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Old 12-05-2010, 06:46 PM   #18106
ducnut
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Meathead View Post
I'm curious, you stated you don't like the hybrid bikes, but the suggestions made appear to be just that. Are those bikes ones that fit the "bottom bracket forward" note? If so, that's just the type of wisdom I'm looking for.
Those are city/commuter bikes. Think of them as street-ified mountain bikes. They're lighter weight, lighter handling, and faster than a MTB. Slower than a road/fitness bike, but, heavier built to support weight. You wanted a flat bar and disc brakes, so that considerably narrows the options. The roadie stuff all has caliper brakes, lightweight wheels, and skinny tires. They just aren't meant to have beastly people riding them. No doubt, you can have a custom built ride made for you, but, the options I posted are an affordable way to give this a try.

This is more of a hybrid; usually called a comfort bike. Though, with the electric assisted bikes coming to market, those are being labeled hybrid.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Meathead
If a "trail-ified" mountain bike would be a better selection (in your opinion), I'd like to hear it and see any suggestions you might have for that option.
A couple things on that option. The MTB isn't going to be as light feeling to ride on pavement, nor is it going to be as efficient. The entry-level stuff that is hardtail and has a suspended fork is usually too cheap to mess with. Clydesdales overwhelm the cheap, coil spring forks. When you're pedaling you'll get all kinds of "bobbing" from the frontend, as they have very little valving to speak of. That's why I went looking for a fully rigid bike for you. Yes, you can get a high-end MTB that'll work for you, but, you're talking thousands of dollars to get good suspension components.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Meathead
Regardless, the suggested bikes surprise me. You're right that I didn't state a budget, but I'll say I was expecting to spend twice (if not three times) the stated price of the most expensive of those, and am prepared to do so.
Again, no need to get too crazy. I can't suggest that you spend a couple grand on a bike and have it potentially sit in the garage. Grab something reasonably priced, buy the necessary gear, and give it a go. If you end up making cycling a part of your life, then, look at upgrading later. If you don't, you're not into it a stupid amount of money. There are tons of uber-expensive race replicas hanging in garages all around the world. No need to do the same. I just went looking for some options that'll support the rider's weight, be efficient enough to cover some ground, be able to adapt to commuting with a rack and fenders, and be versatile enough to use for about anything. In short, I went looking for a streetier BMW GS of bicycles.
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Old 12-05-2010, 07:56 PM   #18107
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I'm gonna agree with Ducnut on pretty much everything but I'll add: look at 29er mtn bikes too. At 6'4" yer gonna find a much more robust frame in the off-road line vs the 'flat bar road bike' line. 29ers have the same size wheels as a road bike, but with the fat tires of a mtn bike. Best of both worlds. ie: you can run *almost* road-thin tires and you can run mtn fat tires depending on the day. Most of the decent 29ers come with discs. If you get into riding bicycles, the bigger wheels and tires roll over obstacles better off-road. Think 19" GS tires vs yer 950's 21" tires...

Failing that, look at cyclocross bikes. Most of em are gonna have drop bars, but they're built more upright than yer racing/road bicycles. Now that discs are legal for racing, you're gonna find a few more with em on there. Askel likes his Redline cyclocross bike. I have one in the shop that seems well-built. Bang for the bux, it seems to be a good bet.

The more you spend, the longer stuff's gonna last under yer weight. If budget's an issue, get the nicest frame you can afford and run the parts that come on whatever yer budget allows till they run out, then upgrade.

Oh, and at yer weight, stick with one of the bigger lines: Trek, Fisher, Specialized, Giant, etc. Giants are known to be overbuilt 'cause they don't want em to break. All the rest are tough and being from big companies, can afford to replace something if you rip the bottom bracket out rehabbing that knee.

HTH

M
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Old 12-05-2010, 09:27 PM   #18108
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about 25 years ago, I shattered a knee in a car accident, and was in a full leg cast for 6 months.

I did my rehab on my old lightweight 5-speed "cruiser" bike, starting with gentle around town and bike path rides, my crutches bungi-corded to the frame and sticking out over the ample wide bars. i was on my bike long before I could walk without the crutches.

this bike is the one featured in various photos way back in this thread, currently painted bright red (it was rusty white 25 years ago).
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Old 12-06-2010, 02:18 AM   #18109
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You do realize, Meathead, that you just asked a bunch of heroin addicts what you should take for a headache, right?

