ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Fluff > Sports
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 498 votes, 4.94 average. Display Modes
Old 04-08-2011, 12:03 PM   #19636
YakSpout
Obstacle Allusion
 
YakSpout's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2003
Location: all by myself
Oddometer: 6,182
I'm already committed to another ride, but this looks like a pretty good time if you're in the Los Angeles area.

7 miles of downtown LA streets closed to car traffic for 5 hours.

http://ciclavia.wordpress.com/
YakSpout is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2011, 12:28 PM   #19637
pierce
Aven'Tourer
 
pierce's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2003
Location: S'Cruz
Oddometer: 10,114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ridge View Post
Just picked up this little gem a couple of days ago. I have since stripped it down to the frame and am pondering what to do with it.

1975 Raleigh Record with Simplex front der., suntour V-GT Luxe rear der., Weinmann brakes and 27 x 1-1/4 wheels. Made in Ireland.



Thinking of selling off all the oem components and building it up as a bomb-proof tourer/commuter.
a Record? thats a heavy soft steel frame, bottom of the line bike. Also probably all has funky nonstandard Raleigh threads, so you won't even be able to put an alloy crank on it (and that cotter-pin steel crank is like 5 lbs of crap). not worth the effort, IMHO. a Professional of that vintage, priceless, sweet riding frame. 1-2 models under the pro, decent frames. Records and Grand Prix are basically junk bikes. A Super Course, or better, an International, would be suitable for what you want (imho, butchernig a 70s' Raleigh Pro to turn it into a cafe fixie would be criminal).
__________________
Experience is what you get when you don't get what you want.
pierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2011, 12:34 PM   #19638
pierce
Aven'Tourer
 
pierce's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2003
Location: S'Cruz
Oddometer: 10,114
speaking of Raleighs. I could KILL myself for wrecking one of these in the late 70s...



thats a 1970 Raleigh Pro Mk II, same color and everything, was a schweeeeet riding touring bike, all campi n.r. sewups (tubulars), brooks pro saddle, etc.

another one (pics cribbed from Sheldon's pages on vintage raleighs)


__________________
Experience is what you get when you don't get what you want.
pierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2011, 12:43 PM   #19639
Ridge
Sinister Kid
 
Ridge's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Location: Searching...
Oddometer: 1,943
Quote:
Originally Posted by pierce View Post
a Record? thats a heavy soft steel frame, bottom of the line bike. Also probably all has funky nonstandard Raleigh threads, so you won't even be able to put an alloy crank on it (and that cotter-pin steel crank is like 5 lbs of crap). not worth the effort, IMHO. a Professional of that vintage, priceless, sweet riding frame. 1-2 models under the pro, decent frames. Records and Grand Prix are basically junk bikes. A Super Course, or better, an International, would be suitable for what you want (imho, butchernig a 70s' Raleigh Pro to turn it into a cafe fixie would be criminal).

Maybe I'll just clean everything up and sell it to some college kid for a mild profit.
__________________
Correlation does not imply causation.
Ridge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2011, 12:49 PM   #19640
Zodiac OP
loosely portrayed
 
Zodiac's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2001
Location: Brooklyn
Oddometer: 31,764
Quote:
Originally Posted by pierce View Post
a Record? thats a heavy soft steel frame, bottom of the line bike. Also probably all has funky nonstandard Raleigh threads, so you won't even be able to put an alloy crank on it (and that cotter-pin steel crank is like 5 lbs of crap). not worth the effort, IMHO. a Professional of that vintage, priceless, sweet riding frame. 1-2 models under the pro, decent frames. Records and Grand Prix are basically junk bikes. A Super Course, or better, an International, would be suitable for what you want (imho, butchernig a 70s' Raleigh Pro to turn it into a cafe fixie would be criminal).
Raleigh Record 1980

That was my first real 10 speed, had one in a burgundy red, weighed a freaking metric ton but took me on my first century.
__________________
Black Shadow of Vincent, falls on a Triumph line

I've got my motorcycle jacket but I'm walking all the time...
Zodiac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2011, 02:44 PM   #19641
rbrsddn
3banger
 
rbrsddn's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2006
Location: Madison,CT
Oddometer: 2,835
Ny first 10 Speed was a '74 Raleigh Grand Prix, that I bought from my sister for 75 bucks. A good bike, until it was stolen from a friends yard in 1975. I didn't buy another true road bike until I got my Rhygin in 1998, which I still ride. That picture of the Raleigh Professional reminds me of me around age 13 or so, when my neighbors had 2 or 3 Raleigh "Carlton's" in their shed, which I could access by sneaking through another back yard. I was so tempted to steal one of them, because they were the coolest bikes I had ever seen. Good thing I found Mini Bikes, or I would have gotten my ass kicked, if I had followed through with my plan! There were a few older boys in the family, and they would've beelined right to my house, as I was a known opportunist/Pain in the ass.
rbrsddn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2011, 03:16 PM   #19642
pierce
Aven'Tourer
 
pierce's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2003
Location: S'Cruz
Oddometer: 10,114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gummee! View Post
Dura Ace only works with Dura Ace in that vintage. You're looking at some serious coin to upgrade that D/A hub. Them freehub bodies is SPEN-dee!

