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Old 11-29-2011, 12:32 PM   #14326
Brunow - 007
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Holy cr*p there are some nice vid's on youtube.



ps: strikemaster welcome to the club... (even if i'm not yet in it )
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Old 11-29-2011, 01:13 PM   #14327
Georgios
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I test rode a Scram yesterday at my local dealer and I was quite impressed .I really like it.

But I noticed an unpleasant vibration at slightly above 2000 rpm and below, when you close the throttle with gear engaged before stopping at a light. On the other ranges the engine is completely smooth.

Is that common on a Scrambler?

Best wishes
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Old 11-30-2011, 01:30 PM   #14328
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Thanks Brunow. Georges, in my 400 miles experience I haven't noticed the vibrations you mention.

First impressions of my bike - easier to manhandle than my TDM, and its engine has similar characteristics but less bhp. On a couple of chilly, windy rides round N Wales and not wanting to wring its neck whilst still running in I found the power to be a bit low and the bike a bit unstable in x-winds. My bike is absolutely stock except for the Krauser - perhaps that didn't help!

MPG is better than I thought it would be but I have spoiled the bike with Shell V-Power only so far. Will try to do another 200 miles next week after I'm back from my next trip (airline pilot - giggity) so I can get the 1st service done. The standard headlamp is RUBBISH!

Handling on the stock suspension seems pretty basic and the rear shocks need to go in the bin!

Planned mods - LOW exhaust 2/1, the other Krauser mounting, fork springs, shocks, maybe Givi screen.

Still ploughing through this thread, up to page 300 so far!

Off to Phoenix now, hope to visit a few Triumph dealers including Go-Az.
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Old 12-01-2011, 03:38 AM   #14329
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brunow - 007 View Post


Yeah it grows on you! If it just was a bit lighter!

Kiwi wanker.
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Old 12-01-2011, 08:00 AM   #14330
Georgios
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Hi Strikem.,

I also noticed the limitation of the rear shocks, but wonder if those aftermarket parts are much better. You simply have only 105 mm of travel and that is not much. BTW, I felt the front fork is quite good for my taste.

The engine vibs are probably an exception of my testbike, I suppose.

What I also disliked was the absence of a centerstand (should be included to a pricy bike like the Scram), the non-lockable fuel cap, this weak front brake and the impossibility to reach the oil filler cap.

Besides that, it is a nice bike, which is, with over 9000,- Euros far too expensive here.
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Old 12-01-2011, 08:02 AM   #14331
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Originally Posted by Mud Lightspeed View Post
I have a setup I don't use anymore. I would sell it to ya. If you are tight for cash I could lend it you. I am in Calgary which is on your way north.
PM sent.
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Old 12-01-2011, 08:10 AM   #14332
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Originally Posted by Georgios View Post
Hi Strikem.,

I also noticed the limitation of the rear shocks, but wonder if those aftermarket parts are much better. You simply have only 105 mm of travel and that is not much. BTW, I felt the front fork is quite good for my taste.

The engine vibs are probably an exception of my testbike, I suppose.

What I also disliked was the absence of a centerstand (should be included to a pricy bike like the Scram), the non-lockable fuel cap, this weak front brake and the impossibility to reach the oil filler cap.

Besides that, it is a nice bike, which is, with over 9000,- Euros far too expensive here.
I must be in the minority because I'm actually OK with the suspension, at least so far. I suppose if I put luggage on the bike I may find I've overloaded it in the rear, which could be a good reason for new springs there. I don't go off-road so I don't have an issue with the fork.

Agree about the C-stand. Every Japanese bike I ever owned had a C-stand, this one should, too. The Triumph C-stand works very well, though, and while it's somewhat pricey ($200 US, not sure what it is in the UK and elsewhere) it's not outrageous. Triumph hasn't quite gotten to BMW-levels of insane pricing although they're getting closer every day.

The oil filler is a minor nuisance but what I did was that I have a long-shank screwdriver to unscrew it, and then a telescoping rod with a magnet on it to pick it up and then replace it. Works great.

No locking gas cap - yes, it astonishes me that Triumph will hit you up for over $8k for this bike and not put a locking gas cap on it. : Don't even get me started on the lack of a toolkit.

It saddens me sometimes to consider that the 1982 Kawasaki Spectre that I bought for $800 in 2007 is, in some ways, more sophisticated than the Scrambler I bought in 2009 for nearly $8k. The Kawi had cast wheels with tubeless tires, shaft drive, a center stand, a tach, a seat that was hinged on the side and locked with the ignition key, and a full (if somewhat cheap) tool kit.

