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Old 07-10-2012, 08:03 PM   #66976
Kommando
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Joined: Nov 2006
Location: Spacecoaster FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neo1piv014 View Post
So the knobby front makes a noticeable difference in offroad steering even without the rear tire being up to spec?
Oh HELL yes!

Maybe it's not as big a difference in some types of terrain, but in mud and bottomless sugarsand like we have around here, an appropriate front knob makes a HUGE difference. This, while a street-biased rear tire means that I can ride more than a weekend without having to spoon on a new rear knobby. My DR was almost uncontrollable in sand on the stock front TW with my noob dirt-piloting skills. The day I spooned on a front knob, sand got MUCH easier on this bike. I don't even bother airing down most of the time now.

I wouldn't recommend going as aggressive with the front tire on a mile-eating dualsport as I did (AMS Sand Snake MX...'Almost makes a D606 look like a touring tire ), as it's really squirrely when new and I don't trust it for hard braking or hard turning on pavement. An MT21 front is aggressive enough in the sand, yet still seems to grip decently and can last 2K+ miles on pavement. The Sand Snake only cost $21 though, and an MT21 is...a bit more. I'm going to try a compromise in the $28 Shinko 244 (more stable onroad than Kenda K270, but more dirty than Kenda K761 or stock TW).

I find that the front tire works best for me, in soft stuff, when it can knife in the direction I point it, like a pizza-cutter or an ice-skate (MAJOR lateral traction), while having enough braking traction to safely clamp on the front binders. In a turn or stop on soft terrain, a mild front tire can wash out very easily. If the back slides sideways, it's not usually as difficult to recover. I don't need nearly as much lateral traction in back. I need DRIVE and braking traction back there. This is likely why serious rear sand or mud tires often have paddles or paddle-type lugs on them, but some may not even have ANY type of lateral stabilizers on them. In many cases, a street-biased tread that can drive the bike forward and adequately slow the bike is all that is really needed in the rear for soft terrain. I just try to find an inexpensive tire with "paddles" that will last a long time and feel decent on pavement. The Kenda K761 fills this role well for me. It's not the greatest for lateral traction offroad, but it'll drive the DR through some nasty sand and mud if I just stay on the gas. It also handles decently onroad, while lasting much longer than any knobby I've ever heard of. My current K761 rear has 6K miles on it, a lot of which is 2up, and I've started experimenting on it with a grooving iron to make it more dirt-capable. It seems a similar pattern to the vaunted Heidenau K60 rear, but perhaps has slightly-smaller voids...and a much smaller pricetag in the US.
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Old 07-10-2012, 08:16 PM   #66977
Kommando
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Location: Spacecoaster FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by advriderwannabe View Post
I updated my profile guys.. im in fairfax, va about 22 miles or so from the white house. Although the area i live in is pretty congested, there are some nice country roads nearby, skyline drive and some major national parks that have riding trails as well....

The thing with the exhaust/smoke concerns me.
It shouldn't. It's merely a good justification to the significant other that you need to get a 790cc big-bore kit and a big-valve head.



Seriously though...With that low of mileage and all the sitting, your biggest issue is likely to be cleaning out the fuel system (carb, filters, tank, etc.). The aftermarket for this '96-present bike can make a lot of possible issues go away pretty easily, and even somewhat inexpensively, compared to many other bikes that are only around for 2-3 years before being changed/eliminated.

Just look for signs of the seller having disconnected the odo cable for several thousand miles, then replacing the plastics right before placing the ad.
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Old 07-10-2012, 09:42 PM   #66978
Ride-til-sore!
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Location: Minn-sota
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Quote:
Originally Posted by advriderwannabe View Post
I updated my profile guys.. im in fairfax, va about 22 miles or so from the white house. .
Um, I think someone wanted you to up date your profile so they could maybe move in on your deal! It sounds like a good price for the bike and I would move on it before someone else does!
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Old 07-10-2012, 09:46 PM   #66979
acap650
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Location: Western PA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ghostdncr View Post
Whatever it is, mine's in about the same shape. It looks consistent though, both in terms of link to link wear and it's evenly spread along the length of the chain.
Mine is also consistent link to link but there is more wear on the left side (outside) plates. Not sure if this started when I went to the 16T front sprocket. I also tend to adjust my chain on the loose side which would tend to make it contact the lower roller more often, I think?




I just tightened the chain one click so I'll see if the wear diminishes. I run a loobman oiler so the outside of the links should be oiley and wet, not shiney and dry. Still stumped.
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Old 07-10-2012, 09:55 PM   #66980
bohawk
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unusual chain wear

Quote:
Originally Posted by acap650 View Post
On a recent long ride (5K miles) while checking chain slack I noticed that small flats are appearing on the outside of my chain links as if something is contacting the chain. Well, since I was about to travel a few thousand more miles I decided to replace the chain. It had about 12K miles and was showing some stretch but was under the limit. The new chain now has about 4K miles and I'm seeing the same wear again.
I would not worry. The chain will get a bit closer to the rear guide as the bike squats and that along with the chain slack is probably letting it hit the guide. Have you cleaned the guide and looked at it? I have the same but heavier wear on my chain. It currently has spun around for 9500 miles. There is nothing metallic remotely close to the chain.


