ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Thumpers
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 10-30-2012, 10:14 PM   #70591
Klay
dreaming adventurer
 
Klay's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2005
Location: right here on my thermarest
Oddometer: 100,819
Rick got hurt. There's something wrong with his hip. That may not have anything to do with his choice of kit or even his preparedeness for the trip in terms of skill. It's just chance. Waste of time to go into it here.
__________________
.



windigo
Klay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2012, 10:19 PM   #70592
ER70S-2
Beastly Adventurer
 
ER70S-2's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2009
Location: SE Denver-ish
Oddometer: 5,926
Quote:
Originally Posted by McAdoo View Post
Many Thanks, ER70S-2, the cheque's in the mail.
__________________
2004 DR650: 62,400 miles
2013 WR250R

SUZUKI DR650SE INFORMATION INDEX
Quote:
Originally Posted by Threewheelbonnie View Post
"BTW, I don't do style. It's a dirt bike, not some girlie dress-up thing." -
ER70S-2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2012, 11:21 PM   #70593
Rex Nemo
horizon calling
 
Rex Nemo's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2008
Location: SF Bay
Oddometer: 313
As someone who has done some overlanding on a DR650 (lived on the bike for 3 months up to Alaska and back, solo--far less intense and remote than the ride being discussed), Rick's load wasn't that enormous. Definitely intense for mud of that depth, but striking that balance between being self sufficient and packing light enough for a good ride is one of the big challenges of adv-type riding. Rick took the gamble bravely, and his dice came up snake eyes; good that he was not more severely injured, used his good judgment, and got to spend the rest of the summer riding his own way.

I elected, for example, to forego carrying tires and fork seals to keep my weight down...which was a fine thing for lighter packing, but when I blew a fork seal in the Wrangell-St. Elias wilderness, it wasn't so hot. And a ride through Russia and the 'stans multiplies the roughness of the terrain and the unavailability of parts or mechanical support.

Of course, loading the bike up like a mule and trying to slog it through mud for a month isn't precisely...fun, but some of us are attracted to the idea. When I've been mired in muck with a 60-pound load of gear in the freezing sleet, with the pig of a DR wallowing all over, knowing that the vultures would get me before any rescuers, it seemed the very apex of madness and stupidity. The DR, at those times, seemed a primitive, heavy hunk of lead, the terrain downright menacing.



But to see the vast plains of the tundra explode into rainbows, seemingly for me alone, a tiny bike and human lost in a vast landscape...or sipping whiskey by the glow of the almost-midnight sun, with my tent and bike beside me...or whooping with joy at tackling a tough (for me) trail successfully, and seeing a side of the mountain I'd never have glimpsed otherwise.

The DR, at those times, seemed a stalwart and redoubtable companion, and flying over the landscape aboard it seemed the most perfect thing in the world.



And a +1 on teamwork when riding in tough country, though it can be frustrating when the skill level/pain level/risk acceptance level of the riders are mismatched. But you've only got one another out there.

Mind you, I took one of those trips an earlier poster described this summer--trucked little bikes to Colorado, and did some great, rewarding day rides over the passes with a friend. Man, it was a luxury with such a light load! But when you want to go deep, you need a few things.
__________________
Wandering re-establishes the original harmony which once existed between man and the universe. --Anatole France
Rex Nemo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2012, 11:26 PM   #70594
McAdoo
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: Brisbane Northside
Oddometer: 502
Thanks again, ER70S-2, I've been digging around and it looks like my bike may have been wired as per the "Others" wiring diagram, as you mentioned.
This shows the black wire from the CDI connected to the switch on the carb to retard the ignition at full throttle.
McAdoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2012, 11:36 PM   #70595
Phreaky Phil
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Mar 2006
Location: NEW ZEALAND
Oddometer: 1,733
Quote:
Originally Posted by Albie View Post
Bwahaaa Like the TAT is any big thing. Could do ,most of it in a car.
Have you ridden the TAT ?
Phreaky Phil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2012, 12:15 AM   #70596
ER70S-2
Beastly Adventurer
 
ER70S-2's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2009
Location: SE Denver-ish
Oddometer: 5,926
Ooops, a day late and a dollar short.