So why is it that a modern British bike can't offer the same accoutrements that were standard for a mid-priced Japanese bike almost 30 years ago?
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Old 12-01-2011, 08:15 AM   #14333
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Originally Posted by ZappBranigan View Post
It saddens me sometimes to consider that the 1982 Kawasaki Spectre that I bought for $800 in 2007 is, in some ways, more sophisticated than the Scrambler I bought in 2009 for nearly $8k. The Kawi had cast wheels with tubeless tires, shaft drive, a center stand, a tach, a seat that was hinged on the side and locked with the ignition key, and a full (if somewhat cheap) tool kit.

So why is it that a modern British bike can't offer the same accoutrements that were standard for a mid-priced Japanese bike almost 30 years ago?
IMHO, You're missing the point of the bike.
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Old 12-01-2011, 08:38 AM   #14334
RMAK
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Originally Posted by Georgios View Post
the impossibility to reach the oil filler cap.
As Rocco Lampone said in The Godfather II, "Difficult, not impossible."
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Old 12-01-2011, 09:57 AM   #14335
Maxacceleration
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Originally Posted by DesmoTull View Post
IMHO, You're missing the point of the bike.
I agree. Retro is what it is. And knowing how to work with the bike you have.

I know my bike doesn't burn oil, so I check oil when its cold. A quarter turns the cap loose easily (maybe not with stock pipes?). A medium funnel rests in place well for the oil changes.
No issue.

WTF you need a locking gas cap for? I have never had anyone try to steal/siphon gas out of my bike in 35 years...
Its an inconvenience!

Tach? This bike has such easy power to use. You can't lug it or over rev it.
You can feel where to shift. Short shift it - its music to your ears.
Dirt bikes have tachs? You learn to ride it.
Look at chicks or scenery instead of your gauges!

Ya the centerstand... No argument there - it sucks.

I put Works shocks on my bike and I think they have close to an extra inch of travel themselves over the stock shocks.
Haven't touched the forks lol.
The bike doesn't have much travel, but what you have works ok. Pick a line...
If it had more travel y'all would be griping about seat height, right?

Oh, chain drive. The chain drive is a performance feature. Road racers use them. Dirt racers use them. They work the best with suspension.
You can change your gearing too.
Ya they need maintenance and get dirty with adv use.
Is your bike really a adv bike crossing continents? Not by most...

Get into your bikes... they go well.
Great modern retro.

Ok I'm in love with mine...

Whew
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Old 12-01-2011, 10:00 AM   #14336
Fire Escape
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Wink Can't or shouldn't?

Quote:
Originally Posted by ZappBranigan View Post
No locking gas cap - yes, it astonishes me that Triumph will hit you up for over $8k for this bike and not put a locking gas cap on it. : Don't even get me started on the lack of a toolkit.

It saddens me sometimes to consider that the 1982 Kawasaki Spectre that I bought for $800 in 2007 is, in some ways, more sophisticated than the Scrambler I bought in 2009 for nearly $8k. The Kawi had cast wheels with tubeless tires, shaft drive, a center stand, a tach, a seat that was hinged on the side and locked with the ignition key, and a full (if somewhat cheap) tool kit.

So why is it that a modern British bike can't offer the same accoutrements that were standard for a mid-priced Japanese bike almost 30 years ago?

I have no doubt that Triumph could have offered cast wheels, tubeless tires, shaft drive, etc. Looking at the rest of their bikes I think that most of what you mention is included somewhere. The question is more one of what should they have ofered.
For me the whole appeal of the Scrambler was to have a bike "like" what I didn't (but wanted to) have 35-40 years ago. Tubeless tires are always nice but don't work on 'normal' spoked wheels, those spoked wheels are very much the essance of a 60's bike, so ....
Shaft drive on a Scrambler? Perhaps if you were trying to build a RTW competitor to the GS but certainly not if you are re-creating a 1960's icon.
A center stand is certainly handy, but that hunk of iron was the first thing binned when one was thinking of going anywhere unpaved back in the day. The fact that it is available as an add-on allows todays rider to have it if wanted. If everyone wanted it, they'd probably make it standard.
I'd like to have a tach, the matching clocks seem iconic to me but realisticly, some bikes just don't need one. Way back then (as now) most 'desert sled' type bikes didn't have speedo's either but they are required for road use and needed to be included.
Most of the bikes from that era had hinged seats, Japanese bikes usually had locks, others did not. The hinges were really handy because we often needed to open them because something was loose or broken. Today, not so much, seats bolt on and hinge pins don't rattle and break. The only time I have 'needed' to get under the seat of my Scrambler was to remove the fuel tank to remove the AIS. I prefer not to have locks, had too many that would not unlock on seats. I don't care for locking gas caps either and would prefer that they be an option for those who have the need, seems like the one on my DR weighs 2 pounds, I'd love to bin it.
In the end, the Scrambler IS mostly a styling exercise, not a desert racer or RTW rider. Much like the bikes of the 60's, it is a Bonneville with a few changes to reflect the bikes of the past (and that improved 270 engine), which makes it just what I wanted, a bike that reminded me of the past without the reliability issues of it's "heritage". Well, except I'd like a headlght that worked, but someday I'll get to that.

