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Old 06-22-2012, 04:41 PM   #66256
BergDonk
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Location: Snowy Mountains Oz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bundy bruiser View Post
I already have lowering plates for the standard pegs, I saw the pro cycle ones.
I dont like the pivot pegs, any other ideas?
I use the Fastways on my DR and Berg. Useful ability to set them up high or low, and can be adjusted for 'camber' too. Nice pegs. Can get them here in Oz from Ballards.

Steve
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Old 06-22-2012, 05:11 PM   #66257
johnkol
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GaThumper View Post
Sorry for the late reply, been busy this week and just catching up.
Wow, GaThumper, that was a long note, filled with great information; I know it must have taken you considerable time and effort, so thank you for this, I really appreciate it!

I really enjoy the DR on twisty roads: the power is fine, the suspension behaves reasonably well (as long as there are no stutter bumps), and the tyres are predictable and stick quite well. What I don't enjoy with the DR is droning on flat, straight roads, and unfortunately for me, I have to be on such roads for more than 2 hours before I reach the curvy bits.

The stock seat is fine, I have spent 9 hours on it without any problems -- I could easily do multiple such days with no issues. Having said that, the narrower seat on my KTM is more enjoyable, so this is an additional advantage the EXC potentially has over the DR.

I agree, the right bike makes you feel like a hero. But more than that, it allows you to develop into a better rider. Trying to subdue an unruly bike is not my idea of fun, and not the way to acquire more skills. Once I experienced how big a role the bike plays, I became very uninterested in riding any motorcycle that did not click with me.

I looked at the Huskies you mention, but apart from the 610/630, they all come with very close-ratio transmissions, which severely limits their functionality on the road. As far as I can tell, the EXCs are the only bikes with a wide-ratio box appropriate for highway droning.

I also looked at the latest 250 offerings, and I was ambivalent about their horsepower, particularly for highway use. But you do have a point, that most of the comments about these bikes come from people that are a lot heavier than I am, and for people of my weight a 250 would be adequate.

Which brings me to another problem with the DR that I just realised: I have been setting sag using the well-known guidelines of 30%-35% of overall suspension travel, but these rules are for straight-rate (linear) springs, not progressive ones like on the DR. I presume for progressive springs the sag should be more, but I don't know how much more. Whatever it is though, I already cannot achieve the recommended sag values: at the lowest fork preload the race sag is only 70mm -- and I don't think that anyone makes a linear spring softer than the stock one.

One thing is certain: there's a lot of DR experimentation in my future.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GaThumper View Post
Oh, one more observation for you. I HATE the DR650 on loose gravel.
Yes, loose gravel is what I encountered. I have been on similar roads for all my riding life and I never had a problem with them, but with the DR and the 705s it was an experience that I do not want to repeat -- the slides were not the controlled kind.

Thanks again!
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Old 06-22-2012, 05:22 PM   #66258
N.dica
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TM40 resolution

Well the guys at Procycle have repaired my carb and it arrived today. I want to say thank you to them and I appreciate the fast turnaround. I think in all it took only a week for me to send it to them, for them to fix it, and then to receive it back. Sweet. Cheers fellas!

Now naturally I reinstalled it today and hit the road. THAT is what I was expecting to feel from this carb. I definitely wasn't getting a clear picture before. My engine temperatures are down, the jetting is perfect, minimal popping on decel, and wicked throttle response. As stated previously, my old carb was dialed in, and whereas I couldn't tell much difference between the BST and the TM40 before, now that the TM40 has the vacuum leak sorted I absolutely notice the difference. The responsiveness and smoothness is striking. Funny how such a small vacuum leak can throw the whole thing out of whack. Anyway Im stoked.

Still doing the big bore, but it is put off one more week as I just received my X40F0X from an Englishman over Ebay. I swear the thing is immaculate- it looks like it was never even used once. So between that and the jesse adapter kit I just ordered, the 790 will have to wait just a bit longer.

With all the money I have dumped into my bike there could easily be the argument made that I could have bought a KTM or whatever..... But Im happy I went this route. My DR kills it on the tarmac, and Ive taken her on some flat-out gnarly trails and shes devoured them. With the right mods, the performance offroad is superb, especially considering shes like a bat out of hell on the pavement as well. Shes completely customed out to my taste, and I could for the most part tear her apart and fix anything thats wrong myself. I like being able to depend on myself as mechanic when lost in the wilderness. Gives you a great deal of confidence. And above all, its just plain fun to tinker away in the garage. A great, albeit addictive and expensive hobby.

Cheers all, and thanks again to Drum, Carl, and all the guys at Procycle for being so damned professional:)
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Old 06-22-2012, 05:46 PM   #66259
rutsthematter
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Location: Drouin, Gippsland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bundy bruiser View Post
I already have lowering plates for the standard pegs, I saw the pro cycle ones.
I dont like the pivot pegs, any other ideas?

