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Old 04-12-2011, 04:57 PM   #19801
Cat0020
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gummee! View Post
Me? Today? Lots.

M
You're likely to have wasted lots of energy riding in that big/big gearing... not to mention extra wear on your chain, big chainring and largest cog. Similar if not the same gear ratio are likely produced elsewhere in your 2x9 or 2x10 speeds.
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Old 04-12-2011, 07:52 PM   #19802
mgorman
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Looking for a set of those with a track hub for my single speeds, been drooling over them for weeks now! If my Zipp TT wheels sell, I may have them


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ridge View Post
New bling for the race rig. My thumbs are killing me!

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Old 04-12-2011, 11:29 PM   #19803
neanderthal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gummee! View Post
You tried RAM?

M
They don't have it listed on their website, but I am going to email them and see if they have something that is dimensionally rights.

Thanks for pointing me in the right direction.
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Old 04-13-2011, 06:39 AM   #19804
Gummee!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mgorman View Post
Looking for a set of those with a track hub for my single speeds, been drooling over them for weeks now! ** If my Zipp TT wheels sell,** I may have them


M
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Old 04-13-2011, 06:43 AM   #19805
Gummee!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cat0020 View Post
You're likely to have wasted lots of energy riding in that big/big gearing... not to mention extra wear on your chain, big chainring and largest cog. Similar if not the same gear ratio are likely produced elsewhere in your 2x9 or 2x10 speeds.
Studies have shown that physically bigger gear combos produce less drag. Why do you think all those Tour riders were riding 15t der. pulleys last year?

...but I agree that it wasn't good for my drivetrain.

M
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Old 04-13-2011, 07:04 AM   #19806
Cat0020
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gummee! View Post
Studies have shown that physically bigger gear combos produce less drag. Why do you think all those Tour riders were riding 15t der. pulleys last year?

M
Not talking about the usage of cog/chainring with more teeths, but the cross location of the gearing require the chain to be working at an angle, that creates extra drag.
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Old 04-13-2011, 08:26 AM   #19807
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Askel View Post
Kit, Bruce, and I will all be heading down to the Almanzo next month. If you want to team up again for the Gentlemen's Ride, let me know and we can start making plans!

Hey Askel,
I'm registered for Almanzo next month; I'll keep an eye out for you. Riding it with my bicycle/moto buddy Dave and we're also in for Cheq 100 the following weekend.
Starting to get some bike legs going and winter fat thinned a bit after not riding all winter.
Assuming I'll be on my CX bike I'll be on a bright orange steel La Cruz.
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Old 04-13-2011, 08:45 AM   #19808
GS Dave
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me racin on saturday (the second rider)
http://brianleddyphoto.photoshelter....000GMibMrEQKqk
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Old 04-13-2011, 09:31 AM   #19809
DasMatti
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couple o days ago, someone asked me for action-pictures.
hope u njoy this

Schladming Dh Track on pinkbike.com

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Old 04-13-2011, 11:12 AM   #19810
Askel
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Location: Da UP, eh.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PMC View Post
Hey Askel,
I'm registered for Almanzo next month; I'll keep an eye out for you. Riding it with my bicycle/moto buddy Dave and we're also in for Cheq 100 the following weekend.
Starting to get some bike legs going and winter fat thinned a bit after not riding all winter.
Assuming I'll be on my CX bike I'll be on a bright orange steel La Cruz.
Pete
Cool! Orange steel La Cruz's are pretty common at these sorts of things (I rode with two of them at the Rag' at the same time!), but I'll keep an eye out anyway. I'll be on the beat up black and blue Jake. Probably sporting rack(s) and maybe a bit of extra luggage to get me through the 162.

I figure the 162 should be hard enough, so didn't even consider the Cheq 100 this time. Still, I have like 7 teammates in it this year, so I may go down with them to help out.
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Old 04-13-2011, 11:48 AM   #19811
fifthcircle
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Talk to me about pulling a kid....

