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Old 08-20-2010, 09:36 AM   #16246
jtemple
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Head
Mine is from early 1990's... Came with first generation XT I think.
Originally had a big 6-speed rear and Synchros fork and stem.
Maybe not then. Mine was the late 90s. I bought the frame and built it up myself, as it is. I did have new rims laced onto the Ringle hubs you see in the background. Both wheelsets have out lasted 4 bikes.
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Old 08-20-2010, 09:40 AM   #16247
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilGenius
My LBS has a decent selection in that price range.

Last time I was there I think they'd marked down a TREK aero bike like that from $7800 to $5something.
You don't want a TT bike as an all-rounder. VERY focused machines.

Get a regular 'road' bike and if ya wanna go aero: no offset seatpost, shorter/higher rise stem, and aero bars.

M
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Old 08-20-2010, 09:44 AM   #16248
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Head
Mine is from early 1990's... Came with first generation XT I think.
Originally had a big 6-speed rear and Synchros fork and stem.
I have a 6sp thumbshifter on my Sette mtn bike that's pretty much been on one bike or another since it was new. The other side's a Paul's Thumbie adaptor with a D/A 9sp barcon. I subscribe to the KISS theory off-road.

I'm cogitating going to a 2x10 on the cheap. All I'd need is a barcon, chain, cassette, and chainrings (which I think I have). I do believe I have a 28 and a 42 ring set for 110mm BCD cranks, that just leaves the rest. $$ I don't have right now, but soon. Oh so soon.

@ Pierce: all I have downstairs is a set of Real Design hubs that're 130mm, and the Campag hubs that Mr Head sent that are 126 FW AFA hubs go. I DID run across a DP Sora rear brake if y'all need it.

M
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Old 08-20-2010, 09:52 AM   #16249
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gummee!
You don't want a TT bike as an all-rounder. VERY focused machines.

Get a regular 'road' bike and if ya wanna go aero: no offset seatpost, shorter/higher rise stem, and aero bars.

M
Oh no, I wouldn't expect it to be.

They're just so pretty.


I am interested in getting an older road bike off of craigslist, but I don't know enough about brands and models over the years to know what to search for.
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Old 08-20-2010, 09:59 AM   #16250
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilGenius
Oh no, I wouldn't expect it to be.

They're just so pretty.


I am interested in getting an older road bike off of craigslist, but I don't know enough about brands and models over the years to know what to search for.
That's what we're here for.

Personally: Giant's are gonna be a good bet cause they're built way tough. Specialized, most of the Italian bikes are great. Bianchis have stepped up quality over the years. You'll prolly see a few of those. Lots of times, you'll find something bought, hung in the garage, and never ridden. Anything with 105 (or Athena) or better is bueno. Its yer first. You won't know enough to know enough, so ask away and we'll try and advise you.

I'm partial to off-brands: Carrera, Somec, Ciocc, Rossin, Concorde, etc. All great Italian bikes, just (hopefully) without the price of DeRosa, Pinarello, et al

M
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Old 08-20-2010, 10:05 AM   #16251
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gummee!
Anything with 105 (or Athena) or better is bueno.
What's that mean?

I've seen it a lot.
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Old 08-20-2010, 10:10 AM   #16252
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilGenius
What's that mean?

I've seen it a lot.
Components. 105 is 'entry level racing' which means it *should* stand up over time.

Athena (or whatever they're calling it now) is similar in the Campy category.

Ditto with Rival in SRAM's line

If you're 'serious' then Ultegra is a great price point to look at. If you're just getting into the sport, then stick with 105 or so. Wear out whatever yer riding and then upgrade as needed. I tend to stick with mid-level stuff for wear items like chains and cassettes. The price difference between D/A and Ultegra is HUGE with durability points going to Ultegra.

M
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Old 08-20-2010, 10:21 AM   #16253
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gummee!
That's what we're here for.
No shit. I've never seen such a small group of people, with such diverse knowledge and experiences.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gummee!
Personally: Giant's are gonna be a good bet cause they're built way tough.
Not to mention Giant is the world's largest manufacturer of premium bicycles. They make all their own stuff, to include the aforementioned Specialized brand, and many others.

My GF and I have 4 Giant and 3 Specialized bikes between us.

Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilGenius
What's that mean?

I've seen it a lot.
As "Gummee!" said, stick with those groups, or above, that he mentioned.

SRAM just came out with an entry-level group called Apex. It's just now being offered on new bikes. It's a great groupset, as I have it on a two bikes. If you're looking at used, you probably won't encounter it, though.

The problem with high-end stuff, aside from price, is the materials are lighter, but, usually less durable. That's fine if you're a pro and have the convenience of a team mechanic and inventory to swap stuff as needed. But, carbon fiber and titanium bits are senseless for the everyday rider. For comparison, a 105 rear derailluer is about $55 and Dura-Ace is around $200.
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Old 08-20-2010, 10:31 AM   #16254
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todays lesson (actually yesterday afternoon)

Make sure your empty panniers are secured to your rack prior to rolling home.

First one bailed at a busy intersection - thankfully Mr garbage truck man was nice and let me grab the pannier as he was about to run it over.

Second one bailed on climbing up an overpass on multi use trail.


Moved items from tail bag into panniers for weight. They behaved themselves the rest of the ride home.


