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Old 06-09-2010, 09:19 AM   #9541
ivara
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Location: Norway
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nofate
On my last fillup I calculated I was getting 23.02 km/l , so the 16 liter tank would give me a 368 km range.
Only that, with the single petcock, those last 2-3 litres left on the right side of the frame tube is hard to reach... Most I ever have filled up on my Bonnie is 13.5 litres.
(in a pinch, I guess one could pull the seat, then loosen the 2 tank bolts to tip the tank to the left to make sure the last drops found their way over to the left side)
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Old 06-09-2010, 09:56 AM   #9542
Foot dragger
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Location: chico,just below rag dump(nor-cal)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MCole
You must get much better mileage than I do because an extra two gallons wouldn't have cut it. Hell, I've hit reserve at under 100 miles going at highway speeds. I even brought an extra gallon in a leftover bag of joe from Dunkin Donunts so I had 5 extra gallons and used just about all of it. Labrador is not the place to run out of gas, especially when the bears have just come out of hibernation Running at higher revs for better traction on the gravel as well as the 3 hours it took to go through 50km of construction probably reduced my overall mileage a bit but I think you'd be crazy to go up being too optimistic about range.
Higher revs for better traction,Ive never heard that one. I'll have to try keeping my Scrambler pinned for traction next time out. I have yet to go less then 135 to reserve on the bike yet. Higher revs does eat gas pretty fast usually.
Putting a big gas tank on the very back of the bike just seems like an ill handling concept as luggage and what not already goes towards the back also but it must work ok. My DR650 becomes more of a wobbling pig with my camping/traveling gear on the back,tail swinging the dog effect.
The Scrambler just doesnt seem like a long trip sort of bike with its tiny range and no wind protection and minimal suspension and tubed tires.

I'll probably use it for long trips anyway.
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Old 06-09-2010, 10:01 AM   #9543
Foot dragger
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Location: chico,just below rag dump(nor-cal)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BiganDaft
I've Eventually got the Scrambler back after getting the 21" front and 18" back rims laced up and fitted with new shoes, and still have a problem that I was hoping the new rims would solve.

On one of my rides I managed to put a small dent into the OEM front rim.
I noticed that I had picked up a bit of a head shake (this is at low and high speed, when I take my hands off the handle bars).

Well the shake is still there, I went past my dealer and checked the steering head bearing but they seem to be okay.

Any suggestions?

the bike is set up as follows:
Icon Fork inserts from Norman Hyde
Icon rear shocks from Norman Hyde
Front Wheel: 90/90 21 Sun rim with Metzeler Enduro3 Sahara
Rear Wheel: 140/80 18 Sun rim with Metzeler Endro3 Sahara
I have the standard Triumph screen.
The Icon rear shocks I put on my R75/6 were rigid as boards,I found out later thats not un common.
They look like old Koni's but the ones I had didnt work at all. The informed me there was no gaurantee and that both halves were mine.
Yours work fine?
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Old 06-09-2010, 11:29 AM   #9544
bross
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Location: Osoyoos, BC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wiseanhyzer
Hmmmm...


I've never changed a motorcycle tire myself. I think I need to give it a try shortly based on the experiences you guys are posting here. It doesn't look like any fun. I was going to buy 3 tire irons to add to the tool roll for traveling. Any tips for breaking the bead?
The first one seems like an impossible task and you'll sweat, swear and throw things. 2nd one, not so much, and by the third you'll be wondering what all the fuss was about. There's lots of good youtube tutorials on changing tires, watch them several times and pay attention to the little tips the guys throw out and memorize those. After breaking a bead I think the best tip is to simply make sure that you have the part of the tire that you're *NOT* working on with your spoons in the middle or drop down portion of the wheel. That's what gives you the play/room to lever the tire over the rim. Also pay attention to where your valve stem is and where to start etc. as it can be tight around the valve so that can make it either easy or very hard with respect to moving the tire into the center or drop portion. Done right you should never have to force anything, if you're forcing it, step back and try to see what you're doing wrong.

Best to practice at home in the comfort of your garage with a milk crate or garbage can to work on, then for your second attempt, do it in your garage again but only use the tools you carry with you. You'll soon figure out what works and what doesn't and what you need to carry. Small baggie of baby powder helps to keep the tube from binding.
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Old 06-09-2010, 12:07 PM   #9545
Gormley Green
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Location: Squamish, BC, Canada
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A little ride...