I am about to have my first. I am looking forward to dragging him around town behind me on the bike.
What trailer's are good?
How old does the kid need to be?
What have I gotten myself into?
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In short, adaptation is the precursor to growth and seeking out difficult, uncomfortable and challenging situations accelerates development, enriches our lives and provides us with the kind of awesome fucking memories that will sustain us until a final sleep rounds our little lives.
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Old 04-13-2011, 12:19 PM   #19812
pierce
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fifthcircle View Post
Talk to me about pulling a kid....

I am about to have my first. I am looking forward to dragging him around town behind me on the bike.
What trailer's are good?
How old does the kid need to be?
What have I gotten myself into?
we had a classic burley, that rocked. picked it up used, and dragged 2 kids around with it til they outgrew it, then used it as a music festival chair hauling ring for another buncha years til it was so beat up I retired it by donating it to the local 'Bike Church', dude said he was going to rebuild it to be a surfboard carrier :) Now, Burley invented these things, and are something of a premium product, theres a bazillion clones out there for less to much less. But if I could afford it, I'd go with a newer model Burley in a blink, otherwise I'd check the heck out of one, then look at the clones for somethign thats comparably well built.


for our usage, having the optional 'idler wheel' up front and pushbar to convert it to a stroller was priceless, extremely handy at music festivals. of course, if you don't do that sort of thing, then its of less value.

age-wise, I know they need to be old enough that they are able to hold their heads up all the time, I'd say when they are at the 'toddler' stage, I dunno is that 2-2.5 ? Mine are 16 and 20 now, and that stage is all blurred together. hah! Babies that are in rear facing car seats, definitely not. K, burley's FAQ says...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Burley
Q. How old should a child be to ride in a Burley trailer?
A. Your child should be able to sit upright unattended and hold his or her head up while wearing a helmet. Please check with your pediatrician if you are in doubt about your child's neck strength. Children typically are able to ride in the trailer until about age six, or until they become too tall for their helmet to fit below the internal roll bar.
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Old 04-13-2011, 01:44 PM   #19813
fifthcircle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pierce View Post
we had a classic burley, that rocked.

for our usage, having the optional 'idler wheel' up front and pushbar to convert it to a stroller was priceless
Perfect, thanks!
I will want one I can run behind as well. Sounds like I won't be able to do it yet this year, since the kid will only be 6 months by November. Maybe I can put it on my Christmas list
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In short, adaptation is the precursor to growth and seeking out difficult, uncomfortable and challenging situations accelerates development, enriches our lives and provides us with the kind of awesome fucking memories that will sustain us until a final sleep rounds our little lives.
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Old 04-13-2011, 02:36 PM   #19814
GP640
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Chariot.

We got a 1 kid model and it was awesome. Pulled really nice, had suspension, got the infant sling to use before the kiddo was old enough to fit the
regular seat.
The biggest advantage to the single was the ability to use it as a stroller
and not take up the whole sidewalk.
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Old 04-13-2011, 02:58 PM   #19815
elchulopadre
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Race Report (or Who said Sundays are for resting?)

First of all, THANKS TO EVERYONE for all the kind words of encouragement before the race, and of celebration afterwards! It felt great to have you all 'along for the ride', and it was incredible to come home after a tough day to find everyone's "fan mail" - it meant a lot, and made the moment even more special!

I also need to give really special thanks to Mark and Lesley, who are some of the nicest people I've met, and who were AWESOME hosts. They both went out of their ways to make sure my mom and I had a wonderful time in South Africa. Mark raced on Sunday, and it was also his first Ironman - my training was mostly very solitary, so it was great to have a 'partner in crime' for the entire week.

Warning: what follows is a pretty wordy description of my day. Here's an 'executive summary' in case you don't want to read through the whole thing!