Quote:
Originally Posted by McAdoo View Post
Org/Wh = +12volt supply
Blk/Wh = neg ground
Org/Yell = connects the 100R resistor to ground when ignition switch is on
White/Blu = Output to ignition coil primary winding
Green/ Blu = To R3 and neutral switch ??
Black = ????

There is a line diagram in the manual the shows the black wire from the CDI connected to Blk/ White negative ground.
This is not the case on my bike. The wire appears to be open circuit.

Anyone know about the mysteries of this part of the circuit?
My plug has the same 6 wires you do.

Looks like you're one of "The Others".
So it looks like 'black' goes to the throttle switch which lives on the right side of the carb, where the brass tube is in this photo (couldn't find one with the switch). The diagram looks like there should be two wires there, not a single wire looking for a ground in the carb.

__________________
2004 DR650: 62,400 miles
2013 WR250R

SUZUKI DR650SE INFORMATION INDEX
Quote:
Originally Posted by Threewheelbonnie View Post
"BTW, I don't do style. It's a dirt bike, not some girlie dress-up thing." -
ER70S-2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2012, 12:23 AM   #70597
PPCLI-Jim
Gnarly Adventurer
 
PPCLI-Jim's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2012
Location: Victoria BC where I ride year round.
Oddometer: 221
Quote "Of course, loading the bike up like a mule and trying to slog it through mud for a month isn't precisely...fun, but some of us are attracted to the idea. When I've been mired in muck with a 60-pound load of gear in the freezing sleet, with the pig of a DR wallowing all over, knowing that the vultures would get me before any rescuers, it seemed the very apex of madness and stupidity. The DR, at those times, seemed a primitive, heavy hunk of lead, the terrain downright menacing."end quote

Jeez I used to be in the infantry now I am in the Royal Navy and I can easily understand that. I dont know how many times I ended up with more the 60 + lbs on my back and I get told by some voice over the radio to get a leg on. Well thats great but I still have to move my body + the weight and deal with the weather and terrain sir !! . Terrain always makes a difference. Riding a bike with an extra 200 lbs can be done easily on a highway, It gets more difficult as the terrain changes. I hardly can imagine what his DR must of felt like in the loose slick mud. Lets see I took my brand new DR on a trail ride or as I found out later a TRIALS ride, everyone else was on true trials bike or MX'ers.l At the end Guys walked up and said "I dont know how you did it I could not of."
I give him Kudos for at least trying it. Retirement looms just around the corner for me I hope I have that sort of gumption. I'm thinking about a trip to Asia on a 250, maybe that way I can get parts in whatever country I am. with all that in mind I wil lbe able to pick it up and move it but I will not be riding though 1/4 of the crap that the Road of Bones / Siberia 'Stans could through at these guys


Hats off to you good luck Good riding
__________________
I'm not saying to kill all the stupid people . .. Just remove the warning labels and let nature run it's course


http://www.youtube.com/user/spudhead/videos?view=0 my youtube channel

PPCLI-Jim screwed with this post 10-31-2012 at 12:26 AM Reason: cleaning up my pre school mistakes
PPCLI-Jim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2012, 12:31 AM   #70598
George 99
Studly Adventurer
 
George 99's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2008
Location: Kingman, Arizona
Oddometer: 772
Quote:
Originally Posted by PPCLI-Jim View Post
Quote "Of course, loading the bike up like a mule and trying to slog it through mud for a month isn't precisely...fun, but some of us are attracted to the idea. When I've been mired in muck with a 60-pound load of gear in the freezing sleet, with the pig of a DR wallowing all over, knowing that the vultures would get me before any rescuers, it seemed the very apex of madness and stupidity. The DR, at those times, seemed a primitive, heavy hunk of lead, the terrain downright menacing."end quote

