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Old 01-01-2013, 07:33 AM   #72376
Mambo Dave
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Use talc powder (baby powder) all over tubes to allow them to slip & slide around while putting them in there. The last set of tires I did (the DR650's) I used baby powder on the tire beads (instead of soapy water) as well. Hard to believe I didn't screw all of it up, but the Shinkos are still holding air and good to go.
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Old 01-01-2013, 08:24 AM   #72377
jessepitt
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cobain View Post
I mounted, dismounted, and remounted my first rear tire today. Pinched the tube, patched it, then it leaked again, and i tore up the bead of the tire pretty good. That will be the last time i try to do that. I realize why i pay $25 now.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emmbeedee View Post
It's really not that difficult. Practice makes it easier.

You likely didn't keep the tire down in the deep part of the rim while trying to lever it on so it was probably a lot harder than it should be. Maybe you should get an old wheel and practice a few times? Knowing how to fix it will get you out of a long walk someday.
[QUOTE=Mambo Dave;20370237]Use talc powder (baby powder) all over tubes to allow them to slip & slide around while putting them in there.


These two pieces of advice are the biggest factors in an easy and successful tire change. Keeping the beads of the tire all the way into the rim (deepest part of the \-/ ) opposite where you are working your tire spoons is key. I have recently seen a zip tye used to keep the tire clamped together so that this is easier to accomplish, (I'm sure ERO7-S will be along with pictures shortly, lol). I started off using dish soap and water but have recently also switched to talc, both work great, talc is easier to carry and I've heard it helps keep the tube from chaffing after install too. You should use some kind of lube or something is going to get hurt. Like Emm said, this is a MUST HAVE skill if you ever plan to leave a paved road for any distance and will make you feel more comfortable doing so. I replaced my first tube in the field last summer after eight years of riding and it was a snap. It didn't take me much longer than it usually does in my shop and it was a good feeling to be able to fix it and keep riding. Don't get discouraged, its all in the technique and you can learn that with a little practice.

jessepitt screwed with this post 01-01-2013 at 08:39 AM
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Old 01-01-2013, 08:56 AM   #72378
sandwash
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Location: Flagstaff Az
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Had two new Shinko 230 Tour Masters to put on,the front one went on good and seated/no leaks.The rear one was tough,went to air up and it started spitting air.38-40$ at the shop, 20$ for the tube,16$ for the change out.
And I still have to replace the worn out nobbles with new D606's,front and rear(may just take the rear to the shop,only16$ for change out).
I have been using cable lube(have two buckets of the stuff).
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Old 01-01-2013, 09:01 AM   #72379
JagLite
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Location: Anchorage Alaska
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Thumb Exhaust bolt torque

Quote:
Originally Posted by kezzajohnson View Post
According to my manual, Exhaust bolts torque to 26NM
I believe you are thinking the exhaust CLAMP BOLT is the same as the header bolts.

The clamp bolt is torqued to 26nm (19 ft/lb), yes.

Thanks for checking

EDIT;
I had to check what the official Suzi manual says and after a long search I found it in the "periodic maintenance" section.
Page 2-14

You are correct Sir!
Suzi says that ALL the exhaust bolts are the same at 26nm (19 ft/lb)

So Clymer doesn't put the bolts in the same group in their new manual
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JagLite screwed with this post 01-01-2013 at 01:38 PM Reason: Researhing correct torque
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Old 01-01-2013, 10:09 AM   #72380
Feelers
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gippyphil View Post
Help me, DR650 riders, you're my only hope!

I dropped my 2011 DR, and bent the bars. By all accounts, this is not uncommon, and I have been reading threads on bar recommendations. However, it seems that the part the "bottom" part of the left bar clamp is also bent back about 10-15 degrees (see photo). This appears to be bolted on to the top of the forks (I can feel a bolt hole on the underside). If so, what is this replacement part called? If not, what is the whole "top of the forks" part called, and can it be fixed?

It's possible that nothing is actually bent. My bars were tweaked a lot after a crash as well. Try this before spending money on new stuff. Roll the bike up so the front wheel is next to something solid (telephone pole, wall, truck bumper, etc). Turn the handlebars in the direction necessary to make them align with the front wheel WITHOUT ALLOWING THE FRONT WHEEL TO TURN (steer, not roll).
The handlebars are rubber mounted and can easily be aligned and misaligned for damage resistance in crashes.
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Old 01-01-2013, 11:00 AM   #72381
Rusty Rocket
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Location: Trying to leave CT
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gippyphil View Post
Help me, DR650 riders, you're my only hope!

