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Old 12-14-2010, 07:21 AM   #18286
Mercury264
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cat0020 View Post
IMO, pickup bed is perfectly fine for carrying bicycles without spending extra $$ to stand bicycles upright obstruct rear view.
I think I paid about 30 bucks for the wood and mounts and I have no issues with obstructing the rear view at all. I'm with Gummee, you pay how much for these bikes and then just throw them in the bed of a truck....that just doesn't make sense.
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Old 12-14-2010, 08:00 AM   #18287
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I was at the LBS the other day and saw what looked to be another shiny, new Niner MTB. Upon closer inspection, there were several large, nasty dents in the downtube. I asked the shop owner WTF happened. He said the bike owner thought it would be a good idea to haul his bike around in the back of his pickup with the fork and front wheel slung over the top of the tailgate. Who woulda thunk that the scandium downtube would yeild before the steel tailgate?
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Old 12-14-2010, 09:06 AM   #18288
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gummee! View Post
Dood! Go get a pair of these

and bolt em to this

and please stop abusing yer bikes! I can hear em from here!


M

There is a 90/90 21 MT 21 between the two bikes. They don't touch each other. I don't like to take my front wheels off to load. I also don't like wiggling the weight of my bike via the fork dropouts. That's abuse. The only thing getting abused is the bed of the truck.
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Old 12-14-2010, 12:53 PM   #18289
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If you're going to carry your bike in the back of your truck, this is an excellent solution:
Thule Insta-Gater



The hold-downs fit between the floor and the gate. Put your wheel in the slot, raise the arm, then pull it down tight. Works for road, MTB, Lefty, 29er, recumbent.

I have a cable in a tiedown loop in the corner next to this in case I want to lock things - since you'd need a locking tailgate and the lock for the arm and a locking skewer otherwise.
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Old 12-14-2010, 01:03 PM   #18290
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaston Gagne View Post
I also don't like wiggling the weight of my bike via the fork dropouts. That's abuse.
uh, better not ride it, then, as THAT would be abuse, putting 100+ lbs on the fork tips, OMG.


re: truckbed carriers, these always hve seemed the most practical to me,

or
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Old 12-14-2010, 01:10 PM   #18291
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pierce View Post
re: truckbed carriers, these always hve seemed the most practical to me,
Most practical would simply be laying a bicycle in the truck bed without installing anything onto the truck, without taking anything off the biccyle.
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Old 12-14-2010, 04:02 PM   #18292
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cat0020 View Post
Most practical would simply be laying a bicycle in the truck bed without installing anything onto the truck, without taking anything off the biccyle.
sure, if you want your bikes all scratched to hell when you get there.
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Old 12-14-2010, 04:36 PM   #18293
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quick advice needed

Have a nephew who is really in to riding. Both road and MTB. My son drew his name in the family gift exchange. We asked his mom for suggestions, she said he wanted a manual/book on bicycle maintenance and repair.
Suggestions? What are the odds my local shop will have something, or should I just get it online?
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Old 12-14-2010, 05:17 PM   #18294
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Originally Posted by pierce View Post
uh, better not ride it, then, as THAT would be abuse, putting 100+ lbs on the fork tips, OMG.

I never win these engineering arguments, but here goes. When the wheel is in the fork dropouts, axle and fork move together. Stress goes straight up the fork, the way the fork was intended to bear its load. When the bike carrier is in fork dropouts, the axle doesn't move, but the fork does, albeit slightly. The stress is side to side, not the way the fork was intended to bear its load. I look at it like breaking a piece of wire by bending it back and forth.

I'm probably underestimating the side to side load imposed by turning.
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Old 12-14-2010, 05:22 PM   #18295
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Meathead View Post
In an 18,000+ post thread, I have no doubt someone's asked this before, but I also believe there must be enough interest, and there're certainly enough experts present, that answers to a repeated question won't be considered a waste.

I've recently suffered a shattered lower right femur and kneecap, due to an inattentive, illegal, unlicensed, uninsured driver making a left turn in front of me on my mc, as if I wasn't there. I've been told I won't be able to bear weight on that leg for 4-6 months. I'm 5 weeks into recovery, but recognize the long road ahead of me. My leg has already atrophied noticeably, and I have no doubt it'll continue to do so until virtually gone, by the time that 4-6 months has passed.

Once I am allowed to bear weight, I know many, many months of training will be necessary to get any strength, much less the size back in that leg. I spent some time "shopping" for a bike last spring, but never convinced myself to pull the trigger. I believe it to be a necessary purchase now. The zero-impact nature of riding, it seems to me, will be an ideal way of re-habilitating the muscles in my leg, with as little risk of re-injury as possible.

The Silver Comet Trail, a Rails-To-Trails project, passes within a few miles of my house, and forms the rear border of our company's property. I expect a vast majority of my riding will be on that trail and may, once I become at least mildly proficient at this, actually ride to work once in a while. I do have some interest in riding dirt/gravel roads as well, though, so am interested in researching (mooching knowledge off you doods) the best "crossover"/hybrid options available.

