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Old 04-08-2011, 05:10 PM   #19756
Ridge
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ducnut View Post
Your assessment of what one can do to these frames is totally incorrect. One can install a modern crank with a sealed bearing BB (check the link in my post just above). Furthermore, modern wheels, headsets, brakes, and other components are available, too. I, also, question "heavy soft steel frame". It might be an excellent riding foundation, as my BSA has turned out to be. The weight is in the components, not the frame.

Good "old school" shops, like Velo Mine, can make a neat bike out what "Ridge" has. When other "modern" shops laughed at my BSA, Velo Mine enthusiastically jumped right in.

Thanks for the link ducnut. I'll check them out and see what they think. I also have a great resource with the owner of classicrendezvous as a local friend.
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Old 04-08-2011, 05:14 PM   #19757
pierce
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ducnut View Post
Your assessment of what one can do to these frames is totally incorrect. One can install a modern crank with a sealed bearing BB (check the link in my post just above). Furthermore, modern wheels, headsets, brakes, and other components are available, too. I, also, question "heavy soft steel frame". It might be an excellent riding foundation, as my BSA has turned out to be. The weight is in the components, not the frame.
well, if you compare a low end 70s straight gauge plain steel frame-only with a higher end double butted chrome-moly 70's frame-only, you'll see there's a huge difference in the weight of the frame, plus the ride of the better double butted steel frames is just plain nicer, plush even. double butted 531 or equiv. forks are springy, as are 531 stays vs the heavy softer steel stays and forks used on the cheap bikes of the same era. sure, all the parts on the low end bike are also heavy junk and add up to more than half the total. now, the mid range bike frames from the later 70s are very very good, things like Ishiwata tubing and so forth were every bit as good as the high end european stuff.
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Old 04-08-2011, 06:16 PM   #19758
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Originally Posted by pierce View Post
well, if you compare a low end 70s straight gauge plain steel frame-only with a higher end double butted chrome-moly 70's frame-only, you'll see there's a huge difference in the weight of the frame, plus the ride of the better double butted steel frames is just plain nicer, plush even. double butted 531 or equiv. forks are springy, as are 531 stays vs the heavy softer steel stays and forks used on the cheap bikes of the same era. sure, all the parts on the low end bike are also heavy junk and add up to more than half the total. now, the mid range bike frames from the later 70s are very very good, things like Ishiwata tubing and so forth were every bit as good as the high end european stuff.
But, you're basically discounting everything that is other than the best. That's like saying, in today's comparisons, "If you ride a GS, it's crap compared to a GS-A", "You ride a KLR? Ha ha ha!", or "If your bike isn't carbon fiber, it's crap".

I'll gladly ride that old, soft stuff. Everything new that I've ridden is so rigid. Yes, CF damps vibration, but, it has no give. That's what I like about the old BSA; you can feel it flex and absorb. It has me seriously looking at a Surly LHT, Waterford/Gunnar, or maybe a Lynskey.
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Old 04-08-2011, 06:23 PM   #19759
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But, you're basically discounting everything that is other than the best. That's like saying, in today's comparisons, "If you ride a GS, it's crap compared to a GS-A", "You ride a KLR? Ha ha ha!", or "If your bike isn't carbon fiber, it's crap".

I'll gladly ride that old, soft stuff. Everything new that I've ridden is so rigid. Yes, CF damps vibration, but, it has no give. That's what I like about the old BSA; you can feel it flex and absorb. It has me seriously looking at a Surly LHT, Waterford/Gunnar, or maybe a Lynskey.
nah, there's a whole bunch in the middle. i'm just suggesting stay away from the bottom line stuff, of which yeah, there's way lots of. a mid range miyata or fuji or panasonic, or a mid range raleigh like a international or supercourse, or the equiv from any of the 100 other brands, is a much nicer frame than a Record or Grand Prix. my kid's 77 trek is a really nice frame with a sweet ride (even if too tall for me) and it was a midrange bike when new.

my general rule on 70's bikes is, if they have cotterless aluminum cranks, alloy rims and stainless spokes, alloy bars, gooseneck and seatpost, they are probably worth messing with. if they don't have those things, they probably aren't.
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Old 04-08-2011, 07:52 PM   #19760
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Originally Posted by pierce View Post
my general rule on 70's bikes is, if they have cotterless aluminum cranks, alloy rims and stainless spokes, alloy bars, gooseneck and seatpost, they are probably worth messing with. if they don't have those things, they probably aren't.