Jeez I used to be in the infantry now I am in the Royal Navy and I can easily understand that. I dont know how many times I ended up with more the 60 + lbs on my back and I get told by some voice over the radio to get a leg on. Well thats great but I still have to move my body + the weight and deal with the weather and terrain sir !! . Terrain always makes a difference. Riding a bike with an extra 200 lbs can be done easily on a highway, It gets more difficult as the terrain changes. I hardly can imagine what his DR must of felt like in the loose slick mud. Lets see I took my brand new DR on a trail ride or as I found out later a TRIALS ride, everyone else was on true trials bike or MX'ers.l At the end Guys walked up and said "I dont know how you did it I could not of."
I give him Kudos for at least trying it. Retirement looms just around the corner for me I hope I have that sort of gumption. I'm thinking about a trip to Asia on a 250, maybe that way I can get parts in whatever country I am. with all that in mind I wil lbe able to pick it up and move it but I will not be riding though 1/4 of the crap that the Road of Bones / Siberia 'Stans could through at these guys


Hats off to you good luck Good riding
Jim, here's a S.E.A. trip for ya:
http://ridefor cambodia.com

I, along with some friends, are headed over in Janurary for the 2013 event. Gonna ride 125s.
__________________
George
Sometimes in Kingman, Arizona
George 99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2012, 12:43 AM   #70599
Phreaky Phil
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Mar 2006
Location: NEW ZEALAND
Oddometer: 1,733
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rex Nemo View Post
As someone who has done some overlanding on a DR650 (lived on the bike for 3 months up to Alaska and back, solo--far less intense and remote than the ride being discussed), Rick's load wasn't that enormous. Definitely intense for mud of that depth, but striking that balance between being self sufficient and packing light enough for a good ride is one of the big challenges of adv-type riding. Rick took the gamble bravely, and his dice came up snake eyes; good that he was not more severely injured, used his good judgment, and got to spend the rest of the summer riding his own way.

I elected, for example, to forego carrying tires and fork seals to keep my weight down...which was a fine thing for lighter packing, but when I blew a fork seal in the Wrangell-St. Elias wilderness, it wasn't so hot. And a ride through Russia and the 'stans multiplies the roughness of the terrain and the unavailability of parts or mechanical support.

Of course, loading the bike up like a mule and trying to slog it through mud for a month isn't precisely...fun, but some of us are attracted to the idea. When I've been mired in muck with a 60-pound load of gear in the freezing sleet, with the pig of a DR wallowing all over, knowing that the vultures would get me before any rescuers, it seemed the very apex of madness and stupidity. The DR, at those times, seemed a primitive, heavy hunk of lead, the terrain downright menacing.



But to see the vast plains of the tundra explode into rainbows, seemingly for me alone, a tiny bike and human lost in a vast landscape...or sipping whiskey by the glow of the almost-midnight sun, with my tent and bike beside me...or whooping with joy at tackling a tough (for me) trail successfully, and seeing a side of the mountain I'd never have glimpsed otherwise.

The DR, at those times, seemed a stalwart and redoubtable companion, and flying over the landscape aboard it seemed the most perfect thing in the world.



And a +1 on teamwork when riding in tough country, though it can be frustrating when the skill level/pain level/risk acceptance level of the riders are mismatched. But you've only got one another out there.

Mind you, I took one of those trips an earlier poster described this summer--trucked little bikes to Colorado, and did some great, rewarding day rides over the passes with a friend. Man, it was a luxury with such a light load! But when you want to go deep, you need a few things.
Neat luggage set up you have there. My wife and I just finished the TAT a few weeks ago and as you can imagine luggage placement is even more difficult 2up. We had Ortlieb soft panniers and a rear roll bag. I still would have liked to be lighter. The rear roll bag is weight that's high and way back.
That really affects the handling. When you look at Walters and Terry's bags they are mounted as low as possible.
I will be re-visiting our luggage set up when the bike gets back to NZ.
Phreaky Phil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2012, 06:50 AM   #70600
Albie
Kool Aid poisoner
 
Albie's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2004
Location: NWA
Oddometer: 9,250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mongle View Post
I guess you have been on "bigger" rides then? I would love to read the ride report. Or is sacasm the only thing you have to contribute?
Sure have, in fact last week rode all the way over to Starbucks and had a triple soy latte. Still working on the ride report!
__________________
Good. Bad. I'm the guy with the gun.