M
afaik, the UG->HG conversion for early D/A is now unobtanium.
__________________
Experience is what you get when you don't get what you want.
pierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2011, 04:59 PM   #19643
ducnut
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Location: central IL
Oddometer: 3,321
Quote:
Originally Posted by pierce View Post
a Record? thats a heavy soft steel frame, bottom of the line bike. Also probably all has funky nonstandard Raleigh threads, so you won't even be able to put an alloy crank on it (and that cotter-pin steel crank is like 5 lbs of crap). not worth the effort, IMHO.
Your assessment of what one can do to these frames is totally incorrect. One can install a modern crank with a sealed bearing BB (check the link in my post just above). Furthermore, modern wheels, headsets, brakes, and other components are available, too. I, also, question "heavy soft steel frame". It might be an excellent riding foundation, as my BSA has turned out to be. The weight is in the components, not the frame.

Good "old school" shops, like Velo Mine, can make a neat bike out what "Ridge" has. When other "modern" shops laughed at my BSA, Velo Mine enthusiastically jumped right in.
__________________
'09 Triumph Tiger1050
'96 Ducati 900SS
'02 Suzuki SV650S (hers)
ducnut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2011, 05:10 PM   #19644
Ridge
Sinister Kid
 
Ridge's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Location: Searching...
Oddometer: 1,943
Quote:
Originally Posted by ducnut View Post
Your assessment of what one can do to these frames is totally incorrect. One can install a modern crank with a sealed bearing BB (check the link in my post just above). Furthermore, modern wheels, headsets, brakes, and other components are available, too. I, also, question "heavy soft steel frame". It might be an excellent riding foundation, as my BSA has turned out to be. The weight is in the components, not the frame.

Good "old school" shops, like Velo Mine, can make a neat bike out what "Ridge" has. When other "modern" shops laughed at my BSA, Velo Mine enthusiastically jumped right in.

Thanks for the link ducnut. I'll check them out and see what they think. I also have a great resource with the owner of classicrendezvous as a local friend.
__________________
Correlation does not imply causation.
Ridge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2011, 05:14 PM   #19645
pierce
Aven'Tourer
 
pierce's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2003
Location: S'Cruz
Oddometer: 10,114
Quote:
Originally Posted by ducnut View Post
Your assessment of what one can do to these frames is totally incorrect. One can install a modern crank with a sealed bearing BB (check the link in my post just above). Furthermore, modern wheels, headsets, brakes, and other components are available, too. I, also, question "heavy soft steel frame". It might be an excellent riding foundation, as my BSA has turned out to be. The weight is in the components, not the frame.
well, if you compare a low end 70s straight gauge plain steel frame-only with a higher end double butted chrome-moly 70's frame-only, you'll see there's a huge difference in the weight of the frame, plus the ride of the better double butted steel frames is just plain nicer, plush even. double butted 531 or equiv. forks are springy, as are 531 stays vs the heavy softer steel stays and forks used on the cheap bikes of the same era. sure, all the parts on the low end bike are also heavy junk and add up to more than half the total. now, the mid range bike frames from the later 70s are very very good, things like Ishiwata tubing and so forth were every bit as good as the high end european stuff.
__________________
Experience is what you get when you don't get what you want.
pierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2011, 06:16 PM   #19646
ducnut
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Location: central IL
Oddometer: 3,321
Quote:
Originally Posted by pierce View Post
well, if you compare a low end 70s straight gauge plain steel frame-only with a higher end double butted chrome-moly 70's frame-only, you'll see there's a huge difference in the weight of the frame, plus the ride of the better double butted steel frames is just plain nicer, plush even. double butted 531 or equiv. forks are springy, as are 531 stays vs the heavy softer steel stays and forks used on the cheap bikes of the same era. sure, all the parts on the low end bike are also heavy junk and add up to more than half the total. now, the mid range bike frames from the later 70s are very very good, things like Ishiwata tubing and so forth were every bit as good as the high end european stuff.
But, you're basically discounting everything that is other than the best. That's like saying, in today's comparisons, "If you ride a GS, it's crap compared to a GS-A", "You ride a KLR? Ha ha ha!", or "If your bike isn't carbon fiber, it's crap".

