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Old 08-29-2010, 10:20 PM   #16606
EvilGenius
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VelvtRide


Thanks for the info. I should also mention that my father is a century rider with a few road bikes in his possession. He's got some good advice for me, but I want an unbiased opinion, too. He's letting me take out his Le Monde, 20 speed, 55cm bike out to test ride tomorrow. If I like it, I'm fucked cuz then that's all I'm gonna want and I won't wanna settle for anything less.

Thanks, Dad.... right?




Somebody shoot me now.
You're his daughter, just bat your eyelashes or some shit.
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Old 08-29-2010, 10:21 PM   #16607
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VelvtRide
Ok. After a month of riding on my comfort bike, I've come to the realization that I need a road bike if I'm going to continue to ride.

I want a POS entry level bike that will get me started, but I have no money and all I can offer to trade is my nearly new Schwinn GS comfort bike with less than 200 miles on it.

I've looked on Craigslist, but I have NO idea what's a good bike, what I need, blah blah blah.

Tell me what I need and how to get what I want with my limitations. Please.
the problem is, when you're shopping used, you have to work with what you can find. its not like we can say, "Oh! You should get a 1976 Trek TX500 in 48cm", as the odds of finding one of those in good shape (a superb underrated bike, that might well sell for just a couple $100 in decent riding condition) AND having it be the right size is between slim and none.

An older bike thats been ridden a lot will likely need some TLC, which can range from cables-n-brakepads-n-new-seat to needing to clean and regrease all the bearings (wheels, bottom bracket, headset) to needing new wheels (which can cost more than a used bike). An older bike thats been neglected will likely need a lot of this stuff, too. If someone has done all this, the price will be higher.

The SFBA Craigslist bikes site gets a ton of bikes on it, but they range from nearly new high(!) end yuppie-racebikes that are $$$$$s to a lot of real junk.

btw, there is another choice, which is a lightweight hybrid, essentially a low end road bike with flat bars, and less exotic bits than you typically find on a 'real' road bike. For instance, a Specialized Sirrus,


instead of an Allez.
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Old 08-29-2010, 10:27 PM   #16608
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VelvtRide


Thanks for the info. I should also mention that my father is a century rider with a few road bikes in his possession. He's got some good advice for me, but I want an unbiased opinion, too. He's letting me take out his Le Monde, 20 speed, 55cm bike out to test ride tomorrow. If I like it, I'm fucked cuz then that's all I'm gonna want and I won't wanna settle for anything less.

Thanks, Dad.... right?

Somebody shoot me now.
Naw, it sounds like its a spare bike to me. Tell him you'd be glad to store it in your garage for a while so he has some more room in his garage. If he doesn't need the space, ask if you can store some of your shit in there so he does...

Then around Christmas time he can just make it official and give it to you.

Honestly, you've got the right guy there to give you advice. There is nothing wrong with any of the top bikes. Le Monde is made by Trek. Both Lance and Alberto have managed to use those Treks to kick some ass.
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Old 08-29-2010, 10:28 PM   #16609
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilGenius
You're his daughter, just bat your eyelashes or some shit.
He's not one of those dads. Makes his kids work for their shit.



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Old 08-29-2010, 10:32 PM   #16610
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dahveed
Naw, it sounds like its a spare bike to me. Tell him you'd be glad to store it in your garage for a while so he has some more room in his garage. If he doesn't need the space, ask if you can store some of your shit in there so he does...

Then around Christmas time he can just make it official and give it to you.

Honestly, you've got the right guy there to give you advice. There is nothing wrong with any of the top bikes. Le Monde is made by Trek. Both Lance and Alberto have managed to use those Treks to kick some ass.
See my post above.

That bike is his baby. He has 3: one recumbent that he wants to sell, another Le Monde that's a 14 speed that's a bit larger than the one he's letting me use. I know he'd be ecstatic for me to have a road bike so we can ride together as he's mentioned that a number of times, but not enough to just give me one that he's paid through the nose for.

Thanks pierce - I'll keep a lookout. I appreciate the name drop and differences explained.
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Old 08-29-2010, 10:59 PM   #16611
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VelvtRide
See my post above.