Basically, buy something that fits that really makes you want to get out and ride, no matter what it is.

We've all found our own way and are quick to offer up suggestions we've learned on the kinds of bikes we ride, but it may not be appropriate to you. If you intend to start riding with some people from your area, ride what they ride.

That said, yeah- I second the cyclocross notion. I love those bikes. The cheaper ones tend to be better do-it all bikes than the more expensive race specific models. Numerous models come with disc brakes these days and I know Norcos and some Marins are disc brake ready. Just bolt 'em on, cable 'em up and go.

I'd stay away from mountain bikes unless you plan to ride singletrack. They're very good at that and not much else. I tried to do the do-it-all 29er thing this spring and it just didn't work out. I got myself an awesome, awesome singletrack bike, but that's really all it's good for. There is a new classs of bike emerging- something like the Salsa Fargo that might work, and I know a lot of guys here who have them love them, but it involves making a lot of compromises.

I'd disagree with Gummee's assertion that spending more will get you better components. As a fellow big dude, I break a lot of stuff. I've found that spending more is only true to a point. Basic, entry level, name brand components are pretty durable. Spending more often buys you lightness, but rarely does it add more durability. I find the "name brand" aspect is key here. Generally, if some company is willing to slap their logo on something, I rarely have major problems with it. It's the no-name stuff or knock off stuff from "China Happy Fun Bicycle Co." that gives me the most grief.

Also, at 265, just start planning ahead to buy a custom wheelset. Most any 32 spoke wheel with name brand hubs, spokes, and a decent rim will get you rolling. But I have killed many a stock wheelset, I find good handbuilt wheels a worthwhile investment.
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Old 12-06-2010, 03:53 AM   #18110
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Originally Posted by Askel View Post
Kinda depends on what the beginner is planning to begin at, but a Trek 1500 was my first road bike. I was happy with it, but found I wanted something with fatter tires and all the eyelets to bolt racks and fenders and stuff to.

Treks might not be the greatest value, but they're not bad, and as a result- the dealers are usually a step up and good to work with if you're just getting started.
Thanks for the info. Here's my deal. I have bad knees. I'm not convinced that my knees are going to let me do any serious riding so I don't want to spend a shitload of money on a garage ornament. OTOH, I get the impression that if I buy a more expensive bike and take the time to get it fitted correctly I will have fewer issues with my knees.

The Trek guy recommended a 1.2. It looked cool, but I don't know a thing about bikes. My initial plan is to ride 15-30 miles a few times a week.
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Old 12-06-2010, 05:21 AM   #18111
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Originally Posted by Jim Moore View Post
OTOH, I get the impression that if I buy a more expensive bike and take the time to get it fitted correctly I will have fewer issues with my knees.
If you buy anything and get fitted *by someone that knows what they're doing* you'll have fewer issues with yer knees.

M
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Old 12-06-2010, 05:33 AM   #18112
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Originally Posted by Askel View Post
You do realize, Meathead, that you just asked a bunch of heroin addicts what you should take for a headache, right?
Like askin in the KTM forum 'which bike should I buy...'

Quote:
Basically, buy something that fits that really makes you want to get out and ride, no matter what it is.
+1 Riding a bicycle is a lot like riding a MC. The engine's just different!

Quote:
We've all found our own way and are quick to offer up suggestions we've learned on the kinds of bikes we ride, but it may not be appropriate to you. If you intend to start riding with some people from your area, ride what they ride.
I'm typically a roadie. I enjoy the 'get out the front door and yer riding' aspect of it all. Here in NoVA, there's some great trails... ...3+ hours away! I race cross (next season!) and sometimes track as well, but my primary riding is out in the cowfields wandering around.

Quote:
That said, yeah- I second the cyclocross notion. I love those bikes. The cheaper ones tend to be better do-it all bikes than the more expensive race specific models. Numerous models come with disc brakes these days and I know Norcos and some Marins are disc brake ready. Just bolt 'em on, cable 'em up and go.
Pretty much everybody's jumped on the cross bandwagon. Look around. If a cross bike is the way you go, start looking here in a few weeks. Cross season's almost over.

