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Old 04-03-2010, 01:37 PM   #8356
jharrell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shekmark
Tell me about that Zard exhaust. I've been thinking of one of those as
a replacement to the stock exhaust.
How loud is it. Difficulty of the install. Does it require a rejet of the carbs.?

Thanks
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Old 04-03-2010, 01:40 PM   #8357
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sail121j
I have just bought a 'new' 2008 Scrambler and love it.. My only complaint is the brutal heat from the exhaust on my right leg. I am 6' 4" and not sure if it is my leg length that makes it worse or not. After riding, I can't even come close to leaving my hand on the leg protection for the pipes. I have tried to read all 500+ pages of this forum to see if there are any bright solutions or some kind of wearable heat shield for the right leg but all I have found is random noise about the heat with some folks and some with no problems. The AI is still installed but haven't seen anything that says it makes a lot of difference to the exhaust heat. Riding down the road with my right leg in the wind is not my idea of comfort.
Help....
Removing the Air Injection on my 2008 did cool the pipes down a bit.
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Old 04-03-2010, 02:13 PM   #8358
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beach40
Some have fitted a cross bar to join the gap underneath, but thats not really going to do much. In fact it will probably do more harm as it means both bars will bend in a fall.
You're wrong on that. I had a tube made to fit across the gap and I made sure it fits from bend to bend so that there's a lot of overlap.
Now, whilst I haven't had the misfortune to have tested it like this, it makes the bars impossible to flex by hand whereas before it was possible to push them back to the cases, which is what happens in a fall. Don't forget that, with the cross tube fitted, you're not just trying to flex the mounting points on both bars but you're also trying to bend two 5/8" tubes.
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Old 04-03-2010, 02:21 PM   #8359
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beach40
I've had a few fabricators look at them and they all agree they don't offer any protection
Actually you're wrong on this too. You see, when they fold back against the cases, it's the crash bars that do the scraping down the road, thus protecting the cases. Much like the bars on my BMW R100GS used to do against the rocker covers. Then when everything stops scraping and sparking down the road, just kick them straight and start again.
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Old 04-03-2010, 02:26 PM   #8360
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the only gs's I'd see using are the old 100 or 80, but I need to ride it to see how they do. the oilheads no way. EFI is cool but I agree that carbs have that reliability..... I'm going to do a test ride next weekend at a triumph truck not too far from me to see about how not fast they are. I get a bit nervous going away from stock for durability, but the lure of more power....but that's also not what it's so much about....I am not so sure about the high altitude power, though - me and the all the gear on hte bike will be 150 kilos/330lbs easy - at 12000 feet you still need to accellerate. carb jetting? efi auto adjust? so long as the power is there, I'll waste the fuel....just want to konw that hte power will be there. the overall basic-ness of the bike is part of the appeal - why I liked the cb750 and the zrx as well....but they are more road-only.....
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Old 04-03-2010, 02:27 PM   #8361
blacktiger
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maxacceleration
I don't recall bt.
I'll have to dig out the paperwork, if I even kept it.
I did ask to set up these shocks for 190 lbs ready to ride.
Not for track or high speed riding.
These shocks are plush solo, although I get fairly easy bottoming two up.
I don't change the shock settings every time as thats a pain and I ride two up only occasionally. FWIW
OK if you can find it I'd like to know. Mine seem to ride a bit harsh with the 20kgs/cm springs.
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Old 04-03-2010, 02:32 PM   #8362
blacktiger
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steelsculptor
at 12000 feet you still need to accellerate. carb jetting? efi auto adjust?
At any altitude you can only burn fuel according to the amount of oxygen available. An efi system will adjust automatically to get the most efficient mixture. And, as for reliability of carbs, it's actually the other way round. efi is far more reliable these days.
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Old 04-03-2010, 03:19 PM   #8363
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sail121j
I have just bought a 'new' 2008 Scrambler and love it.. My only complaint is the brutal heat from the exhaust on my right leg. I am 6' 4" and not sure if it is my leg length that makes it worse or not. After riding, I can't even come close to leaving my hand on the leg protection for the pipes. I have tried to read all 500+ pages of this forum to see if there are any bright solutions or some kind of wearable heat shield for the right leg but all I have found is random noise about the heat with some folks and some with no problems. The AI is still installed but haven't seen anything that says it makes a lot of difference to the exhaust heat. Riding down the road with my right leg in the wind is not my idea of comfort.
Help....
I'm the same height as you, and on my '10 Scrammy I can feel some heat through my jeans...after close to 100 miles of riding, and only if I'm sitting at one of the thousands of red lights here, and at about 80 degrees outside. It's not hot enough to be uncomfortable, just enough to know the engine's doing something. I want to think it's no worse than what I felt on my Thruxton. If anything, I find the location of the front most heat shield to be more annoying. Almost like it's too far forward, the outturned tip on it's rear edge resting on inside of my calf.