That bike is his baby. He has 3: one recumbent that he wants to sell, another Le Monde that's a 14 speed that's a bit larger than the one he's letting me use. I know he'd be ecstatic for me to have a road bike so we can ride together as he's mentioned that a number of times, but not enough to just give me one that he's paid through the nose for.

Thanks pierce - I'll keep a lookout. I appreciate the name drop and differences explained.

but, it sounds like you're heading into serious road bike territory, so don't let my love of hybrids drag you back. a hybrid is, IMHO, more of a utility bike. somewhere halfway inbetween your inexpensive schwinn comfort bike, and a proper road bike.

to go with a proper road bike, you'll need bike shoes, shorts, and a jersey or two. you can skimp on the jersey initially, but the shoes are a must to ride with clip-on pedals, and riding shorts are a must on anything over 20 or so miles.


proper road bikes can be loosely split into two categories, competition/race bikes, and endurance/century bikes. there's also touring bikes, which are like endurance bikes only more so (racks, fenders, heavy duty wheels, usually steel frames).

companies like Specialized also make women-specific geometry road bikes, these are generally oriented around longer legs and shorter torsos than many men. Specialized has the Dolce and Ruby as an alternative to the Roubaix and Secteur endurance road bikes, and the Amira as an alternative to the men's Tarmac race bikes. now, you may not be of the body form they are targetting, and would be better off with the men's frames, I can't say, only a good bike fitter could.

these sorts of bikes very quickly climb over $1000, and don't stop until you break $10K at the extreme end. I'd figure I'd have to expect to spend about $2000 to $3000 on a good basic modern roadie before I'd be happy (I'd want a compact double with 105 or Ultegra gearing, and fairly classic geometry...)
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Old 08-30-2010, 04:54 AM   #16612
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VelvtRide
Ok. After a month of riding on my comfort bike, I've come to the realization that I need a road bike if I'm going to continue to ride.

I want a POS entry level bike that will get me started, but I have no money and all I can offer to trade is my nearly new Schwinn GS comfort bike with less than 200 miles on it.

I've looked on Craigslist, but I have NO idea what's a good bike, what I need, blah blah blah.

Tell me what I need and how to get what I want with my limitations. Please.
bikesdirect.com

Paid $500 for mine 2 years and 7K miles ago. It 'aint a Cervelo but you 'aint paying Cervelo prices.
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Old 08-30-2010, 07:18 AM   #16613
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Back in the old days we started off the sizing search by measuring from the floor up to the top of our femur. Right at the end you can feel rotate when you press in at the hip joint. Take that number and subtract about 13.75 inches. That will get you close.

Personally I'd error on the side of smaller rather than larger. smaller will be lighter and a little stiffer.

Used a middle to upper level bike can be found that you can expect to drop an few hundred into as you wear stuff out and discover what the PO and a little looking did not reveal.

Good hunting.
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Old 08-30-2010, 07:38 AM   #16614
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheNedster
Lemme see, we already have Javarilla as King of the Clydes. So I nominate Askel as the Minister of Pain and Gravel.

Y'all are makin' the rest of us look bad.
I'm pretty sure my navigational skills this weekend would qualify me as Director of the Ministry of Weights and Measures.

As Bimble can attest, apparently six of one and a half dozen of the other are NOT the same.
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Old 08-30-2010, 07:43 AM   #16615
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VelvtRide
Ok. After a month of riding on my comfort bike, I've come to the realization that I need a road bike if I'm going to continue to ride.

I want a POS entry level bike that will get me started, but I have no money and all I can offer to trade is my nearly new Schwinn GS comfort bike with less than 200 miles on it.

I've looked on Craigslist, but I have NO idea what's a good bike, what I need, blah blah blah.

Tell me what I need and how to get what I want with my limitations. Please.
I don't think I'd be cosidering an upgrade, if you're messing around at $200. There's hardly anything worth your time within that budget, CL, eBay, or not. I'd suggest making the bike purchase a priority within your lifestyle, even if it means a second job, or whatever. Sounds drastic, but, you want the bike to be for longevity. If you settle and end up progressing through several bikes, you spend way more than if you just bought something decent to begin with. A POS is just that; a POS.