Quote:
I'd stay away from mountain bikes unless you plan to ride singletrack. They're very good at that and not much else. I tried to do the do-it-all 29er thing this spring and it just didn't work out. I got myself an awesome, awesome singletrack bike, but that's really all it's good for. There is a new classs of bike emerging- something like the Salsa Fargo that might work, and I know a lot of guys here who have them love them, but it involves making a lot of compromises.
Meat's used to a Katoom dirt bike (well Nine-fiddy anway) so the position isn't unknown. Between that and his being a big boy, I'd say a 29er may have something to be said for it. Bigger tires = hold more air = fewer pinch flats too. Luckily, I've never been over 200# (+/- a few) so haven't had to worry too much about running anything other than 23c road tires. :phew

Quote:
I'd disagree with Gummee's assertion that spending more will get you better components. As a fellow big dude, I break a lot of stuff. I've found that spending more is only true to a point. Basic, entry level, name brand components are pretty durable. Spending more often buys you lightness, but rarely does it add more durability. I find the "name brand" aspect is key here. Generally, if some company is willing to slap their logo on something, I rarely have major problems with it. It's the no-name stuff or knock off stuff from "China Happy Fun Bicycle Co." that gives me the most grief.
Sorry, I was thinkin LX up to *mebbe* XT.

Quote:
Also, at 265, just start planning ahead to buy a custom wheelset. Most any 32 spoke wheel with name brand hubs, spokes, and a decent rim will get you rolling. But I have killed many a stock wheelset, I find good handbuilt wheels a worthwhile investment.
I'd say if yer going road sized (700c) go with a 36-hole rear wheel at the least. If the shop Meat orders from uses QBP, they're handbuilt wheels are really well built. I've sold a few pairs of em. As good or *gasp* better than I can do. After all, all these doods do all day is build wheels! They're not like the 'handbuilt' wheels you get outta J&B where you hafta go thru and basically re-build the things.
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Old 12-06-2010, 07:02 AM   #18113
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Originally Posted by Meathead View Post
In an 18,000+ post thread, I have no doubt someone's asked this before, but I also believe there must be enough interest, and there're certainly enough experts present, that answers to a repeated question won't be considered a waste.

I've recently suffered a shattered lower right femur and kneecap, due to an inattentive, illegal, unlicensed, uninsured driver making a left turn in front of me on my mc, .............
Hey Meathead - sorry to hear this. I am sitting here with my arm in a sling because of a car accident from over 2 years ago....unattentive kid hit me from behind when I was at a standstill with my youngest daughter in the car....he hit us so hard both of our seats broke back wards.....well my shoulder developed bonespurs and the muscle tore....it was never right after that accident..my surgery was Friday so I'm just hanging out - off work for a few weeks......amazing how our lives can be changed in the blink of an eye....I hope your recovery goes well.....It's great you are looking at bikes. I'm no bike expert but wife and I got our mountain bikes over the summer. We've been having a blast. One thing you need to make sure of is proper seat height from butt to pedals....I was riding for a while with my seat too low that caused my knees to ache. I researched and raised it and pain was instantly gone. Another thing is shoes and pedals. My wife is running SPDs. (Her feet are clipped into pedal) I am going to buy some 5-10 Impacts when my shoulder heals. These stick good to pedals but are not "attached." This might be better for you so you won't have to twist your foot/knee to release from the pedal...anyway I hope all goes well for you. Hopefully you will discover the magic of riding a mountain bike on single track. It is absolutely a blast plus there aren't any cars......
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Old 12-06-2010, 07:09 AM   #18114
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We have a few road riders in our club that are weighing in around the 250 mark and they are riding carbon road frames with 700 wheels (ksyrium/Bontrager) with no real major issues. I agree with starting out on the cross bike myself,get a good frame and wheels then if required upgrade components later. I have several bikes and if I had to narrow it down to one bike only it would be the cross bike forsure.
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Old 12-06-2010, 03:20 PM   #18115
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My near useless advice:
Buy a solid looking used mtb. You will want it to be late model enough to have a threadless stem so you can more easily turn the fit.
I would advise starting off with a fairly high bar position. Even the fancy hybrid pictured in an earlier post would be good for this reason alone. But, the hybrid general have lower seat to ground and pedal reach. This is a very very bad thing when re-habing legs and knees.

