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Old 05-07-2013, 07:16 PM   #76426
poppawheelie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by procycle View Post
You might find this interesting
--> http://drriders.com/topic8180.html
I measured the actual shock travel and calculated the linkage leverage ratios.
Yes indeedd, that is interestng. Thanks.
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Old 05-07-2013, 09:21 PM   #76427
Kommando
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Quote:
Originally Posted by acesandeights View Post
It must be dependent on riding style and locale because I thought the shock was really inadequate. The first time I was on a gravel road with washboard I knew the stock suspension was going to put me in a ditch with what I consider normal riding style.
I just have springs rated for my 200lb, and the main time I notice poor suspension is riding humps or bumps at speed that unload the rear wheel. With no rebound damping out back, the rear spring unloads...uhh...quickly.

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Old 05-07-2013, 10:26 PM   #76428
ER70S-2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ER70S-2 View Post
About the rider/static sag: it's been said the initial DR shock linkage has a high mechanical advantage and will allow more rider sag than one might expect.
Quote:
Originally Posted by procycle View Post
That was always assumed but doesn't turn out to be the case. The DR has a relatively flat linkage ratio.
Care to comment on the initial sag feeling so soft? Are other bikes similar? (I won't repeat the myth)

Quote:
Originally Posted by procycle View Post
You might find this interesting
--> http://drriders.com/topic8180.html
I measured the actual shock travel and calculated the linkage leverage ratios.
That's a cool bunch of info, thanks for taking the time to photo and post.
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Quote:
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"BTW, I don't do style. It's a dirt bike, not some girlie dress-up thing." -
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Old 05-08-2013, 02:50 AM   #76429
yegdod1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JagLite View Post
Uh, what is it you need?
The retainer seal?


I am pretty sure you mean you want the retainer FOR the countershaft seal.
ProCycle sells one but why not get one that is already in Australia?
Vic Strang sells them:
http://www.vincestrangmotorcycles.com.au/dr650.html
(near the bottom of the page in the "Chains/sprockets section)
From what I have read here, Suzuki dealers can get the new factory version now in Australia.
I have one on order here in the USA to see if we can get them yet.
Thats what i meant...oooops......
Thanks for the info..
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Old 05-08-2013, 06:03 AM   #76430
Rusty Rocket
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kommando View Post
I just have springs rated for my 200lb, and the main time I notice poor suspension is riding humps or bumps at speed that unload the rear wheel. With no rebound damping out back, the rear spring unloads...uhh...quickly.

Pogo stick comes to mind. I was trying to keep up in whoops with my 2 buddies who were riding TE610's and I was good for 1 whoop. If I had 2 hit 2 in a row, it started to get dangerous. Cogent solved that. Now I have 30 clicks of rebound adjustment and the rear stays where it oughtta.
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Old 05-08-2013, 06:28 AM   #76431
Bronco638
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ER70S-2
The travel changes from 10.2" to 8.7" front and rear.
This got me to thinking, so I measured my travel when I got home. On the front, I measured from the tire to the area between the four bolts that hold the fender to the lower triple. I measured 6.5". The rear just measures under 9", as it should. How did I lose 2" of travel on the front? The forks have been lowered per the shop manual. ???? I have much confusion.
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Old 05-08-2013, 06:59 AM   #76432
newride
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kommando View Post
Just be sure to set the engine to true TDC before removing the CCT. I do this by rotating the back wheel in 5th with a sparkplug taken out. You'll feel the air rush out of the cylinder as the piston approaches TDC. Do NOT rotate the engine once you start to remove the CCT. The cam chain could skip teeth on the timing sprockets if it's too loose.

Retract the CCT fully BEFORE trying to reinstall it. It should click into it's retracted and locked position. Once you have it fully bolted in, release it.

I used RTV high-temp gasket-maker, after scraping off the OEM gasket with some gasket remover chemical. My CCT hasn't leaked in over 10K miles now.
Thanks Kommando. Instead of turning the back wheel to TDC, can I do it the old fashion way of turning the flywheel with a wrench like when doing the valves? any difference?
Thanks!
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Old 05-08-2013, 07:13 AM   #76433
kbuckey
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For what it's worth, my experience was I was pretty happy with the stock setup. IWeighed aobut 165. I did put on a fork brace which I think improves feel on the street. I then tried the Intiminators, which improved the forks, but made the rear feel wimpy. So I got a Wilburs, and it has a slightly stiffer spring as well.

Ooh, that felt good, but now my forks seemed a little soft. I know the Intiminator guy said not to do stiffer springs. Anyway, with stiffer springs all is good. I actually lost some weight myself (155) and with a bare bike it's just a little firm, but loaded down for trips it is just about perfect.