Note: I still have less than 300 miles on the bike and have only had it for less than a week, so I can't really say too much more on it's comforts than that. I'm hoping to do an Iron Butt in a few weeks (work permitting, so I'll be able to say more after that.
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Old 04-03-2010, 03:49 PM   #8364
davevv
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sail121j
I have just bought a 'new' 2008 Scrambler and love it.. My only complaint is the brutal heat from the exhaust on my right leg. I am 6' 4" and not sure if it is my leg length that makes it worse or not. After riding, I can't even come close to leaving my hand on the leg protection for the pipes. I have tried to read all 500+ pages of this forum to see if there are any bright solutions or some kind of wearable heat shield for the right leg but all I have found is random noise about the heat with some folks and some with no problems. The AI is still installed but haven't seen anything that says it makes a lot of difference to the exhaust heat. Riding down the road with my right leg in the wind is not my idea of comfort.
Help....
It is truly curious how this affects some people and not others. I ride an '06 nearly every day, AI removed, and never notice any heat on my leg. I'm 6'0" and normally ride with my leg touching the heat shield. Is your leg actually on the shield, or does leg length cause it to be forward of the shield and against the pipe? There is such a large gap between that shield and the pipes that the headers would have to be really hot to cause that kind of problem.

Removing the AI should make a difference to the exhaust heat. It's whole purpose is to burn off excess fuel in the headers which is going to raise their temperature. Most people who remove it do so to cut down on the bluing of the headers that is caused by the higher heat.

BTW, my son rides an '06 as well and he has never mentioned a heat problem either. That bike still has the AI installed and he is 6'4" with a 36" inseam.
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Old 04-03-2010, 04:00 PM   #8365
davevv
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steelsculptor
the only gs's I'd see using are the old 100 or 80, but I need to ride it to see how they do. the oilheads no way. EFI is cool but I agree that carbs have that reliability..... I'm going to do a test ride next weekend at a triumph truck not too far from me to see about how not fast they are. I get a bit nervous going away from stock for durability, but the lure of more power....but that's also not what it's so much about....I am not so sure about the high altitude power, though - me and the all the gear on hte bike will be 150 kilos/330lbs easy - at 12000 feet you still need to accellerate. carb jetting? efi auto adjust? so long as the power is there, I'll waste the fuel....just want to konw that hte power will be there. the overall basic-ness of the bike is part of the appeal - why I liked the cb750 and the zrx as well....but they are more road-only.....
With your level of concern about riding at altitude, I'd definitely go with EFI over carbs. Better performance with less hassle, and I can't think of any reports of problems with the Bonnie/Scrambler EFI system.

The Scrambler is only an off-road bike if you're an old guy like me. It looks the part to me because that's what we had in the sixties. We used bikes like that for everything. They got the job done then, and still will, but they certainly aren't the equal of today's dualsports if you're off road.