+1.

i'm sure there are plenty of folks who, for reasons real or imagined, just love their gas pipe specials. nostalgia sometimes makes 'classics' out of anything old. find a copy of eugene sloanes old bicycling book (the bible of cycling in the 70's). it's fun to read contemporary views of those bikes and parts.....

i like to quote james free's advice to choose a quality pup from his classic book on retriever training- "it's just as easy to love a good one."
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Old 04-09-2011, 04:56 AM   #19761
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Originally Posted by pierce View Post
my general rule on 70's bikes is, if they have cotterless aluminum cranks, alloy rims and stainless spokes, alloy bars, gooseneck and seatpost, they are probably worth messing with. if they don't have those things, they probably aren't.
Agreed. That's probably not a bad starting point.
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Old 04-09-2011, 02:11 PM   #19762
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I might also add if they have huret or simplex derailleurs, the rest of the bits are probably equally low quality.



60's and early 70s bikes pretty much have to have at least part campi on them to be any good. mid-to-later 70s midrange bikes were usually suntour and shimano, which was generally much better than huret or simplex (especially the mid-to-better suntour shifters with mostly-to-all alloy rears).

on the early suntour/shimano derailleurs, the better rears had aluminum side plates on the takeup arms, and the best ones were all aluminum (except pins and pivots, of course). ditto, the better fronts had alloy parallelogram arms (I think all fronts have chrome steel cages), and the best fronts had aluminum clamps.

The mid-to-better early Suntour was revolutionary.



had some features I loved like you could completely unhook the chain from the swingarm without any tools. they pioneered the angled parallelogram that all new derailleurs use.
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pierce screwed with this post 04-09-2011 at 02:27 PM
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Old 04-09-2011, 06:19 PM   #19763
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It has me seriously looking at a Surly LHT, Waterford/Gunnar, or maybe a Lynskey.
Well then, you might want to drop by the Lynskey factory when you visit Chattanooga next month. They are made up in Ooltewah about 5 miles from my house.
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Old 04-09-2011, 06:53 PM   #19764
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Originally Posted by pierce View Post
I might also add if they have huret or simplex derailleurs, the rest of the bits are probably equally low quality.



60's and early 70s bikes pretty much have to have at least part campi on them to be any good. mid-to-later 70s midrange bikes were usually suntour and shimano, which was generally much better than huret or simplex (especially the mid-to-better suntour shifters with mostly-to-all alloy rears).

on the early suntour/shimano derailleurs, the better rears had aluminum side plates on the takeup arms, and the best ones were all aluminum (except pins and pivots, of course). ditto, the better fronts had alloy parallelogram arms (I think all fronts have chrome steel cages), and the best fronts had aluminum clamps.

The mid-to-better early Suntour was revolutionary.



had some features I loved like you could completely unhook the chain from the swingarm without any tools. they pioneered the angled parallelogram that all new derailleurs use.
I have this one in the pic. V-GT Luxe?

Quote:
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Well then, you might want to drop by the Lynskey factory when you visit Chattanooga next month. They are made up in Ooltewah about 5 miles from my house.
Mmmmmmm, Lynskey.....
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Old 04-09-2011, 07:50 PM   #19765
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I have this one in the pic. V-GT Luxe?
I think so, or something like that. I had one of those on my old cruiser and totally wore out its upper plastic idler pulley after 20+ years... looked like a drum, wasn't a tooth left on it, hahahahah, so it couldn't shift anymore. darn. replacement part was unobtanium so now its sporting some cheap shimano altus or altera or something. same thing on the mountech suntour on my 1st year stumpjumper, wore the upper shift pulley after 20+ years, had to put a shimano on it. sigh, I liked those old suntours a lot.
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Old 04-09-2011, 09:04 PM   #19766
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Cool L, I'm picking her up tomorrow in Piermont NY, maybe a wknd soon I can christen her.....
Got her, yet? I could be game for next weekend.

Quote:
Where in NJ?, there is indeed some good riding in north NJ and it's actually pretty bike friendly.
I can vouch for Edgewater being a great place to be, and Hoboken/ Jersey City are also good if you're wanting a more city style life.
I haven't gotten too specific, yet. Someplace with a reasonable train ride into Penn Station, good access to trails and quiet backroads, and (hopefully) a decent climbing gym.
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Old 04-10-2011, 04:26 AM   #19767
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Paris-Roubaix is going on RIGHT NOW!





M
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Old 04-10-2011, 07:18 AM   #19768
Ricardo Kuhn
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Paris-Roubaix is going on RIGHT NOW!





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Old 04-10-2011, 05:38 PM   #19769
Ridge
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Wow I'm tired! Full weekend of racing. Crit yesterday that started dry and ended very cold and wet. Tires were sliding all over and two guys crashed out. Salvaged 8th out of 20 from pacing the first (dry) half. 120psi does not perform well on wet, potholed streets and corners...

Today's race was much better and drier. I secured my first podium of the year. One guy soloed off the front with a lap to go and no one grabbed his wheel. I chased down second and passed him with about 40 yards to the finish and had someone on my wheel that pulled half a wheel on me to the line. I had a solid third though and it felt great! Felt even better to win some $$ to cover gas and entry fee.

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Old 04-10-2011, 06:08 PM   #19770
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Congrats Ridge...
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