The first half of its life was on 14/46 gearing with the stock rear guide. The wear on the rear guide matches the wear on the chain. I believe the chain lube residue and the grit from mostly off road riding in my case creates an abrasive slurry on the guide that acts like lapping compound and this is the result after a few gazillion revolutions. Okay, it is probably not that many. I will do the math later.


The last half has been on 15/47 gearing with a Kientech rear guide. The wear on the chain guide is less but it is still visible in the picture below. I think I was running with too much chain slack for a long time, too. I just recently removed the top roller but it had very little wear on it. The lower roller still spins freely so I do not think it is contributing much to this.




I did not realize my guide was taking such a beating until looking at that picture.
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Old 07-10-2012, 10:53 PM   #66981
MeterPig
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Paul from HDB got back to me. The measurements for the top clamp on a stock DR350 96+ are 100x33/35mm

Yes, they are the best....and I must have them.
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Old 07-11-2012, 12:02 AM   #66982
heirhead
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Buy it

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ride-til-sore! View Post
Um, I think someone wanted you to up date your profile so they could maybe move in on your deal! It sounds like a good price for the bike and I would move on it before someone else does!
Hello,

Ride it home!!!
I am selling a 2007 f650 gs dakar with 560 miles on it. It is tough for some people to believe it. Also have a 09 dr650 that is better suited for me and I have it ready to go anywhere, the dakar is bone stock. Just look under bike at frame, bottom of engine and all over. Check oil level. Tires should still have teets on them, Should be very easy to check if mileage looks correct, look at speedo cable. no smoke at all!!! People sound like they do not know what they have and if it all looks good and it starts, runs and shifts correctly, sounds like you have a great bike and deal. Brakes might be noisy a little but that will go away with a little riding. Like someone else said, dont worry about tank as you will replace it soon. Good luck with purchase, I really like mine and have had many bikes.

Heirhead
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Old 07-11-2012, 12:08 AM   #66983
PHILinFRANCE
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bohawk View Post
I would not worry. The chain will get a bit closer to the rear guide as the bike squats and that along with the chain slack is probably letting it hit the guide. Have you cleaned the guide and looked at it? I have the same but heavier wear on my chain. It currently has spun around for 9500 miles. There is nothing metallic remotely close to the chain.


The first half of its life was on 14/46 gearing with the stock rear guide. The wear on the rear guide matches the wear on the chain. I believe the chain lube residue and the grit from mostly off road riding in my case creates an abrasive slurry on the guide that acts like lapping compound and this is the result after a few gazillion revolutions. Okay, it is probably not that many. I will do the math later.


The last half has been on 15/47 gearing with a Kientech rear guide. The wear on the chain guide is less but it is still visible in the picture below. I think I was running with too much chain slack for a long time, too. I just recently removed the top roller but it had very little wear on it. The lower roller still spins freely so I do not think it is contributing much to this.




I did not realize my guide was taking such a beating until looking at that picture.
Yep , like the man said "Don't worry" mines been the same on the last 3 chains , then again i do a lot of dirty riding
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Old 07-11-2012, 12:31 AM   #66984
ER70S-2
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Location: SE Denver-ish
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Quote:
Originally Posted by advriderwannabe View Post
Hello Everyone,

Seems like the DR650 is ok for a first bike from what I've read. I came across one in a town about 3.5 hours from my house which is a 2007 DR650SE with 768 miles on it.

She said the bike was checked by a mechanic and there is just normal wear and tear on the bike. I asked her if the bike produces any smoke --
she said that all dual sports produce exhaust/smoke.
That's funny. Have you ever watched a woman try to work a screwdriver, pliers or Cresent wrench? With the exception of my Sister, Greer, and two or three others on the site, ladies don't understand anything made out of metal, except expensive jewelery. White smoke is condensation burning off like any vehicle when cold. Smoke with a bluish tint is burning oil; not necessarily bad if it quits shortly after starting. Anything showing black is rich; you're seeing wasted fuel. It may be hard to start and won't idle without the choke; it's five years old and is probably full of stale gas. Open the gas cap and take a sniff, it should be obvious.

Quote:
Originally Posted by advriderwannabe View Post
.......anything else i should be looking for?
Abuse: dings, rust, UV rot, torn seat, broken turn signals, scratched plastic, bent frame rails under the engine, broken levers, etc.
Quote:
......what do you guys think of the price? I would think 768 miles on a 2007 DR650 is literally nothing for this type of bike..