With upgraded suspension bits, the Scrambler should be perfectly capable of RTW travel and you won't find many more reliable bikes anywhere.
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davevv screwed with this post 04-03-2010 at 04:05 PM
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Old 04-03-2010, 04:22 PM   #8366
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blacktiger
Actually you're wrong on this too. You see, when they fold back against the cases, it's the crash bars that do the scraping down the road, thus protecting the cases. Much like the bars on my BMW R100GS used to do against the rocker covers. Then when everything stops scraping and sparking down the road, just kick them straight and start again.
Thats what I was thinking,maybe put some thin dense padding on the inside of the crash bar and they fold in on impact and dont hurt the case any. As long as they keep the case off the ground in a tip over their doing the job. My V-strom has the Pat walsh skidplate/crash bar set up on it. Its huge and heavy. Im sure it works but must weigh 18 lbs and is gawdawful ugly. I just dont spend enough time off road with a scrambler or a strom to have all that hardware bolted on it. Little bit of protection is ok though.
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Old 04-03-2010, 05:05 PM   #8367
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Foot dragger
Thats what I was thinking,maybe put some thin dense padding on the inside of the crash bar and they fold in on impact and dont hurt the case any. As long as they keep the case off the ground in a tip over their doing the job. My V-strom has the Pat walsh skidplate/crash bar set up on it. Its huge and heavy. Im sure it works but must weigh 18 lbs and is gawdawful ugly. I just dont spend enough time off road with a scrambler or a strom to have all that hardware bolted on it. Little bit of protection is ok though.
Me again.... Once again that genius Grizzlybear I think has made some rubbing strips/crash bungs that bolt to his cases when he has his bike in SM mode, the pictures are again somewhere (not too far this time I think) back in this thread. Some clever fellow I am sure could develop some bolt on/glue on case savers for the Scrambler just like a lot of the enduro bike now have...Calling Grizz Obviously they need to be low profile to prevent them from digging in.

Cheers

Adie
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Old 04-03-2010, 06:18 PM   #8368
Foot dragger
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davevv
It is truly curious how this affects some people and not others. I ride an '06 nearly every day, AI removed, and never notice any heat on my leg. I'm 6'0" and normally ride with my leg touching the heat shield. Is your leg actually on the shield, or does leg length cause it to be forward of the shield and against the pipe? There is such a large gap between that shield and the pipes that the headers would have to be really hot to cause that kind of problem.

Removing the AI should make a difference to the exhaust heat. It's whole purpose is to burn off excess fuel in the headers which is going to raise their temperature. Most people who remove it do so to cut down on the bluing of the headers that is caused by the higher heat.

BTW, my son rides an '06 as well and he has never mentioned a heat problem either. That bike still has the AI installed and he is 6'4" with a 36" inseam.
Im 6ft even, and the double heat shielded pipe makes a good leg rest for me anyway,I notice the pipe/heat shield sticking out and it gets slightly warm but once under way I pretty much forget about it.
I may get a 2 into 1 low pipe someday just to make the bike skinnier but may have to win the lotto first. The AI is removed on mine by the way.
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Old 04-03-2010, 07:07 PM   #8369
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blacktiger
Actually you're wrong on this too. You see, when they fold back against the cases, it's the crash bars that do the scraping down the road, thus protecting the cases. Much like the bars on my BMW R100GS used to do against the rocker covers. Then when everything stops scraping and sparking down the road, just kick them straight and start again.
I can see your reasoning, but personally I'm not placing a lot of faith in them. In a low speed tip they would definitely be better than nothing and may well provide some protection in something more serious.

In your example of scraping down the road I reckon they would part company pretty quick. Heres hoping none of us ever have the opportunity to prove it one way or the other...
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Old 04-03-2010, 09:07 PM   #8370
shekmark
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jharrell
Tell me about that Zard exhaust. I've been thinking of one of those as
a replacement to the stock exhaust.
How loud is it. Difficulty of the install. Does it require a rejet of the carbs.?

Thanks
The Zard cross is very loud. I'm trying to quiet it and have not been successful. It sounds really good but not for long rides/ Maybe I'm just getting old. It requires a big rejet. It was easy to install but you can forget about support unless you speak Italian. Buy an Arrow or I will sell you this one.
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