If I wanted an '82 Kawasaki Spectre, I would not have even looked at the Scrambler they are different concepts in my mind.



Bruce
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Old 12-01-2011, 10:04 AM   #14337
Maxacceleration
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Originally Posted by Fire Escape View Post

Bruce
Wow same sentiment - different words!
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Horsepower is a distant second to useable torque, unless cafe cruising is the reason for the purchase...
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Sounds dangerous.
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Old 12-01-2011, 10:47 AM   #14338
RMAK
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Originally Posted by Fire Escape View Post
In the end, the Scrambler IS mostly a styling exercise,
OK, half empty guy, what modern bike isn't in part a styling exercise? I like to think of mine as a blank slate. I took it in a very retro direction with shrouded shocks, heritage badges, fake tank seam.etc. at first. Then I went a little in the adventure direction. Now I'm doing stripped down performance and lightening for fun. Expense was involved with each incarnation, but it's a lot cheaper than buying a new bike when one gets bored. I can attest that a couple of thou in engine and suspension mods and dumping 20 or so lbs. makes it a whole different ride.
After six years of production, for anyone to feel the need to point out that it's not a dirt bike seems to be mostly a redundancy exercise.
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Old 12-01-2011, 11:30 AM   #14339
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Don't get me wrong, I absolutely LOVE my Scrambler. I chose a 2008 deliberately because I didn't want the EFI and all of its associated complications. I appreciate simplicity when it comes to a bike. I love the classic look and feel of the bike, and it's an absolute hoot to ride.

Maybe I wasn't being clear - I wasn't bitching about the lack of those things on the Scrambler specifically, I was bitching about the niche-driven state of motorcycles in general.

No, I wouldn't want a shaft on my Scrambler (although when I'm cleaning oil off my spoked wheels I sometimes feel differently...) but my point is that many of the bikes of the early 80s were much more feature-laden than the bikes of today.

Cast wheels? That's a different story. I don't care if they don't look "period correct" or not, cast wheels would be a blessing because then I would have a tubeless tire that I could plug at the roadside. Not only that, tubeless is safer than a tube, which, if it gets a hole, will deflate all at once. I have seriously contemplated trading my Scrambler in for a Bonneville SE for this very reason, the only thing that has kept me from doing so (besides the fact that I am extremely cheap) is that I love the unique look and feel of the Scrambler and I know if I went to a more bland bike like the Bonnie, I'd miss the Scram in short order.

As for the twin clocks (which I understand the new Scrambler has?) and the crap-tastically stupid seat that is held in with two easy-to-strip allen bolts (my last Triumph, an '01 Thunderbird, had the same arrangement. Guess how I figured out the "easy to strip allen bolts" thing?) it's not as if this was a decision Triumph made in order to keep the "classic look" of the bike. It was done simply to save money and my complaint is that the Japanese were able to figure out how to put full instruments and a functional hinged seat on a bike in a cost-effective way 42 years ago with the CB-750, so there's no excuse - other than lazy corner-cutting - for Triumph not to be doing it now.

The no-toolkit thing irks me, too. Not that it matters - like most of us I have a toolkit cobbled together from tools I've come to need over the years (and packed into a neat little tool roll I got at a MC shop.) It's just that it annoys me to see Triumph following the lead of high-end boutique bikes like Harley where the idea is you sell someone a motorcycle as an entry ticket to a "lifestyle" (which is corporate speak for "an opportunity to sell you more overpriced crap") vs the Japanese idea of selling you a motorcycle that is fully equipped right off the showroom floor and includes all of the basic tools you need to perform rider-maintenance.
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Old 12-01-2011, 01:38 PM   #14340
Georgios
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I´m with Martin.
Although I understand the other points, in some ways, too. But Triumph should have done a little more. O.k., when you argue it´s a pure bike, then it should have a adequate price. Here in Germany it costs over 12000,-$.

At least they offer a C-Stand, that´s good, because everyone can choose if he wants.

Fuel cap issue wouldn´t bother me because of the possibility of stealing fuel, but "nice" people tend to throw sugar or sand in the tank.

About the oil filler cap, it´s not the bad accessibility alone, because at home you have all the things you need to fill up. But if you travel a few thousand miles, you may have to fill up on the road. Then you have to have a funnel and all those things. Oily funnel in the pocket ...

If the WORKS-shocks really have more travel, that would be great.

Martin, there is a way for you to have tubeless tires on spokes-wheels. I used Cyborg´s method ( # 3)
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...light=tubeless
on my spoke wheels and it really works. Greatest advantage for me, besides safety reasons, is to fix a puncture easily on the road, without picking the wheel.
Maybe this works for you, too.

Best wishes
Georgios
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