Thanks again for the help..
Pics are good if you have them, here's how:
http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=919

Being that new and low mileage, chances are very good it's in great condition. DRs are catching on and becoming hard to get at bottom dollar. If it's clean, someone will snatch it up if you hesitate. It doesn't matter what you pay for it, it wil make you smile for many thousands of miles: see my sig.

Quote:
Originally Posted by acap650 View Post
On a recent long ride (5K miles) while checking chain slack I noticed that small flats are appearing on the outside of my chain links as if something is contacting the chain.

Could this be normal wear from dirt abrasion as it contacts the roller and lower chain guide?

Anybody else have this kind of wear?

Should I stop worrying?
Yes stop worrying. That's normal chain wear. Somewhere back in this thread there were several photos from different imates showing that wear on different bikes. Some worse, some less. And too loose is always better than too tight. (get yer mind outta the gutter )

Past my bedtime.
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Quote:
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"BTW, I don't do style. It's a dirt bike, not some girlie dress-up thing." -
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Old 07-11-2012, 03:16 AM   #66985
Snowy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PHILinFRANCE View Post
Yep , like the man said "Don't worry" mines been the same on the last 3 chains , then again i do a lot of dirty riding
Yeah, it's just the dirt wearing the links down.

Wet clay isn't so bad, some greases are actually clay based. High silica areas seem to knock them around more.

The dryer the chain, the more you'll see it.
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Old 07-11-2012, 05:26 AM   #66986
Tyrepower
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Location: Perth WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wncstrada View Post
Ever gone to a grand opening and registered for a door prize - knowing that your chances of winning were astromomical? Well, back in May my luck finally turned. Ohlins USA is located a few miles away from me in Hendersonville NC. I saw on the internet that they were going to have an Open House, and that the door prize was a free shock. Well, why not go? My wife and I went by and saw their impressive facility and lots of tricked out bikes. A few days later I got a call from Gary Christopher at Ohlins - I had won the shock! That also created a problem because Ohlins does lot list a shock for the DR650. After a little research, Gary came up with a plan: they would try to adapt the Ohlins DRZ400 shock to my 650. The pictures below show the results. I've gone from a spring and a prayer to a very controlled rear suspension. Gary told me that the new shock is a very tight fit!





After about 2 rides it was clear that the new shock was a vast improvement and that I needed to upgrade my front forks. Rick Tannenbaum at Cogent Dynamics was extremely helpful and did the emulators / springs upgrade. Now the bike is much more balanced.

I just did about 50 miles of Forest Service roads today and I'm really impressed with the bike and the suspension. I had not planned to work on the forks or shock this year but I'm glad that I got lucky and that there are such great resources nearby. I've got nothing but great things to say about Gary at Ohlins and Rick at Cogent Dynamics.
Why don't you have a chat with him and see if he would be interested in doing a few more!! I for one would have one in a heart beat.
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Old 07-11-2012, 05:39 AM   #66987
Tyrepower
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Oh yeah, well done you lucky so and so!!
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Old 07-11-2012, 08:01 AM   #66988
Rusty Rocket
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Location: Trying to leave CT
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MeterPig View Post
Paul from HDB got back to me. The measurements for the top clamp on a stock DR350 96+ are 100x33/35mm

Yes, they are the best....and I must have them.
Those top clamps are great for off road. They tie the 2 handlebar clamps together and prevent them from twisting independently when the bar comes in contact with the ground.
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Old 07-11-2012, 08:32 AM   #66989
acap650
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Location: Western PA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bohawk View Post
I would not worry. The chain will get a bit closer to the rear guide as the bike squats and that along with the chain slack is probably letting it hit the guide. Have you cleaned the guide and looked at it? I have the same but heavier wear on my chain. It currently has spun around for 9500 miles. There is nothing metallic remotely close to the chain.


The first half of its life was on 14/46 gearing with the stock rear guide. The wear on the rear guide matches the wear on the chain. I believe the chain lube residue and the grit from mostly off road riding in my case creates an abrasive slurry on the guide that acts like lapping compound and this is the result after a few gazillion revolutions. Okay, it is probably not that many. I will do the math later.


The last half has been on 15/47 gearing with a Kientech rear guide. The wear on the chain guide is less but it is still visible in the picture below. I think I was running with too much chain slack for a long time, too. I just recently removed the top roller but it had very little wear on it. The lower roller still spins freely so I do not think it is contributing much to this.




I did not realize my guide was taking such a beating until looking at that picture.
Thanks for that. I guess I'm not the only one with this kind of chain wear. When I looked at my guide there was very little evidence of contact but with the stock rear sprocket it would not come as close as yours does with an oversize sprocket.
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Old 07-11-2012, 10:29 AM   #66990
maynard911
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Originally Posted by BergDonk View Post
No, a Megacyle muffler with 'tea strainer' end cap fitted and FMF pb header.
Thanks for the reply. I looked at the Megacycle web site and there is no listing for the DR, is yours a sportbike muffler adapted to fit?
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