- Perfect weather, with a calm ocean, very little wind on the bike course, and plenty o' heat on the run
- Tremendous atmosphere, with the entire town of Port Elizabeth out on the streets cheering for us
- A beautiful course, with dolphins at sunset and many sections along coastal roads
- My swim was solid, with a pretty decent pace throughout
- I went too hard on the bike, slowing down in the last lap and saving too little energy for the run
- Run was tough physically, but after letting myself recover I found the mental strength to have a strong finish
- The finish was a LOT more emotional than I had expected
- Chrissie Wellington is my new hero
- Legs holding up surprisingly well
- World's funniest tan. Seriously - it's hilarious.

OK, that's it for the executive summary - read on at your own peril :)

So, an Ironman consists of a 3.8 km swim, a 180 km bike ride, and a 42.2 km run. At least, that's what you sign yourself up for. It's every bit as painful as it sounds, and it requires a LOT of preparation - physical and mental (not to mention logistical!). The payoff, however, is absolutely incredible - I enjoyed every minute of it (yes, even the painful ones, and there were plenty!), and it ranks as one of my proudest accomplishments so far. I'll try to describe what my day was like - the agony and the ecstasy, the beautiful and the kinda gross, and everything else that made sunday such a special day for me.

The day started with a 4am wakeup call (and a 4:05 alarm, just in case!). I had everything I needed neatly set up from the evening before, to make sure my sleepy brain wouldn't miss anything. After having a few Clif bars, it was off to Hobie Beach in beautiful Port Elizabeth, to take care of final preparations at the Transition Area (where you set up all your stuff - you go there after the swim to get your bike, and after the ride to get your running shoes). Emotionally, I felt prepared. Physically, I felt stronger than ever - not only had I completed a lot of training, I was also very well rested.

I met Mark at the Transition area, and from there we went to find our Cheerleading Squad (Lesley and my mom) before heading down to the beach to warm up. I wasn't nervous or anxious at all - I was really excited, especially as the sun started to rise. We saw dolphins by the swim course just as we were zipping up our wetsuits - talk about a great start to a special day! In addition to our squad, there were tons of spectators on the beach - not just friends and relatives, but locals out to support the nutjobs who signed themselves up for a day's worth of pain. There was traditional African music, along with a troupe of dancers in traditional clothes... it was a festive atmosphere, and it only added to the excitement.

A few minutes later, about 1700 athletes (including the two of us) would be dashing into the Indian Ocean, swimming towards the low sun before reaching the first buoy. The water was nice and cold, but that's fine - what wasn't so fun was the thrashing and kicking and elbowing that results when you go for a competitive swim with 1700 of your closest friends! I used to panic with the 'swim-jitsu' - but on sunday, I sort of expected it and carried on regardless. It's an 'unintentionally-physical' sport, and it takes some getting used to to crash into people when your face is underwater.

The swim course was only half the race distance, so we did two loops. I found a great pace for my first lap, and when I was coming in after the first lap I felt like the swim, at least, was going to be over soon without too much effort. I held my pace on the second lap, feeling pretty strong all the way around. I may have... er... "shared a little bit of my breakfast" at some point in that lap (sorry, everyone behind me!) but it wasn't anything. My hands and wrists, for some reason, started to get a bit chilly at the VERY end, when I was about 50m from the shore on my way in.

Not much to say for transition - went smoothly, everything was in its right place, and before long I was on my bike, heading along the main coastal road, soaking in the cheers of the crowd before turning onto the long stretch uphill towards Mt Pleasant. Again - spectators lining the road, cheering us all the way up the long, gentle climb.

You know what the best part of a climb is (for me, at least)? When it's done and you point downhill! I absolutely SCREAMED down Mt Pleasant toward the flat(ish) section of road 'til the turnaround. We were out of town and spectators were sparse. I made sure I was following my nutrition plan (more on that later), and tried to avoid pushing too hard. The bike performed flawlessly all day (except for a nagging creak - it's going to the shop to get checked out).

On each of the three laps, I saw my mom just as I came into town. She set up camp at a special station for 'team assistance' and she helped me refuel at Formula 1 pitstop speeds by swapping out my empty bottles for full ones. She wasn't only cheerleading - she had an active role in making sure I did well on the bike! After the pitstop, I rolled through town, through the cheering masses. What an incredible atmosphere!