I'll gladly ride that old, soft stuff. Everything new that I've ridden is so rigid. Yes, CF damps vibration, but, it has no give. That's what I like about the old BSA; you can feel it flex and absorb. It has me seriously looking at a Surly LHT, Waterford/Gunnar, or maybe a Lynskey.
__________________
'09 Triumph Tiger1050
'96 Ducati 900SS
'02 Suzuki SV650S (hers)
ducnut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2011, 06:23 PM   #19647
pierce
Aven'Tourer
 
pierce's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2003
Location: S'Cruz
Oddometer: 10,114
Quote:
Originally Posted by ducnut View Post
But, you're basically discounting everything that is other than the best. That's like saying, in today's comparisons, "If you ride a GS, it's crap compared to a GS-A", "You ride a KLR? Ha ha ha!", or "If your bike isn't carbon fiber, it's crap".

I'll gladly ride that old, soft stuff. Everything new that I've ridden is so rigid. Yes, CF damps vibration, but, it has no give. That's what I like about the old BSA; you can feel it flex and absorb. It has me seriously looking at a Surly LHT, Waterford/Gunnar, or maybe a Lynskey.
nah, there's a whole bunch in the middle. i'm just suggesting stay away from the bottom line stuff, of which yeah, there's way lots of. a mid range miyata or fuji or panasonic, or a mid range raleigh like a international or supercourse, or the equiv from any of the 100 other brands, is a much nicer frame than a Record or Grand Prix. my kid's 77 trek is a really nice frame with a sweet ride (even if too tall for me) and it was a midrange bike when new.

my general rule on 70's bikes is, if they have cotterless aluminum cranks, alloy rims and stainless spokes, alloy bars, gooseneck and seatpost, they are probably worth messing with. if they don't have those things, they probably aren't.
__________________
Experience is what you get when you don't get what you want.
pierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2011, 07:52 PM   #19648
surly357
Cochetopa dreamin'
 
surly357's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2008
Location: Colorado
Oddometer: 584
Quote:
Originally Posted by pierce View Post
my general rule on 70's bikes is, if they have cotterless aluminum cranks, alloy rims and stainless spokes, alloy bars, gooseneck and seatpost, they are probably worth messing with. if they don't have those things, they probably aren't.

+1.

i'm sure there are plenty of folks who, for reasons real or imagined, just love their gas pipe specials. nostalgia sometimes makes 'classics' out of anything old. find a copy of eugene sloanes old bicycling book (the bible of cycling in the 70's). it's fun to read contemporary views of those bikes and parts.....

i like to quote james free's advice to choose a quality pup from his classic book on retriever training- "it's just as easy to love a good one."
surly357 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2011, 04:56 AM   #19649
ducnut
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Location: central IL
Oddometer: 3,321
Quote:
Originally Posted by pierce View Post
my general rule on 70's bikes is, if they have cotterless aluminum cranks, alloy rims and stainless spokes, alloy bars, gooseneck and seatpost, they are probably worth messing with. if they don't have those things, they probably aren't.
Agreed. That's probably not a bad starting point.
__________________
'09 Triumph Tiger1050
'96 Ducati 900SS
'02 Suzuki SV650S (hers)
ducnut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2011, 02:11 PM   #19650
pierce
Aven'Tourer
 
pierce's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2003
Location: S'Cruz
Oddometer: 10,114
I might also add if they have huret or simplex derailleurs, the rest of the bits are probably equally low quality.



60's and early 70s bikes pretty much have to have at least part campi on them to be any good. mid-to-later 70s midrange bikes were usually suntour and shimano, which was generally much better than huret or simplex (especially the mid-to-better suntour shifters with mostly-to-all alloy rears).

on the early suntour/shimano derailleurs, the better rears had aluminum side plates on the takeup arms, and the best ones were all aluminum (except pins and pivots, of course). ditto, the better fronts had alloy parallelogram arms (I think all fronts have chrome steel cages), and the best fronts had aluminum clamps.

The mid-to-better early Suntour was revolutionary.



had some features I loved like you could completely unhook the chain from the swingarm without any tools. they pioneered the angled parallelogram that all new derailleurs use.
__________________
Experience is what you get when you don't get what you want.

pierce screwed with this post 04-09-2011 at 02:27 PM
pierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 01:33 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2015