Very important to maintain as little knee bend as possible. This means the seat height needs to be far enough away from the pedals that you are not bending your knee much at the beginning 25 bend is too much.
This bike is not for travel or racing, this is a medical device, that can get you to town for an ice cream.

I don't like the idea of 29" wheels since these make gears taller, and harder to push. This matters to an injured joint. Plus once you're healed you can go looking for tougher bikes to beat. I think what is a best bang for the buck is what I've stated above.
Good selection of low gears, good leg extension, relaxed to upright/tunable riding position. Big puffy tires and shocks are just weight you don't need to be pushing around right now.

That is my advice such as it is.
Hope you get to moving around better.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Meathead View Post
In an 18,000+ post thread, I have no doubt someone's asked this before, but I also believe there must be enough interest, and there're certainly enough experts present, that answers to a repeated question won't be considered a waste.

I've recently suffered a shattered lower right femur and kneecap, due to an inattentive, illegal, unlicensed, uninsured driver making a left turn in front of me on my mc, as if I wasn't there. I've been told I won't be able to bear weight on that leg for 4-6 months. I'm 5 weeks into recovery, but recognize the long road ahead of me. My leg has already atrophied noticeably, and I have no doubt it'll continue to do so until virtually gone, by the time that 4-6 months has passed.

Once I am allowed to bear weight, I know many, many months of training will be necessary to get any strength, much less the size back in that leg. I spent some time "shopping" for a bike last spring, but never convinced myself to pull the trigger. I believe it to be a necessary purchase now. The zero-impact nature of riding, it seems to me, will be an ideal way of re-habilitating the muscles in my leg, with as little risk of re-injury as possible.

The Silver Comet Trail, a Rails-To-Trails project, passes within a few miles of my house, and forms the rear border of our company's property. I expect a vast majority of my riding will be on that trail and may, once I become at least mildly proficient at this, actually ride to work once in a while. I do have some interest in riding dirt/gravel roads as well, though, so am interested in researching (mooching knowledge off you doods) the best "crossover"/hybrid options available.

I've lost about 30 lbs since my wreck, but fully expect to get back to my 265-ish "fighting weight" one day. I understand my weight is likely far beyond any standard design weight, so I anticipate paying a premium for wheels that're up to the task, if not for a model with a frame that is as well. I also intend to spend whatever's necessary to get disc brakes, as I believe they're the greatest thing since sliced bread and Gummy Bears.

I'd love to hear from anyone who cares to respond, anything you've got to say about either my recovery/rehab or, more appropriately (in this thread) about my intended bike purchase. I've gathered there're a lot of guys here fond of the 'buy components, assemble your own bike' method, and I have no doubt it has it's merits, but, given my current condition and general lack of bicycle component knowledge, I don't think that'd be the best plan of attack for me. I think I need to plan to buy a bike from a local shop. If I get so into this that I feel some specialization is warranted, it'll have to happen with my second bike.

Thanks in advance to all who may reply.
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Old 12-06-2010, 03:25 PM   #18116
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I agree with the mountain bike suggestion.

A decent shop can fit you on a good hardtail for any amount of money
you want to spend.

As far as Wheel size, run 26" and change tires to suit the ride.
Slicks change everything.
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Old 12-07-2010, 04:26 AM   #18117
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commuted on a converted hard tail for a year with no issues . I put a larger chainring on front (48t) left the other two rings alone, put on a set of continental slicks, fenders, rear rack and was grand.



2nd cyclocross race last saturday - I am a mid packer finished 11th of 22.
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Old 12-07-2010, 04:54 AM   #18118
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I've only had one ride of two miles in the last month, but still, my treadmill test at the doctor's office yesterday was much better than last year.
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Old 12-07-2010, 05:20 AM   #18119
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Originally Posted by zippy View Post
commuted on a converted hard tail for a year with no issues . I put a larger chainring on front (48t) left the other two rings alone, put on a set of continental slicks, fenders, rear rack and was grand.



2nd cyclocross race last saturday - I am a mid packer finished 11th of 22.
pics or it didn't happen



M
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Old 12-07-2010, 06:29 AM   #18120
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pics or it didn't happen



M
Funny - I thought you were referring to this:

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Originally Posted by pilot View Post
I've only had one ride of two miles in the last month, but still, my treadmill test at the doctor's office yesterday was much better than last year.
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