If you look in the Ballards catalogue (Page 41) they have footpeg wideners that you can weld on. I have some coming to try.
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Old 06-22-2012, 05:49 PM   #66260
kobukan
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Looks like this might be a decent deal on a Safari tank if anyone's looking for one.
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Old 06-22-2012, 05:50 PM   #66261
GaThumper
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Location: Thumpin' in North GA - headin' for the Smokys
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnkol View Post

What I don't enjoy with the DR is droning on flat, straight roads, and unfortunately for me, I have to be on such roads for more than 2 hours before I reach the curvy bits.
I haven't found a bike yet that I enjoy long straight roads on. The closest I come to enjoying them is on my Yamaha 1300cc V4 Venture with electronic cruise control, stereo, and full fairing! Around here I realize we are blessed with lot's of great motorcycle roads and the ability to avoid most interstates and other long straight drones with a little route planning.

As far as the dual sports, I can't imagine ANY of them being fun on long boring stretches of asphalt.

It's sounding like maybe a KTM 450exc would be a good bike for you to try, Maybe you could find someone locally to try one out and see. And I wonder how the new Yamaha WR250R might work for you? Seems to be a really popular new entry, but it weighs as much (or more( than the KTM!

Here's an early test I was just looking at. Of course, there are some good threads here to look at, too.

http://www.off-road.com/dirtbike/rev...50r-23644.html

Good Luck with your quest, and remember, enjoy the journey!

P.S. Not due 'till 2013, but check out the KTM Freeride 350. About 220 pounds and Very Interesting!
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GaThumper screwed with this post 06-22-2012 at 05:58 PM
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Old 06-22-2012, 07:02 PM   #66262
NorCal Jeff
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Joined: Apr 2007
Location: Scott Valley Northern Cal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GaThumper View Post
I called and talked ot the tech at NGK and he recommended upgrading to the iridium, but not using the dual electrode. I honestly can't remember why he said not to use them, but at the time he convinced me!
I installed the Iridiums..makes a big difference in the butt dyno..I recommend them..
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Old 06-22-2012, 07:09 PM   #66263
bundy bruiser
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footpegs

Thanks for all the replies regarding bigger footpegs.
Thanks for that link Cemony, I went with a set of those
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Old 06-22-2012, 07:35 PM   #66264
Lil' Steve
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Location: Da Bronx, NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ADV8 View Post
What stops the engine turning ?
That is a clutch basket to hub locking tool,you still need a arm off that to rest on the crank shaft snout to stop the clutch turning... fwiw.

These were old plates though with the socket accessible through the hole in the plate.

http://i30.photobucket.com/albums/c3...lutch/CLT8.jpg

Place the trans in gear, use breaker bar or impact wrench on the nut.
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Old 06-22-2012, 07:39 PM   #66265
Jon_PDX
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Joined: Feb 2007
Location: Clackamas, OR - USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by N.dica View Post
Well the guys at Procycle have repaired my carb and it arrived today. I want to say thank you to them and I appreciate the fast turnaround. I think in all it took only a week for me to send it to them, for them to fix it, and then to receive it back. Sweet. Cheers fellas!

Now naturally I reinstalled it today and hit the road. THAT is what I was expecting to feel from this carb. I definitely wasn't getting a clear picture before. My engine temperatures are down, the jetting is perfect, minimal popping on decel, and wicked throttle response. As stated previously, my old carb was dialed in, and whereas I couldn't tell much difference between the BST and the TM40 before, now that the TM40 has the vacuum leak sorted I absolutely notice the difference. The responsiveness and smoothness is striking. Funny how such a small vacuum leak can throw the whole thing out of whack. Anyway Im stoked.

.......snip rest..........

Cheers all, and thanks again to Drum, Carl, and all the guys at Procycle for being so damned professional:)
That's great news.....thanks for posting the followup.

Jon...
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Old 06-22-2012, 08:09 PM   #66266
ADV8
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Location: North of Sydney.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vfr870 View Post
Place the trans in gear, use breaker bar or impact wrench on the nut.
What was the point of bolting old clutch plates together then.
The whole point of locking the clutch hub is to avoid doing that to the transmission and making it easy to remove and refit/torque the nut.
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Old 06-22-2012, 08:56 PM   #66267
Snowy
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If you have problems with the DR on fast deep gravel sweepers try this:

As you are braking to enter the turn, start trailing the front brake with one finger, enough to make the front squat a little on the springs, keep throttle held on as you do it so you don't actually bleed any speed, pick your line and turn while trailing the front very gently.

I find in deep loose gravel it helps make the front bite down into the gravel and that stops it wanting to understeer. The rear is pushing against a slight load, so it tends to not skate so much and gets better hook up and resists oversteer.

Use the wheel ruts that already exist. I quite often over shoot a loose corner and use the high dirt gutter ( if there is one) on the outside as a berm. Crossing from rut to rut with a high deep gravel center is fun. Ride it like sand, weight up, very slightly rear and grip with the knees, steer with the knees and hips.