I dropped my 2011 DR, and bent the bars. By all accounts, this is not uncommon, and I have been reading threads on bar recommendations. However, it seems that the part the "bottom" part of the left bar clamp is also bent back about 10-15 degrees (see photo). This appears to be bolted on to the top of the forks (I can feel a bolt hole on the underside). If so, what is this replacement part called? If not, what is the whole "top of the forks" part called, and can it be fixed?

Loosen the bolts on the bar clamps. There are rubber cones (parts 12 &13 in the attached diagram)that are probably deformed. They will go back to their original shape as soon as you unclamp the bars. Be sure bolt # 11 isn't bent.

http://www.ronayers.com/Fiche/TypeID.../STEERING_STEM
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Old 01-01-2013, 11:02 AM   #72382
procycle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Feelers View Post
It's possible that nothing is actually bent.
He's definitely got bent parts. The bars are toast and the bolt that goes through the left clamp is obviously very bent. It's a pretty easy fix. The front end may also be twisted but the place to start is new bars and a new clamp bolt.
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Old 01-01-2013, 11:05 AM   #72383
Adv Grifter
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Location: Passing ADV Stalkers in California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cobain View Post
I mounted, dismounted, and remounted my first rear tire today. Pinched the tube, patched it, then it leaked again, and i tore up the bead of the tire pretty good. That will be the last time i try to do that. I realize why i pay $25 now.
Tires are tough, no question. Experience helps ... but I've been doing it for years and still suffer ... but I'm cheap and don't have all the best and proper tools. Having the right tools and techniques really makes things much easier. Take it from a "right bodger" !

On the DR certain rear road tires can be VERY tough to break the bead on.
A real bead breaker is a must. The Avon Distanzia can be a real BEAR to break the bead on.

For remounting try using the BIG Zip tie method. Documented here somewhere ... but basically using 4 or 5 BIG HD Zip ties to squish the two beads together to get the tire beads deep into the wheel well. This means less chance to pinch a tube and easier to pop it back on. Good smooth nose irons really help too. Once tire is on ... pull Zip ties out!

But in the end ... if you have room and some extra cash ... think about something like the No-Mar tire machine. A God Send!
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Old 01-01-2013, 11:17 AM   #72384
Adv Grifter
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Location: Passing ADV Stalkers in California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by procycle View Post
He's definitely got bent parts. The bars are toast and the bolt that goes through the left clamp is obviously very bent. It's a pretty easy fix. The front end may also be twisted but the place to start is new bars and a new clamp bolt.
Have to agree ... those bars do look bent. So many times its just the rubber steering dampers tweaked and no real bent bars ... but in this case stuff looks bent to me.

As noted, easy fix. New bars, new through bolt(s). The bolt that is UNDER the handle bars and goes through lower bar mount, through top triple, and through cone shaped rubber damper, nut holds it under triple clamp.
Forks may be tweaked too ... just tap them on a pole or curb to straighten or loosen upper and lower triple clamp bolts, wiggle bars, re-tighten.
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Old 01-01-2013, 12:44 PM   #72385
ER70S-2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jessepitt View Post
These two pieces of advice are the biggest factors in an easy and successful tire change. Keeping the beads of the tire all the way into the rim (deepest part of the \-/ ) opposite where you are working your tire spoons is key. I have recently seen a zip tye used to keep the tire clamped together so that this is easier to accomplish, (I'm sure ER70-S will be along with pictures shortly, lol).


Poor guy couldn't figure out that it's ok to use his knees to hold the wheel and tire down. When you have a tube, start at the valve stem.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=S6WPzRRJLpA
Quote:
Originally Posted by jessepitt View Post
I started off using dish soap and water but have recently also switched to talc, both work great, talc is easier to carry and I've heard it helps keep the tube from chaffing after install too. You should use some kind of lube or something is going to get hurt.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jessepitt View Post
Like Emm said, this is a MUST HAVE skill if you ever plan to leave a paved road for any distance and will make you feel more comfortable doing so. I replaced my first tube in the field last summer after eight years of riding and it was a snap. It didn't take me much longer than it usually does in my shop and it was a good feeling to be able to fix it and keep riding. Don't get discouraged, its all in the technique and you can learn that with a little practice.


Quote:
Originally Posted by gippyphil View Post
Help me, DR650 riders, you're my only hope!

I dropped my 2011 DR, and bent the bars. By all accounts, this is not uncommon, and I have been reading threads on bar recommendations. However, it seems that the part the "bottom" part of the left bar clamp is also bent back about 10-15 degrees (see photo). This appears to be bolted on to the top of the forks (I can feel a bolt hole on the underside). If so, what is this replacement part called? If not, what is the whole "top of the forks" part called, and can it be fixed?

For the hard of seeing; the bars are bent, look at the cross bar right at the speedo. Phil, see Rusty's link for the bolt you want to check. If it's bent too, I would buy a new one and not try to straighten yours.