Another day, another foot injury!
Albie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2012, 09:40 AM   #70601
bouldertag
WannabenarlyADV'rrrr
 
bouldertag's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2008
Location: Utah
Oddometer: 447
Fine Bike, Very fine Bike

I ride the Wasatch front and up to the uintahs. Quite a altitude change. The DR doesn't miss a beat. I weigh 270 pound without gear. With gear and back pack full of water maybe 285 to 290. I ride with full saddlebags about 35 pounds together. A Giant loop Mojave bag = 25 pounds of stuff. A custom tool box on the left side = 15 pounds of stuff. And one big bag with tent and belongings = another 20 pounds or so.
Oh and one more thing a 120 pound daughter on the hardly any room seat behind me. She sits on the Mojave bag.

With all this weight this bike does not skip a beat. it amazes me. Going up to higher altitude i have no problems what so ever. Cruises fine at 80 MPHs up all the hills. The steeper ones on the higher altitudes It takes longer to get to 80 (i mean real steep 45 to 75 grade).

This bike is heavy compared to a 250 but light as hell compared to a 990 adventure, ST, BMW GS and any other two cylinder i believe.

Anyways when i go single track It does just fine. Got to have the right front tire and I personally think it is not that far behind my KTM 450sx in slow trail riding. For fast past single trail yes the KTM is way better. But i don't get the adventure feel going 35 - 55 on tight trails with the KTM, as I do with my DR as I don't go near that fast on the DR, I could try but would not be wise at all.. I actually see Moose, Deer, Elk and one black bear on the DR. The KTM I have never seen any animals. Kind of funny ahe? Ya the KTM is fun but man i am enjoying the DR a lot more. And it is soooo nice not to trailer a bike to ride. Damn nice.

Anyways only mods i have is stiffer suspension, Dynojet carb and supper-trap exhaust with open air box. Oh ya the Safari tank.
Using 15 tooth front CS. had the 14 but started doing allot of freeway with daughter and I like the easy cruzn. Change when i do trails back to 14.

Great Bike.
I love the new bikes coming out and i might get one someday but right now i really don't need one due to this dang DR. Every time i decide to sell it and go get a 15k to 20k bike i get the guiltiness as i know this damn DR does everything i really need. penny's on the dollar also. I can use the extra money i save on the dr to pay for hotels food and camping gear and gas for more trips with my daughter and not go into dept doing so.

ok now off my soapbox sorry everyone. Just incase someone is considering a new bike to do many types of riding this should be your purchase.
Boulder
__________________
Burn out dont fade away!!

bouldertag screwed with this post 10-31-2012 at 09:47 AM
bouldertag is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2012, 10:30 AM   #70602
Feelers
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Location: Anchorage, Alaska
Oddometer: 186
Question

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rex Nemo View Post


Is that the Coyote bag or the Great Basin?
Feelers is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2012, 11:41 AM   #70603
cueball
should'a walked it first
 
cueball's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2007
Location: lake serene, ms. at least it was 'til i moved in!!
Oddometer: 724
Quote:
Originally Posted by bouldertag View Post
I ride the Wasatch front and up to the uintahs. Quite a altitude change. The DR doesn't miss a beat. I weigh 270 pound without gear. With gear and back pack full of water maybe 285 to 290. I ride with full saddlebags about 35 pounds together. A Giant loop Mojave bag = 25 pounds of stuff. A custom tool box on the left side = 15 pounds of stuff. And one big bag with tent and belongings = another 20 pounds or so.
Oh and one more thing a 120 pound daughter on the hardly any room seat behind me. She sits on the Mojave bag.

With all this weight this bike does not skip a beat. it amazes me. Going up to higher altitude i have no problems what so ever. Cruises fine at 80 MPHs up all the hills. The steeper ones on the higher altitudes It takes longer to get to 80 (i mean real steep 45 to 75 grade).

This bike is heavy compared to a 250 but light as hell compared to a 990 adventure, ST, BMW GS and any other two cylinder i believe.