Some bike shops offer the "Freedom to Ride" credit plan through Citifinancial. It's a 12 month, interest-free, payment plan. That might be an option.

One of the better suggestions here is to be looking at something that is endurance/mileage oriented. The stack height (headtube length, fork steerer length, upward stem angle/rise dimensions combined give you stack height) is higher on this type of bike because they're designed for comfortable, efficient travel. The bar is, typically, higher than the seat on these. Whereas a criterium (crit) bike is designed for circuit racing and has a much lower stack height; think nose rubbing the front tire. Also, the mileage bikes have more stable geometry and frame tube dimensions and shapes that are more conducive to a better ride than crit bikes. Crit bikes are short and stiff to quickly transfer power and maneuver within a peloton. You don't need that.

The latest craze is to buy full-on race bikes. People snag them because the bikes look cool and they have aspirations of being the next Lance, without having spent much time on a bike. The reality is, once they leave the bike shop, put a few miles on the bike, they realize that the bike is really uncomfortable. Then, it ends up hanging in the garage collecting dust. Acclimating to doing miles on a bike takes time. Today's society believes in instant gratification. Cycling doesn't work that way.

I'd highly recommend looking at something women-specific. These bike are designed around a woman's proportions and weight. The frames are dimensionally different from men's and the materials are much thinner to be lighter weight and more compliant. Putting a 110lb woman on a man's bike that fits her results in a harsh riding bike, because she's not heavy enough to induce flex into the frame. Also, the components, like levers and bars, are smaller, on women's bikes, to accommodate a woman's smaller hands and narrower shoulders.

When I bought my first road bike, I was looking at a Tricross as the most reasonable bike for me. I didn't buy it and bought a narrow-tire endurance bike, because it was more efficient than the 'cross. I, then, bought an additional bike that was even more efficient and committed. Well, neither bike will go down the country roads we have around here very well. So, I ended up buying a Tricross. It took 3 years, but, I ended up on the bike I should've bought in the first place. I've ridden centuries on it and ride it all the time as my primary bike. I sold the endurance bike and the tri bike mostly hangs in the basement (it only comes out on TT nights). The moral is below.

Lastly, your father is probably full of good, conservative advice. He's done enough miles to know what works and what doesn't. Guys like him aren't swayed by the latest-greatest trends. Generally, they believe in sound reasoning that has been proven over many years and miles. Do yourself a favor and listen closely to his advice and pay attention to what he does.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mercury264
bikesdirect.com

Paid $500 for mine 2 years and 7K miles ago. It 'aint a Cervelo but you 'aint paying Cervelo prices.
As I've posted before, I'll gladly ride anything off their site.

In consideration of "VelvtRide" with my thoughts:

For $450, I wouldn't recommend the bike, as it's too frugal on components. But, it'll get you on a road bike. Same with the Windsor.

For $600, decent bike, rear eyelets, shit for levers (trust me on that).

For $800, decent bike, rear eyelets, carbon fork, OK drivetrain and levers. It'll take 28mm tires, which ride nicer and can go down pretty crappy roads. Fenders can be mounted, though the front will need a couple additional pieces to mount it. This would be my pick, on a budget, from that site. BTW, the red color looks killer.

For $1000, really nice bike, carbon fork, carbon seatstays, carbon seatpost, good components, no eyelets (no fender or rack provision), probably not another bike as nice for the money.
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Old 08-30-2010, 09:17 AM   #16616
VelvtRide
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ducnut
I don't think I'd be cosidering an upgrade, if you're messing around at $200. There's hardly anything worth your time within that budget, CL, eBay, or not. I'd suggest making the bike purchase a priority within your lifestyle, even if it means a second job, or whatever. Sounds drastic, but, you want the bike to be for longevity. If you settle and end up progressing through several bikes, you spend way more than if you just bought something decent to begin with. A POS is just that; a POS.

Some bike shops offer the "Freedom to Ride" credit plan through Citifinancial. It's a 12 month, interest-free, payment plan. That might be an option.

