it is willing to start but if there is a problem it gets old real fast.
There are those who really like the early DR's but I am not one.
Check the pre 96 DR650 thread here in ADV and post the same question there if you have not already.

I bought an 02 and it is so much better in every aspect. So much in fact that I now have two of them.
Everything on the '96 up to current is compatible, parts are available everywhere and are reasonably priced.
The suspension, such as it is, is better too and easy to improve.
The magic button is wonderful and the modifying options are unlimited.
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Old 06-19-2012, 04:48 PM   #66127
doug s.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr DR650 (2011) View Post
Really truly?? - I've been diligently idling my bike every morning believing this was the right process. But now you've explained it like this, it makes sense.

Does anyone else follow this line of thinking..............getting on your bike whilst cold and riding gently until warm??

Just curious/confused
i have followed this procedure - start driving/riding immediately - w/every wehicle i have ever owned, since 1974. that's when i read in the owners' manual of the the 2nd car i owned - a 1968 wolvo 144 - that the best way to warm up the car was to start driving immediately, but be gentle. as discussed prewiously, it is because the most wear occurs during warm-up, and gentle driving will warm up the wehicle faster than anything else, w/o putting undue stress or wear on anything...

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Old 06-19-2012, 04:48 PM   #66128
johnkol
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JagLite View Post
That is very interesting. When I bought my '02 it had 2,500 miles on it and was completely stock, in excellent condition. The front forks sagged so much just from the bike weight that I had to be careful where I parked it so that it wouldn't fall over. Once I sat on it, the sag was more than half the total travel and would easily bottom out under braking on the pavement.
With 22mm spacers in the forks (stock are 40mm) my race sag is 70mm (2.75"), whereas ideally it should be around 85mm (3.3"); stock springs, but I only weigh 130 lbs.

Oddly enough, the forks were not that objectionable -- but maybe that was because the rear was mis-behaving so badly that the front's behaviour paled in comparison.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JagLite View Post
The rear sag I could set correctly, but as with your bike, the rear wheel spent more time off the ground than on it in any bumps. Trying to go up a dirt road that had the common stutter bumps from all the car traffic was no fun as the tire would not get traction.
That's precisely what was happening to the rear wheel! How come this is the first time I'm reading this? Was I selectively reading glowing reviews all this time?

I suspect a bit of too much preload on the rear does not help (I set it to match the front, which means it's not as soft as it should be), but the primary culprit is too much compression damping and almost no rebound damping. Unfortunately, compression damping is set at just 4 turns from full soft, and setting it at zero or 2 turns made the bike wallow on longer wavelength bumps on the road. And of course rebound damping is not adjustable -- what an inspired choice Suzuki made!

The conclusion is that there's not much I can do with the shock as it is right now; the only solution is to either get a new one or rebuilt the stock, but this is not cheap as you attest -- which means that one needs to commit to the bike first, and I'm not at that point yet.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JagLite View Post
What I would like to suggest is that you post here, there, and everywhere to arrange to go riding with OTHER DR650's and trade bikes.
I would be happy to do the ride with you but I am a leeeeeeettle too far away to make that work.
The problem with riding other people's bikes is the improbability of finding one set up for my own weight and dimensions: I'm only 130 lbs, and I prefer very low bars; my impression is that most riders (actually, most people in general) weigh quite a bit more than I do, and seem to prefer high bars.

Too far away?? Why, it's only 2700 miles! Isn't the DR an adventure bike after all?
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Old 06-19-2012, 04:57 PM   #66129
doug s.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob_NJ View Post
Thanks for the responses to my last post. Lots of good info on the thread suggested.

Here's the question

I have two DR650s available locally.

1992 with around 20,000 miles that I can get for $1,300. Problems that I see are exhaust is LOUD - sounds like half a harley. Turn signals were switched to LED and either do not function or all flash - plan to replace to standard or put in the diode. Kick start only may be an issue although it did start on second kick from cold using the decomp lever.
That one is here http://cnj.craigslist.org/mcy/3015587913.html

or

1998 with 10,000 miles - spoke to owner and he is second owner had the bike for a year and to his knowledge it is totally as-built except for newer tires - no knowledge that the solid idler gear was ever replaced.

asking $2,600 will go to $2,200.