The 'top of the forks' is called the upper triple clamp. It's probably not bent, but is replaceable.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Threewheelbonnie View Post
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Old 01-01-2013, 12:55 PM   #72386
gippyphil
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Location: Gippsland, Victoria, Australia
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Thanks everyone for your advice - I will take the bars apart tonight and have a look-see. Looking at how some of the bar clamps work, I can see that the through-bolt may not be bent, but at least it's a cheap part if it is. That stage-by-stage photo tip is a good one - I have used that in the past when disassembling machinery prior to moving it.

I will see what Renthal bars are available around here locally, and failing that order some online. I think this is a good time to get some higher bars, and/or some bar risers, as the stock DR bars are way to low for (6' 2") me to ride standing up.

Also, I'm going to get some decent knobby tires for the bike as that was at least a contributing factor to me coming off. I notice that's a strongly debated area, but it seems everyone agrees that anything is better offroad than the stock tires.
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Old 01-01-2013, 02:38 PM   #72387
gippyphil
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New set of Renthal bars and grips, Dunlop 606s to be fitted next week :)
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Old 01-01-2013, 03:25 PM   #72388
Carl Childers
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cobain View Post
I mounted, dismounted, and remounted my first rear tire today. Pinched the tube, patched it, then it leaked again, and i tore up the bead of the tire pretty good. That will be the last time i try to do that. I realize why i pay $25 now.
For years I was terrible at tires.......always pinching a tube, struggling to get the tire on the rim, total frustration! Probably my biggest mistake was not getting the tire bead down into the rim recess . Then a pal who is a pro flat tracker and has changed more than his share in the early days of his race career helped me change a few tires and walked me through it step by step. Since then I've been Mr Tire, have my own balancer and do all my bikes myself which saves me a lot of $$.

The reason I mention all this is to say use the mounting tips the other members have posted and with some patience and practice you'll have it down and be and old hand at changing tires in no time.
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Old 01-01-2013, 05:04 PM   #72389
DockingPilot
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Location: Andover, N.J.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl Childers View Post
Then a pal who is a pro flat tracker and has changed more than his share in the early days of his race career helped me change a few tires and walked me through it step by step. Since then I've been Mr Tire, have my own balancer and do all my bikes myself which saves me a lot of $$.

The reason I mention all this is to say use the mounting tips the other members have posted and with some patience and practice you'll have it down and be and old hand at changing tires in no time.
My riding buddy is a 2 time 6 Days ISDE rider and multi time East Coast Enduro Grand Champion.
Can change a tube out quicker time then most take just to get the wheel off the bike

But I can and do it, myself. A must know skill to have for sure.
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Old 01-01-2013, 05:28 PM   #72390
GSF1200S
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Joined: Jul 2012
Location: Austin, Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VooDooDaddy View Post
In my opinion, anyone who would buy a new DR650 is either very mechanically ignorant, desperate, or simply not very smart. I know that statement might seem kinda harsh, but you have to realize if you could find a nice 1996 DR650 somewhere, it would be essentially the same motorcycle as a 2012 DR650.

I bought a pretty nice 2000 DR650 late last summer from a really nice guy moving from Nebraska to Flordia (hope things are going well for you Jerry) for $1800. The bike had just a tick over 10,000 miles, which is nothing to a DR motor. The 2000 DR650 I now own was mostly ridden on the street and was very clean and well maintained. While I could have chosen to ride it AS-IS, and simply continue to do routine maintenance; and probably ride it for many years and then re-sell it; I have chosen to take the money I have saved on NOT buying anywhere close to new, and I am in the process of transforming my soon-to-be thirteen year old bike into one that is much better than a new bike at far under what a new bike costs.

You asked our advice, and my advice is to find a well-cared for used DR650, buy it, replace all the consumables it needs, continue to do routine maintenance, ride it, and enjoy it knowing you saved thousands of dollars over someone who bought a new DR650; which as I mentioned is essentially the same bike you will be riding regardless of model year.
I did exactly as you describe, and for the most part I agree with you. However, if I were going to South America, Id buy new and get the 5 year unlimited mileage warranty. If you could manage to find one 2010 and up where it only had one owner, that would work too since I believe you can buy the warranty if you are the 2nd owner of the bike. That is a huge huge boon to have when taking a trip like that. Say something freak happens (is 3rd gear really a freak?)- that could be the difference between the end of your trip or simply a (possibly long) delay.

For that matter, despite my bike having only 7500 miles and it mostly being commuted in an area with few stop lights, I sometimes wish I had bought new just for that warranty- thats a big slice of piece of mind.

But again, I do agree in principle. Especially if not taking a long trip, you could even get a spare motor from a wrecked DR and keep it on the side. Thats piece of mind and costs about the same as a warranty.
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