Oh, I, too, ride like the old man that I am.....
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Old 05-08-2013, 07:36 AM   #76434
Mongle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bronco638 View Post
The forks have been lowered per the shop manual.
I think you answered your own question.
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Old 05-08-2013, 07:44 AM   #76435
Mongle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kbuckey View Post
For what it's worth, my experience was I was pretty happy with the stock setup. IWeighed aobut 165. I did put on a fork brace which I think improves feel on the street. I then tried the Intiminators, which improved the forks, but made the rear feel wimpy. So I got a Wilburs, and it has a slightly stiffer spring as well.

Ooh, that felt good, but now my forks seemed a little soft. I know the Intiminator guy said not to do stiffer springs. Anyway, with stiffer springs all is good. I actually lost some weight myself (155) and with a bare bike it's just a little firm, but loaded down for trips it is just about perfect.

Oh, I, too, ride like the old man that I am.....

I haven't been 155 lbs since I was 15.

At 220 lbs the stock springs weren't going to make it. I put a 8.6 (I think) in the back. It is a little stiffer then I like but when I carry 70 lbs of gear it comes out right. I do have to do something about the whole rebound thing. Bucking bronco comes to mind. I was running about 30-40 mph down a dirt road and hit a washout area about 1.5ft deep. I didn't see it because I was looking at the cow hiding in the bushes waiting to jump out in front of me. I now realize he just liked watching that part of the road for the mayhem. I'm not sure how but the backend came up higher then the front end and I rode the front wheel probably 30 ft before things settled down. It was another 10 minutes before I settled down....
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Old 05-08-2013, 08:47 AM   #76436
procycle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ER70S-2 View Post
Care to comment on the initial sag feeling so soft? Are other bikes similar? (I won't repeat the myth)
The stock setup certainly feels that way. I think 3 factors contribute to that feeling.

Stock spring rate too soft
Too much sag with the factory settings
Way early contact with the bottoming bumper

I just took a bottoming bumper survey of the motorcycles hanging around here and in comparison the DR bottoming bumper is gigantic. My V-Strom bumper is about 1/3 the length. KTM200 and WR250R bumpers are about 2/3 as long but smaller diameter. The KTM990 bumper is about 1/2 the size.

Suzuki is obviously using the bumper as a major factor in suspension control rather then just using it to soften the jolt of bottoming out.

edit: I also posted this over in the DRriders thread as it's more pertinent to the discussion there.
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Old 05-08-2013, 10:23 AM   #76437
psmcd
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stock+speed=scarey

The first time I was on a gravel road with washboard I knew the stock suspension was going to put me in a ditch with what I consider normal riding style.[/QUOTE]

Gravel washboard, any kind of whoop plus brake dive on pavement set me on the upgrade path. Emulators and stiffer springs up front helped a lot. Garden chores have delayed installment of my Ohlin with 7.5 spring which I expect will be sufficient for my old man pace. If that doesn't eliminate the high speed wobbles (+55mph) on washboard then I'll consider a steering damper
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Old 05-08-2013, 11:32 AM   #76438
ER70S-2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by procycle View Post
The stock setup certainly feels that way. I think 3 factors contribute to that feeling.

Stock spring rate too soft
Too much sag with the factory settings
Way early contact with the bottoming bumper

I just took a bottoming bumper survey of the motorcycles hanging around here and in comparison the DR bottoming bumper is gigantic. My V-Strom bumper is about 1/3 the length. KTM200 and WR250R bumpers are about 2/3 as long but smaller diameter. The KTM990 bumper is about 1/2 the size.

Suzuki is obviously using the bumper as a major factor in suspension control rather then just using it to soften the jolt of bottoming out.

edit: I also posted this over in the DRriders thread as it's more pertinent to the discussion there.
I can live with that, thanks.

Bronco638:
Your answers are in Procycle's link. Looks like Suzuki is doing a little overenthusiactic marketing. Per Jeff's measurements, even if the shock bumper is squished down to 0mm thick, we can only get 10.24" of rear wheel travel.

For those interested in the numbers, Jeff included some useful information in his link.
http://drriders.com/topic8180.html
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Threewheelbonnie View Post
"BTW, I don't do style. It's a dirt bike, not some girlie dress-up thing." -

ER70S-2 screwed with this post 05-08-2013 at 11:38 AM
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Old 05-08-2013, 12:10 PM   #76439
belleringer
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carb screws

i had good luck using needle nose vise grips, the real vise grip brand ... heated with a heat gun, used blaster penetrating spray .... lots of it ... let it sit, heat and repeat ... they do crack a bit when they come loose, but they will come loose .... they throw them away and get stainless hex head bolts ... use some anti seize mixed with water proof grease, just a bit will do ...
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Old 05-08-2013, 12:37 PM   #76440
Mambo Dave
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Fork Springs question: I weigh 185 pounds.

For the cheap route - because I want to try it after having bought aftermarket fork springs for my last bike, then really thinking about it, their already shorter length, and why i jsut paid that much $ for a bike I wasn't going to race...

So how much should I cut off of the stock fork springs to give me and a usually unloaded bike the 'right' ride to avoid the brake dive and dives into corners? And if they're progressive, which end would you cut them from?
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