Did my first long ride on the Scrambler. Put on 1200km over the weekend. Toronto-Dorset-Tobermory-Manitoulin Island-Toronto. Had a mix of hot sunny weather (28 C) and very cold heavy rain (9 C). Bike performed really well on paved and gravel, aside from my finding the seat a little bit hard had no issues at all. Seems to like to cruise at 95-105 km/h best, both in terms of gearing and fuel economy. Best I did (at least recorded) was 207km to 7.9L of fuel, or ~3.8L/100km, which by my math (no guarantees ) is 61.63 mpg.

Here's some pics of the Scram loaded up. Ventura rack and pack system, Triumph engine guards and skid plate, Triumph tank bag, and Dart flyscreen. Custom PVC fishing rod tube off the passenger peg.

MS Chi-Cheemaun ferry to Manitoulin Island. Hoping that truck has his brakes on...



A beach on Mindemoya Lake, Manitoulin Island. Bag on the back rack only has sleeping bag and Thermarest in it, so it's only about 2.5lbs, along with a 3lb tent:


Nice campsite on Lake Huron:
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Old 06-09-2010, 12:37 PM   #9546
Foot dragger
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Location: chico,just below rag dump(nor-cal)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bross
The first one seems like an impossible task and you'll sweat, swear and throw things. 2nd one, not so much, and by the third you'll be wondering what all the fuss was about. There's lots of good youtube tutorials on changing tires, watch them several times and pay attention to the little tips the guys throw out and memorize those. After breaking a bead I think the best tip is to simply make sure that you have the part of the tire that you're *NOT* working on with your spoons in the middle or drop down portion of the wheel. That's what gives you the play/room to lever the tire over the rim. Also pay attention to where your valve stem is and where to start etc. as it can be tight around the valve so that can make it either easy or very hard with respect to moving the tire into the center or drop portion. Done right you should never have to force anything, if you're forcing it, step back and try to see what you're doing wrong.

Best to practice at home in the comfort of your garage with a milk crate or garbage can to work on, then for your second attempt, do it in your garage again but only use the tools you carry with you. You'll soon figure out what works and what doesn't and what you need to carry. Small baggie of baby powder helps to keep the tube from binding.
Breaking the bead on a tire that has been running down the road is usually very easy,tire is warm and loose,the last one I did on the Triumph came loose with the first push of my foot. Practicing at home would be a great idea,getting the wheel back in the swingarm can be a bit of a trick. I carry a small spray bottle of soapy water and use it to clean my face shield and lube the tire for getting it off and on the rim. Patches for the worst case scenario are a good thing.
I use a small oil drum from the oil change shop to change tires on at home,much easier on my back then wrestling on the ground with the tire swap. Triumphs come with no tools so having the right wrenchs along is good also. I changed the Scrambler rear tire on the trunk of a junk car last road side change and that worked good,picnic tables or what ever to keep from working on the ground helps lots. Putting the spacers back on the rt sides is a real good thing,they look similar on the Scrambler but are different thickness,wheel wont turn when tightened if they are switched.
I know this for fact as Ive done it. Not losing spacers and keeping the axle clean while its out is important. Carrying thick latex gloves,maybe 3 pair, is way better then turning your hands greasy black while working on dirty parts. Rags be good also. Patience is the most important thing,just settle in and do it and take a break if it gets out of hand.
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Old 06-09-2010, 12:47 PM   #9547
Foot dragger
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Location: chico,just below rag dump(nor-cal)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maxacceleration
I have test loaded my bike to the gills for next weeks Hells Canyon gathering.
Maybe up to five hundred miles of dirt/logging/fire roads etc. (!!! Yikes!!!)
With 350 miles to & from.

My support has eliminated downward movement when loading the rack.
Still there is a side to side rocking action as the seat is only located by a tongue in front, two hooks in the center and two bolts at the rear.
The front tongue and the two center hooks do not stabilize the seat in any way.
Its a floater!
Weight does plant the seat somewhat, but still...

Rhoadies & Grizzlies weld on bosses are truly the only way to solidify the stock rack IMO.
I didn't want to weld on bosses though.

I too am needing a 200 mile range.
I will post up in the next couple of days, when I get another fabbed up piece back...
Two rotopax 1 gal containers will be on my bike.