Anyways when i go single track It does just fine. Got to have the right front tire and I personally think it is not that far behind my KTM 450sx in slow trail riding. For fast past single trail yes the KTM is way better. But i don't get the adventure feel going 35 - 55 on tight trails with the KTM, as I do with my DR as I don't go near that fast on the DR, I could try but would not be wise at all.. I actually see Moose, Deer, Elk and one black bear on the DR. The KTM I have never seen any animals. Kind of funny ahe? Ya the KTM is fun but man i am enjoying the DR a lot more. And it is soooo nice not to trailer a bike to ride. Damn nice.

Anyways only mods i have is stiffer suspension, Dynojet carb and supper-trap exhaust with open air box. Oh ya the Safari tank.
Using 15 tooth front CS. had the 14 but started doing allot of freeway with daughter and I like the easy cruzn. Change when i do trails back to 14.

Great Bike.
I love the new bikes coming out and i might get one someday but right now i really don't need one due to this dang DR. Every time i decide to sell it and go get a 15k to 20k bike i get the guiltiness as i know this damn DR does everything i really need. penny's on the dollar also. I can use the extra money i save on the dr to pay for hotels food and camping gear and gas for more trips with my daughter and not go into dept doing so.

ok now off my soapbox sorry everyone. Just incase someone is considering a new bike to do many types of riding this should be your purchase.
Boulder

i couldn't agree more!! i have owned way more bikes than i can remember, including a ktm 950a, a 640 a, two 640e's (used to be my favorite dual sport), a dakar, a 1150gsa, a couple of 1100 gs's, a couple of gspd's, a r100gs, a transalp etc etc.

i acquired my dr in a trade recently and fully intended to sell it, but after a few rides, i am really suprised at how capable & comfortable it is. i have been through places it shouldn't go, but it just tractored through & up!! it was well set by the p.o. & works really well both on & off road.
__________________
frank
lake serene
ktm 950, r1150gsa, r1100gs
cueball is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2012, 11:47 AM   #70604
Rob.G
Mostly Harmless
 
Rob.G's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2010
Location: Fulltiming in an RV!
Oddometer: 2,132
Steering Bearings

I just ordered new steering bearings from ProCycle. Is there a link to a HOWTO on changing these out? I have the service manual, but wanted to ask here first. I'm not sure if I have the tools needed to do this, especially if it requires them to be pressed on or off.

Something weird is going on with my steering. I've posted about it here before but never figured it out. But it feels like there's an on-center "detent" that makes it very hard to actually turn the bars ever so slightly (whether countersteering at speed, or regular steering at low speeds) that makes it necessary to exaggerate. I've used four different sets of tires on the bike and it does it with all of them, so it's not the tires. So it comes down to either the steering bearings or maybe something in the forks. The detent, or "notch," is undetectable with the front wheel off the ground, but with weight on the front wheel, even at a standstill, it's easy to feel. My KLX250S doesn't do this and neither does my FZ1.

Rob
__________________
'12 Suzuki V-Strom DL650
'96 Suzuki DR650
'10 Kawasaki KLX351S #320 For Sale!
Rob.G is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2012, 11:57 AM   #70605
Sammalamma
Adventurer
 
Sammalamma's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2012
Location: Driftin'
Oddometer: 60
The pannier predicament

Hey DR lovers,

I have a pannier predicament. I currently have the 7.5" Happy Trail Teton panniers on my DR650SE. While I am happy with how they have performed thus far, I would like to get a little more storage space so I'm planning on updating to the 9" versions. As the bike sits right now, the right side pannier sticks out farther from center than the left side pannier due to the muffler. It seems some versions of the pannier racks compensate for this and some do not. Mine, unfortunately, do not. With that said, have any of you mounted different sized panniers to make them stick out equally from the center of the bike? For example) If I put the 9" box on the left side and the 7.5" box on the right side they'll stick out equally from the center of the bike. Or even the 10" on the left side and the 9" on the right side.

Have any of you done this? Do you guys think this would look funny? Does anyone have any experience with the (what seems like) humongous 10" pannier? Is it just too big?

Thanks guys!
Sam
__________________
"'Any bike's subframe is liable to crack with the extra weight of the luggage when travelling on corrugated dirt roads,' it said somewhere. Hmm, I thought... mental note: Strengthen subframe. Second mental note: Find out what subframe is." - Lois Pryce
Sammalamma is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 09:00 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014