I've lost about 30 lbs since my wreck, but fully expect to get back to my 265-ish "fighting weight" one day. I understand my weight is likely far beyond any standard design weight, so I anticipate paying a premium for wheels that're up to the task, if not for a model with a frame that is as well. I also intend to spend whatever's necessary to get disc brakes, as I believe they're the greatest thing since sliced bread and Gummy Bears.

I'd love to hear from anyone who cares to respond, anything you've got to say about either my recovery/rehab or, more appropriately (in this thread) about my intended bike purchase. I've gathered there're a lot of guys here fond of the 'buy components, assemble your own bike' method, and I have no doubt it has it's merits, but, given my current condition and general lack of bicycle component knowledge, I don't think that'd be the best plan of attack for me. I think I need to plan to buy a bike from a local shop. If I get so into this that I feel some specialization is warranted, it'll have to happen with my second bike.

Thanks in advance to all who may reply.
I read some of the replies to this and while I truly believe they have the best intentions, some of the advice isn't great.

(disclaimer - I build custom bikes for a living but I usually refer out my fit work and ALWAYS refer it to a specialist when there's a bio-mechanical problem.)

First off, most bikes shops aren't going to be able to adequately help you. I'll skip all the stuff about why asking your average local shop guy to set you up on a ride that's not going to goof up your knee. Find a specialist, preferably a fit studio that has a PT on board. Or just as good, find a PT who knows bikes and can recommend a good fitter. Be prepared to spend a few hundred $$ on the consultation and fit and then get a recommendation to find a shop that can sell you a bike to perform the way you need it to perform.

A hypothetical example...a hybrid may not be such a bad idea. Typically, they have a shorter saddle to bar reach and a higher bar than most MTB's of an equivalent size. This forces you to sit more upright and opens up your hip angle. Opening up your hip angle may relieve some tension in your hamstring which may in turn be easier for your knee. I'm not saying that's what you need specifically, but a good studio can help you sort out your needs.

Best of luck in your recovery.
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Old 12-14-2010, 05:31 PM   #18296
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pierce View Post
sure, if you want your bikes all scratched to hell when you get there.
My bikes have no paint.. titanium
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Old 12-14-2010, 05:49 PM   #18297
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ImaPoser View Post
Have a nephew who is really in to riding. Both road and MTB. My son drew his name in the family gift exchange. We asked his mom for suggestions, she said he wanted a manual/book on bicycle maintenance and repair.
Suggestions? What are the odds my local shop will have something, or should I just get it online?
One of the best sources for bicycle maintenance is Sheldon Brown. He is no longer among the living, but his website/shop lives on. Just do a google search, and voila! A veritable cornucopia of knowledge. Even comes with pictures. I know it's tough to give that as a gift, but depending on the budget, a Park workstand can be had for less than a Benjamin. I certainly couldn't do with out mine, now that I have one.
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Old 12-14-2010, 05:58 PM   #18298
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaston Gagne View Post
I never win these engineering arguments, but here goes. When the wheel is in the fork dropouts, axle and fork move together. Stress goes straight up the fork, the way the fork was intended to bear its load. When the bike carrier is in fork dropouts, the axle doesn't move, but the fork does, albeit slightly. The stress is side to side, not the way the fork was intended to bear its load. I look at it like breaking a piece of wire by bending it back and forth.

think of your forks as a spring. a spring can take a very large number of deflections as long as its within its limits such that it doesn't permanently deform.

anyways, people have been putting bikes on fork mount carriers for a very long time, including serious graphite race bikes, etc etc.
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Old 12-14-2010, 06:00 PM   #18299
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ImaPoser View Post
Have a nephew who is really in to riding. Both road and MTB. My son drew his name in the family gift exchange. We asked his mom for suggestions, she said he wanted a manual/book on bicycle maintenance and repair.
Suggestions? What are the odds my local shop will have something, or should I just get it online?
I remember a good book on 10 Speed Press (Berkeley) many years ago, but it was from the age of Steel and when 10 speed meant 2 x 5 with friction shifters.
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Old 12-14-2010, 06:34 PM   #18300
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jsquared View Post
One of the best sources for bicycle maintenance is Sheldon Brown. He is no longer among the living, but his website/shop lives on. Just do a google search, and voila! A veritable cornucopia of knowledge. Even comes with pictures. I know it's tough to give that as a gift, but depending on the budget, a Park workstand can be had for less than a Benjamin. I certainly couldn't do with out mine, now that I have one.
...but he isn't infallible... Read with a skeptical mind and see if it makes sense for you.

AFA books: yer LBS prolly ain't gonna have nuthin, but Barnes and Noble or Borders will. Amazon too. If he's a racer, get him Joe Friel's book, or Time Crunched Cyclist.

Zinn's books are pretty good for the maintenance thing. The Bicycle Wheel by Jobst Brandt is excellent.

If you really wanna go all-out, get him a ticket to UBI or the other institute that teaches mechanicing.

M
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