(Maybe I should just get a KTM lol )

Sorry for the long wind...
I did 400 miles of mostly easy dirt road on my knobby tired DR650 last week end,some nice 3+ ft deep water crossings,endless tight corners,lots of sliding around with a semi loaded bike,we werent camping so not too heavy a load. I was still pretty whipped on monday just from the 8 to 9 hour days on the bike.
It was a blast! We saw a 20 lb bear cub and much beautiful scenery close to the north coast. The Triumph would have been a great work out but hate to get it all dirty and I dont think it would have liked the 13 water crossings,my ft fender was under water on the DR and there were lots of rocks under water to make it interesting.
Take some good pics on your ride!
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Old 06-09-2010, 12:47 PM   #9548
Mista Vern
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Great tips, Foot Dragger!
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Old 06-09-2010, 12:49 PM   #9549
Mista Vern
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gormley Green


A beach on Mindemoya Lake, Manitoulin Island. Bag on the back rack only has sleeping bag and Thermarest in it, so it's only about 2.5lbs, along with a 3lb tent:


Looks like a great trip! I hope someday before I die I will get to see warm weather and blue skies again.
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Old 06-09-2010, 01:16 PM   #9550
CatCow
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Location: Portland, OR
Oddometer: 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoaringDS
The single seat is only rated for 11lbs...(4 gal tank @~10lbs/gal?!?!)
Gas is more like 6-6.2 lbs/gal, diesel about a pound more.(tanker truck driver ) But then of course that depends on how much the tank itself weighs.

But the weight issue has me interested. I'm going to be picking up a green Scrambler as soon as it arrives at the dealership(it's on a truck somewhere headed this way, supposed to arrive on Friday), and I've been wondering what to do about the seat/rack issue. I was thinking of getting the solo seat, depending on what I think of the stock seat after riding it a while. The solo seat upgrades look like they work well, but what is the weight capacity of the luggage racks that go with the stock seat? I have a Givi V46 that I want to use for all my junk when commuting to work(short drive, but Oregon can be a bit soggy at times).
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Old 06-09-2010, 01:23 PM   #9551
thistle66
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blacktiger, you make me happy to see someone else with Arrow headers that are turning the same colour shades as mine. I can stop worrying needlessly about my carbs being gunky or summin'.


Quote:
Originally Posted by blacktiger

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Old 06-09-2010, 01:41 PM   #9552
blacktiger
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Location: St.Leonards on Sea, England.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thistle66
blacktiger, you make me happy to see someone else with Arrow headers that are turning the same colour shades as mine. I can stop worrying needlessly about my carbs being gunky or summin'.
Well you say you can stop worrying but I get the feeling that my bike is running hot. I told the dealer at the 12K service but they couldn't find anything out of order. It puzzles me that other bikes have a nice straw colour on their headers.
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Old 06-09-2010, 02:14 PM   #9553
Maxacceleration
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Location: Wa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Foot dragger
I did 400 miles of mostly easy dirt road on my knobby tired DR650 last week end,some nice 3+ ft deep water crossings,endless tight corners,lots of sliding around with a semi loaded bike,we werent camping so not too heavy a load. I was still pretty whipped on monday just from the 8 to 9 hour days on the bike.
I intend to have my bottle of Advil for sure.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Foot dragger
Take some good pics on your ride!
I hope to!

What I intend to do is, show up at camp all geared up and then strip my bike and leave all gear at camp, giving me an unburdened bike to explore on.
I'm still trimming down gear. Darned PNW weather this year demands too much riding gear...
I shouldn't have to take my electric jacket & gloves in June lol.
I kinda blew it getting the large MotoFizz tailbag.

Hopefully I will get to this hillside on my Scrambler.
I can only hope!


(stolen from trip route planner - thanks 650x)
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Sounds dangerous.
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Old 06-09-2010, 02:53 PM   #9554
Grizzlybear
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Location: Noosa, Australia
Oddometer: 514
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gormley Green
Here's some pics of the Scram loaded up. Ventura rack and pack system, Triumph engine guards and skid plate, Triumph tank bag, and Dart flyscreen. Custom PVC fishing rod tube off the passenger peg.

A beach on Mindemoya Lake, Manitoulin Island. Bag on the back rack only has sleeping bag and Thermarest in it, so it's only about 2.5lbs, along with a 3lb tent:


Nice campsite on Lake Huron:
Hey GG, you sure know how to sell the sizzle... those pics remind me of why I purchased the Scrambler in the beginning... sigh! I'll just do my camping trips vicariously through your posts so keep 'em coming!
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Old 06-09-2010, 03:00 PM   #9555
thistle66
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blacktiger
Well you say you can stop worrying but I get the feeling that my bike is running hot. I told the dealer at the 12K service but they couldn't find anything out of order. It puzzles me that other bikes have a nice straw colour on their headers.
Here's mine. Light reflections are obscuring some of the dark patchiness similar to your headers. Dark/purply (with wee bits of blue) right by the cylinders. I have no idea what that kinda colouration signifies

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