I learned this while running D952 front and Mitas E09 rear, and can adapt it to any combo now.

Some dual sports tyres don't like it because they just don't have the knob depth and separation to bite down into the gravel, they just start to skate.

So right tyres for gravel is the first step.

Practice gently gently to start with. You aren't talking significant braking force, just one finger and enough pressure initially that you can feel the front starting to squat.

You have to have a very fine touch, but you will feel the difference. It stabilises the front end and helps to prevent sudden break away on the rear. A rear tyre like the E09 drives and brakes well in gravel but it skates sideways under very little load. So by loading it slightly in the drive direction it settles the sideways skate. A lot of MX tyres work similar. They skate sideways if you enter a corner under too little throttle. But enter the corner and drive it as hard as you can and they propel you forward. Come in under no throttle, or just an elevated idle and the back and is out from under you. They are designed to dig and drive, under no load they slide along the surface.

With the DR you are riding essentially a very big heavy trail bike. It has that classic trail bike geometry, and a lot of weight pushing it. So you have to start using the sort of techniques the pros use on smaller bikes just to get it to do the basics well.

But it will do it.

I've chased Bergdonk through the trees and he does it, I think, without knowing he's doing it. As most old timers like us will. You go through an evolutionary thing when you've grown up with the first dirt bikes and evolved alongside them. The DR is a case of de-evolution to an extent. Modern dirtbikes have been designed and built to NOT have the character traits the DR has. But they are designed for a completely different task, and then used out of context by the majority. They are modern single track race bikes. Part trials bike, part motoX, part scrambler.

The old timers that love and cherish the DR grew up with these traits. It's a part of us. Sometimes it's hard to understand why Suzuki doesn't bring it into the modern dirt bike age, and then you look at the base demographic and it's primarily guys who grew with bikes just like the DR in terms of off road handling. To us, it just "is". It makes sense despite the inadequacies.

It may be a 25 year old design, but it represents what a dirt bike used to represent..."do it all" freedom.

Master the DR and you will truly be free...for as long as that little bullet proof 649cc heart beats. Cherish her. You'll miss her when she's gone.
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Old 06-22-2012, 08:59 PM   #66268
doug s.
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re: TM40 resolution

Quote:
Originally Posted by N.dica View Post
Well the guys at Procycle have repaired my carb and it arrived today. I want to say thank you to them and I appreciate the fast turnaround. I think in all it took only a week for me to send it to them, for them to fix it, and then to receive it back. Sweet. Cheers fellas!

Now naturally I reinstalled it today and hit the road. THAT is what I was expecting to feel from this carb. I definitely wasn't getting a clear picture before. My engine temperatures are down, the jetting is perfect, minimal popping on decel, and wicked throttle response. As stated previously, my old carb was dialed in, and whereas I couldn't tell much difference between the BST and the TM40 before, now that the TM40 has the vacuum leak sorted I absolutely notice the difference. The responsiveness and smoothness is striking. Funny how such a small vacuum leak can throw the whole thing out of whack. Anyway I'm stoked....
once again, someone w/a properly sorted stock carb is delighted w/the improvement made when upgrading to a pumper carb. again, i am not sure why folks mess w/"upgrading" the stock carb. but, if anyone still wants a stock carb that's been properly sorted for an open airbox and aftermarket muffler, make me an offer - i have one gathering dust. how's that for marketing?

doug s.
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Old 06-22-2012, 09:17 PM   #66269
Snowy
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After my "highly controversial" carb mods to the standard carb, I have ridden TM40 equipped DRs and been unimpressed. Yes they went a little harder, not much, but by God they drank a lot more fuel.

I have had guys with TM40s ride mine and they say there is very little difference. The TM40 is better....but...

Would I shell around $400 for one to replace what I have?

No. Not a chance.

If someone "gave" me one would I use it....probably not. Not unless it was for competition. Where I'm riding the engine doesn't get enough of a workout to justify it. The modified standard copes fine.



It's like the difference in acceleration between a 450 and the DR. I have guys telling me that their 450 goes heaps harder.

That's nice. So happy for them.

But out for a trail ride and they struggle to keep up.

Suspension. There's the key in rough terrain.

On the tar....yeah sure, knock yourselves out, I have a 120hp 600 sports bike for that. Or my 800 BMW. Or my other DR, which I WOULD put a TM40 on.

Horses for courses. You don't necessarily "need" the TM40. Look at the pros and cons first.
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Old 06-22-2012, 09:53 PM   #66270
doug s.
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most folks who go to pumper carbs report fuel mileage changes from a couple mpg worse to a couple mpg better. and snowy, you are the first i have heard who would rather not do it even if it were not an extra cost; especially for the dirt, due to better response and better smoothness...

re: pros-n-cons - not a lot of money for a pumper, if you shop used. (i have ~$175 into mine, and i haven't sold my upgraded stock carb yet.) and similar fuel mileage if properly set up. and all around better performance in any condition. i see zero cons going to a pumper.

doug s.
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