I had my laptop and assorted sundries on the way in filling the panniers. Empty to start on way home.....


http://www.commuterbikestore.com/bre..._store=default offending panniers
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Old 08-20-2010, 10:32 AM   #16255
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I need a damn job.
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Old 08-20-2010, 10:36 AM   #16256
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Chiorda ??

never heard of those
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Old 08-20-2010, 10:39 AM   #16257
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It's hard to find a road bike around here.

At least at a reasonable price.

About 90% of what's on craigslist are mountain bikes.

Though I did find this.

But it's a wee bit pricey for me.
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Old 08-20-2010, 11:08 AM   #16258
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specialized road bike

my family owned a bike shop here in western colorado, w/some of the best riding in the country, both dirt/road.
one of the best bikes, the most bang for the buck too is the specialized roubaix. it's stiff enough for getting the power to the pedals and yet compliant enough to absorb road shock. look on craigslist for listings.

vital to get right fit, even 1 centimeter here and there can make or break feeling like you are 'within the bike.'

also, many riders are going to a compact crankset which is a double crank up front w/ 50/34 tooth cranks. rear cassette config is dependent on where you are riding. here in colo calls for an 11-27 cassette for 20 mile+ climbs over mt passes.

above all else, give yourself several months to be reeeaaaally easy on the knees with a cadence of 90-110 rpms. knee problems show up a couple months after damage is done-so patience!! get a 1000 miles on the legs before hammering on climbs etc.

i teach fitness, spin, nutrition etc as a lic therapist/life coach-past racing career etc and of the opinion that cycling can be a fitness activity that one can do until the day you die.

mt biking is similar-small, med, large frame sizes, and best kept to the dirt. cross-bikes suck at both dirt and road-best to have 2 bikes if you can afford it. enjoy!!
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Old 08-20-2010, 11:13 AM   #16259
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilGenius
Oh no, I wouldn't expect it to be.

They're just so pretty.


I am interested in getting an older road bike off of craigslist, but I don't know enough about brands and models over the years to know what to search for.
If I were going looking I'd point myself at the Specialized Allez. Paul picked one up for somewhere around $500 he of course spent hundreds of thousands on bling.
wheels with bells and diamond encrusted seats. bartape and stickers...

OK, actually I think he did seat and wheels as he found a deal at Performance. Pedals too...

Personally I'd stay away from anything French of plastic, (carbon fiber).

Steel is real. Light steel is not cheap, so Aluminum it is.

Try for more modern rear end with 9-speeds and I personally prefer a triple up front but around DFW I think the overpasses qualify as hill climbs?
The compact would work fine. 50/39 or 52/39??

I have always thought that I needed a minimum of 28 spokes at least 2cross up front or I'd die. The new bike is radial up there and seems very nice.
I like 700C rims with good brakes. Any bike with shifters up on the stem is a $50 used bike and not worth the trouble.

Look at the components.
Shimano 600 or 105 are likely to be the norm in the price range you're looking at.
I'd look for a threadless stem since that doesn't date the bike back to the stoneage and high-buck vintage junk, I mean priceless art...


Canondale made a good bike once don't know anything about what they do now. Same with Trek. They drifted off my radar onto my ignore list. Not for anything bad, I just have a short and narrowly focused attention span.
Jeck, Fuji and the like made some reasonable bikes too. I had a bike called Itoh back in the early 70's that was light and really fun to ride when Sears was selling a 50 pound "racer". Some kids stole my Itoh from my dads storage shed. The Motobecane I had to replace it was mostly junk. Center-pull brakes and aweird groupo. Hurey-Echo Dupar, or something real junk I killed in a few hundred miles of riding. I actually folded the 42 tooth chain ring leaving a stop sign in Morrison Colorado, headed up to Red Rocks. Plus the French have odd sized stems and seat posts. Makes changing components a pain. May not be true anymore... And it took a second French bike to convince me I was a moron and needed to stay away from them.

Other than the above scribbling I have nothing useful.
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Old 08-20-2010, 11:18 AM   #16260
EvilGenius
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Quote:
Originally Posted by artisbasic
my family owned a bike shop here in western colorado, w/some of the best riding in the country, both dirt/road.
one of the best bikes, the most bang for the buck too is the specialized roubaix. it's stiff enough for getting the power to the pedals and yet compliant enough to absorb road shock. look on craigslist for listings.

vital to get right fit, even 1 centimeter here and there can make or break feeling like you are 'within the bike.'

also, many riders are going to a compact crankset which is a double crank up front w/ 50/34 tooth cranks. rear cassette config is dependent on where you are riding. here in colo calls for an 11-27 cassette for 20 mile+ climbs over mt passes.

above all else, give yourself several months to be reeeaaaally easy on the knees with a cadence of 90-110 rpms. knee problems show up a couple months after damage is done-so patience!! get a 1000 miles on the legs before hammering on climbs etc.

i teach fitness, spin, nutrition etc as a lic therapist/life coach-past racing career etc and of the opinion that cycling can be a fitness activity that one can do until the day you die.

mt biking is similar-small, med, large frame sizes, and best kept to the dirt. cross-bikes suck at both dirt and road-best to have 2 bikes if you can afford it. enjoy!!
Thanks!

We were in Lake City a few weeks back and I saw some folks riding on the pass roads through and around the 11-12k foot mark.

Ya'll are nutjobs.


We don't have any real hills around here. The only ones I encounter on my usual path are somewhat steep, but less than 100' long.

I enjoy riding my cheap hybrid around, but some days I want something a little longer, more stretched out, faster, etc.
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