That is here

Any thoughts on prices, in line or outrageous.

Other considerations are parts availability of 92 versus 98, will parts from anything up to new fit on the 98?

Your help and expertise is greatly appreciated
i would buy neither, and buy this instead - even if you have to pay shipping, it's a great deal, imo:

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=796934

personally, i cannot understand why this is still f/s...

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Old 06-19-2012, 05:00 PM   #66130
thumpididump
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taikimoto View Post
Need some quick tire suggestions to look at.

I will mainly use it as a commuter with maybe 1 day a week doing fire road excursions.

So Im thinking some type of 80/20 or maybe even a 90/10? Stock wheels. I have Kenda K270 50/50's on another bike and like them, but want something a bit more road worthy on the DR.

I local shop guy suggested the tires that come on the new KLR 650's as they are the same size, and even mentioned the stock trailwings might be ok for what I want (I have full DOT knobbies on now and they arent very good on the pavement).
Quote:
Originally Posted by AST236 View Post
I'm running Michelin Anakee 2's on my DR and have also had good success w/ Pirelli Scorpions. Great tires for what you are describing.


Anakees and Scorpions are both great tires for doing mostly asphalt duty, but if you want to save some coin, then look at the Shinko 705. A very good tire that will last for many miles, and very good in the rain. They'll handle light gravel roads, too.
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Old 06-19-2012, 05:06 PM   #66131
doug s.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minsk99 View Post
Just to update, I just got a new 2012 last night (although still at dealer). Can't freaking wait to get on the saddle!!! Anyways, I am having the dealer truck the bike to a dyno end of this week without ever having been fired up and am going to do the "hard break in" there on the dyno. As of now, I am going to do the motoman method as he describes it on his web site, which is as follows:

On a Dyno: Warm the engine up
completely !!

Then, using 4th gear:

Do Three 1/2 Throttle dyno runs from
40% - 60% of your engine's max rpm

Let it Cool Down For About 15 Minutes

Do Three 3/4 Throttle dyno runs from
40% - 80%
of your engine's max rpm
Let it Cool Down For About 15 Minutes


Do Three Full Throttle dyno runs from
30% - 100% of your engine's max rpm

Let it Cool Down For About 15 Minutes
Go For It !!



Interested in what folks think of this exact process or if it should perhaps be modified for the DR. I'll let ya know how it goes. Also, not to start a riot, but what are the feelings about auto vs. motorcycle oil for this type of break in procedure? I anticipate changing the oil immediately after the dyno break in. Thanks.
years ago, i was the purchasing/materials mgr for callaway adwanced technology, (anyone remember the callaway corwette?), when they had the contract to build racing engines for aston martin's group-c (lemans series) racing cars. aston would ship us raw block castings, and we would ship them back complete, broken-in engines. while our break in procedure was not identical to the motoman method, they were similar - seweral dyno runs building up to full redline. altho, as has been mentioned above, the "cool down" did not inwolve a complete 15 minute cool down, but simply enough rest to allow the engine to go back to temps it would see at idle...

the corwettes were broken-in in a similar fashion, after we had rebuilt them and installed twin-turbos....

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Old 06-19-2012, 05:24 PM   #66132
epix1718
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Anyone have the IMS tank? I bought a used one with no hardware.. does it use the 2 stock fuel tank mounting bolt to attach to the frame?
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Old 06-19-2012, 05:37 PM   #66133
243Win
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Quote:
Originally Posted by epix1718 View Post
Anyone have the IMS tank? I bought a used one with no hardware.. does it use the 2 stock fuel tank mounting bolt to attach to the frame?
Yes and the rubber bumpers on them too.
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Old 06-19-2012, 06:18 PM   #66134
Emmbeedee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 243Win View Post
Yes and the rubber bumpers on them too.
But not the same rubbers and bolts as the stock tank, at least not in my case. They are rubber bumpers which fit only on top of the rear tank mounts.
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Old 06-19-2012, 07:14 PM   #66135
kobukan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by epix1718 View Post
Anyone have the IMS tank? I bought a used one with no hardware.. does it use the 2 stock fuel tank mounting bolt to attach to the frame?
Mine does not use the stock mounts. It came with different rubber mounts and bolts.
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