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Old 09-03-2013, 07:49 AM   #80911
eakins
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http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=916478
glad to see that center support used.

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Old 09-03-2013, 07:58 AM   #80912
newride
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trailrider383 View Post
People are always breaking those bolts off by over torquing. Blue Loctite and a short wrench. There is a little bit of play, that is normal.

The front axle pinch nuts/studs on the lower right front fork slider are also common to over torque and snap off the studs.
Yes. I don't always trust a torque wrench for small things. I am pretty good at Feeling bolt tension. Never had a bolt back out.
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Old 09-03-2013, 08:03 AM   #80913
Foot dragger
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ER70S-2 View Post
I didn't want to clutter up the DR Picture thread, so............................


I start answering your question about half way down the page in the link (and one post above where the link is pointing ). Please note that I jump around from Cogent's shock to RT Emulators to Cogent's DDCs and back again.

http://drriders.com/post102621.html#p102621
I know the current "thing" on here is to buy the DDC's to replace those darn emulators.

But,the Emulators are fully tunable and work fine,once dialed in for your use they can be made to work great. Trying to dial in bike suspension when the bike gets used,for rocks/fireroads/smooth trails/pavement,like many dualsport bikes get used for, is a little tricky to say the least.
Especially with some of the cheapest forks known to man.
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Old 09-03-2013, 08:22 AM   #80914
UberKul
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Joined: Feb 2007
Location: Wilseyville, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillMoore View Post
Been thinking a lot about my helmet after today's get-off... Here is a picture of the damage to the helmet:



I hit hard enough that I was aware of the hit, but not so hard that it hurt or anything. So is this helmet done?
I'd still use it. Problem is you'll always have it in the back of your head (literally) this thing is might leave me brain dead in a big off. Looks like it was a glancing blow to the paint and no real damage to the shell.
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Old 09-03-2013, 08:27 AM   #80915
GSF1200S
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Location: Austin, Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by acesandeights View Post
+1 I really look like a moroon turning around. I've got short legs and it doesn't take much to get both legs kicking in the air looking for terra firma when turning around (especially when having to back up).
You're not alone. I'm 5'11", but with a 32 inseam. I keep the bike stock height. If either wheel is in a rut, sand, mud, etc, I have to dismount to turn it around. I rarely drop it moving. Its always at a stop trying to turn the oinker around..
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Old 09-03-2013, 08:28 AM   #80916
BillMoore
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Good input on the helmet. This wasn't its first hit, but definitely the hardest, so I think I'll replace it. I got 2.5 years out of it, which isn't bad for a helmet that only cost me $140...
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Old 09-03-2013, 08:56 AM   #80917
DockingPilot
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the DR650 thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Foot dragger View Post
Especially with some of the cheapest forks known to man.
I think that honor belongs to the F800 Beemer. Complete rubbish.
Lol


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Old 09-03-2013, 10:06 AM   #80918
Adv Grifter
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Location: Passing ADV Stalkers in California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newride View Post
Finally got the front sprocket on with new bolts and the old retaining plate. It indicates to torque the bolts at 4.5 lbs. Really? anyway. don't have an adapter (looked in man hardware stores in the area) to torgue bolts that small. So I decided to do it by feel. It seems that the bolts on go so far in anyway due to their structure. Made them snug but not crazy tight. There is a little play back and forth of the sprocket. Is that normal?

http://s704.photobucket.com/user/new...tml?sort=3&o=1
Doing it by feel is fine ... if you've done this sort of thing before. The key here is using a bit of BLUE LOC TITE on the bolts. This way, the bolts do not need to be all that tight. The Loc Tite will hold all secure.

The plate fits into slots, then turns to lock in place once bolts are in.
And YES ... slight sprocket movement is NORMAL.

Do you have the sprocket facing the "right way" ?
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Old 09-03-2013, 10:17 AM   #80919
ER70S-2
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Location: SE Denver-ish
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Foot dragger View Post
I know the current "thing" on here is to buy the DDC's to replace those darn emulators.

But,the Emulators are fully tunable and work fine,once dialed in for your use they can be made to work great. Trying to dial in bike suspension when the bike gets used,for rocks/fireroads/smooth trails/pavement,like many dualsport bikes get used for, is a little tricky to say the least.
Especially with some of the cheapest forks known to man.
I agree completely and tried to make that point. From my DRRiders post "I removed a known good suspension upgrade with a long history of success, on a whim."

I try not to encourage the many riders that must have the newest and best of anything that appears on the internet, whether they can afford it or not.

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Old 09-03-2013, 10:19 AM   #80920
motolab
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adv Grifter View Post
I would let a PRO do this for you .... and pay close attention so you can do it correctly next time.
Why not buy a chain press or chain press plates for your breaker/riveter?

Regards,

Derek
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Old 09-03-2013, 10:49 AM   #80921
newride
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adv Grifter View Post
Doing it by feel is fine ... if you've done this sort of thing before. The key here is using a bit of BLUE LOC TITE on the bolts. This way, the bolts do not need to be all that tight. The Loc Tite will hold all secure.

The plate fits into slots, then turns to lock in place once bolts are in.
And YES ... slight sprocket movement is NORMAL.

Do you have the sprocket facing the "right way" ?
yes, the raised side towards the bike.
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Old 09-03-2013, 11:03 AM   #80922
Adv Grifter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by motolab View Post
Why not buy a chain press or chain press plates for your breaker/riveter?

Regards,

Derek
A good chain tool certainly makes the job easier ... but I've seen inexperienced guys TOTALLY screw up despite the good chain tools. It's still technique and experience at the front and knowing HOW TO USE those tools.

Nothing wrong with taking a lesson from an expert first time around ... and avoid the several caveats on the next go-round.
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Old 09-03-2013, 11:10 AM   #80923
Foot dragger
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DockingPilot View Post
I think that honor belongs to the F800 Beemer. Complete rubbish.
Lol


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Maybe,I had an 07 Triumph Scrambler,figured out it had the same forks as a bottom of the barrel Harley,easily the crappiest modern fork Ive tried,flexed like rubber under braking enough to where I would have to stop and kick them straight.
Kicked/juddered and banged over most any bump.

But a nice looking bike.
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Old 09-03-2013, 11:18 AM   #80924
Foot dragger
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adv Grifter View Post
A good chain tool certainly makes the job easier ... but I've seen inexperienced guys TOTALLY screw up despite the good chain tools. It's still technique and experience at the front and knowing HOW TO USE those tools.

Nothing wrong with taking a lesson from an expert first time around ... and avoid the several caveats on the next go-round.
Many of us have installed master links for years,and we have our own technique that works.

For a newbie,maybe googling a video of it,and trying it with one or two spare masterlinks would be the thing to do.

I make sure the plate is on far enough so the clip will fit,then I line it up just so,and pop it in place with a straight tap from a sharp screwdriver,it has to be pushed on straight,maybe finished with vice grips.

Its one thing that if done wrong might last a while but can fly off when you least expect it.

Always,Always,have a spare masterlink in the kit on the bike,one that fits your chain preferably.
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Old 09-03-2013, 11:24 AM   #80925
motolab
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adv Grifter View Post
A good chain tool certainly makes the job easier ... but I've seen inexperienced guys TOTALLY screw up despite the good chain tools. It's still technique and experience at the front and knowing HOW TO USE those tools.
Using a chain press mostly eliminates the possibility of pressing the plate on crooked, so that leaves over- or under-pressing. This can be avoided by pressing in small increments once nearly home and measuring frequently with a caliper (the goal being that the width matches the adjacent links).

Regards,

Derek
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