One of the better suggestions here is to be looking at something that is endurance/mileage oriented. The stack height (headtube length, fork steerer length, upward stem angle/rise dimensions combined give you stack height) is higher on this type of bike because they're designed for comfortable, efficient travel. The bar is, typically, higher than the seat on these. Whereas a criterium (crit) bike is designed for circuit racing and has a much lower stack height; think nose rubbing the front tire. Also, the mileage bikes have more stable geometry and frame tube dimensions and shapes that are more conducive to a better ride than crit bikes. Crit bikes are short and stiff to quickly transfer power and maneuver within a peloton. You don't need that.

The latest craze is to buy full-on race bikes. People snag them because the bikes look cool and they have aspirations of being the next Lance, without having spent much time on a bike. The reality is, once they leave the bike shop, put a few miles on the bike, they realize that the bike is really uncomfortable. Then, it ends up hanging in the garage collecting dust. Acclimating to doing miles on a bike takes time. Today's society believes in instant gratification. Cycling doesn't work that way.

I'd highly recommend looking at something women-specific. These bike are designed around a woman's proportions and weight. The frames are dimensionally different from men's and the materials are much thinner to be lighter weight and more compliant. Putting a 110lb woman on a man's bike that fits her results in a harsh riding bike, because she's not heavy enough to induce flex into the frame. Also, the components, like levers and bars, are smaller, on women's bikes, to accommodate a woman's smaller hands and narrower shoulders.

When I bought my first road bike, I was looking at a Tricross as the most reasonable bike for me. I didn't buy it and bought a narrow-tire endurance bike, because it was more efficient than the 'cross. I, then, bought an additional bike that was even more efficient and committed. Well, neither bike will go down the country roads we have around here very well. So, I ended up buying a Tricross. It took 3 years, but, I ended up on the bike I should've bought in the first place. I've ridden centuries on it and ride it all the time as my primary bike. I sold the endurance bike and the tri bike mostly hangs in the basement (it only comes out on TT nights). The moral is below.

Lastly, your father is probably full of good, conservative advice. He's done enough miles to know what works and what doesn't. Guys like him aren't swayed by the latest-greatest trends. Generally, they believe in sound reasoning that has been proven over many years and miles. Do yourself a favor and listen closely to his advice and pay attention to what he does.



As I've posted before, I'll gladly ride anything off their site.

In consideration of "VelvtRide" with my thoughts:

For $450, I wouldn't recommend the bike, as it's too frugal on components. But, it'll get you on a road bike. Same with the Windsor.

For $600, decent bike, rear eyelets, shit for levers (trust me on that).

For $800, decent bike, rear eyelets, carbon fork, OK drivetrain and levers. It'll take 28mm tires, which ride nicer and can go down pretty crappy roads. Fenders can be mounted, though the front will need a couple additional pieces to mount it. This would be my pick, on a budget, from that site. BTW, the red color looks killer.

For $1000, really nice bike, carbon fork, carbon seatstays, carbon seatpost, good components, no eyelets (no fender or rack provision), probably not another bike as nice for the money.
Can't thank you enough for all that info.
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Old 08-30-2010, 09:19 AM   #16617
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If don't really want to spend any more money and I don't plan on entering any contests or whatever.

Why would this bike be a horrible bike to buy?
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Old 08-30-2010, 10:21 AM   #16618
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Head

And getting finished, ugly but it is going to work,


With the bar tape and a waterbottle the damages came to about $84. Not terrible. And it will work.
Did the bike come with the front break on the right or is something you changed because of personal preference?
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Old 08-30-2010, 10:28 AM   #16619
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilGenius
If don't really want to spend any more money and I don't plan on entering any contests or whatever.

Why would this bike be a horrible bike to buy?
does it fit you?

how's the ride quality?

nice that it has Shimano shifters and such, but they don't even say WHICH Shimano, and that means it could be almost anything. Neither that rear derailleur or crankset is any of the road groups on the Shimano site, not even the bottom-of-the-line 2200 or Sora.
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Old 08-30-2010, 10:44 AM   #16620
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stinez
Did the bike come with the front break on the right or is something you changed because of personal preference?
I ride a motorcycle and have done so for 35+ years. All my bicycles have had the front brake on the right, except the latest bike which is the first bike I did not build in about 34 years. That will change once I wear the bar tape enough to warrant replacement. I'm particular and somewhat cheap.
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