As I started Lap 2 I started to get a bit of stomach pain, which sort of worked itself out throughout the lap. I stopped at one of the restrooms at an aid station, which also helped. And about half-way along the lap, I was feeling fine - and all of a sudden, another lap and a half of the course seemed completely manageable. I just kept the pedals moving, kept myself fed, and made my way around. I slowed down a bit on the third lap because I'd pushed a bit too hard, and with a few km to the end of the bike course I started to feel I hadn't brought enough nutrition... I didn't come up short by too much, but it's something to keep in mind for the next one!

About one km from the end of the bike, though, just as I was mentally preparing myself for the run, I got a cramp in my right leg. I smoothed it out by light pedaling and on-bike massaging, but it's not a good sign to cramp right before a marathon!

Knowing I needed to take it easy, I went into Transition and took my time - applied sunscreen, put anti-chafing cream on my feet, and generally gave myself an opportunity to rest. I started the run with completely tired legs, and after about 8 km I had no energy left and had to walk. About a km later, Mark passed me, and when I tried to run alongside him, my legs said 'no!'... so off he went, into the distance.

I managed to run at a slow pace, and walked myself through the aid stations where they had water, cold sponges, powerade, gels, and other goodies - including little sandwiches that looked like they had jam (but turned out to be marmite!)... but as I completed the first lap I was sapped, and realized I needed to walk for a while to let myself recover. My legs were on fire, and I couldn't keep up my running form anymore. However, I made a point to keep myself moving - even if I was walking - and to never stop advancing.

Half-way through the run course, I made a deal with myself: I'd run one km, and walk the next. After alternating a few times, I saw I was actually ok, so I bumped the run section up to 2 km. I started doing mental math to figure out what that meant for the finish - whether I'd run the last km or two, and whether it was lame to walk at km 40, when I was so close to the finish line. I kept the debate up in my head, wondering whether I could maybe run the last four km.

And, before long, the 32 km marker was in front of me - only 10 to go. And at that point, I remembered how proud an accomplishment it had been for me to run 10 km in Miami, only a handful of years ago. I remembered all the long, painful training days. I thought of how far I'd come physically and emotionally. I remembered how distant the goal of completing an Ironman had been just a few months ago, and how close I was to actually seeing it happen. I'd already covered 216 km (!!!) by that point - a mere 10k was just a hop and a skip away, or so I convinced myself. So I ran. I still slowed down through the aid stations to take a few sips of Coke, but those last 10k belonged to me. The last 4 km were pretty straight, and as I peered up I saw the moon, which had been blocked by my hat's visor. How poetic - my day had started by swimming towards the sun, and it was ending by running towards the moon.

When I reached the final 50m and saw the finish line, I swelled up with emotions - I could barely contain myself from the excitement, satisfaction, exhaustion, and thrill of reaching the finish line. I saw Lesley, my mom and Mark cheering from the sidelines, and went over to give them a great big hug - and afterwards, I got my finishers medal from none other than Chrissie Wellington, 3-time Ironman World Champion and the winner of Sunday's race. I finished in 12:45, a bit slower than my target but certainly a time to be proud of!

I felt elated as I crossed the finish line - exhausted physically, but completely elevated mentally. It had been a difficult day (they don't call it Ironman for nothing), but at no point during the race did I doubt my ability to finish - it may sound arrogant to say so, or it may just simply be the result of months to get my mind and my body ready for the race. To a certain extent, though, I think my belief in my ability to finish was what gave me the strength to actually finish - and those last 10k showed me that, by digging deep, I could find a lot more energy and strength than I thought I had.

A word on Chrissie Wellington: she'd had a big day, too - 3rd out of the water, she smashed the bike course record for women, ran the fastest Ironman ever by a woman, and ran the fastest marathon of the day, faster even than Ray Tissink, the male winner. And there she was, many hours later, congratulating and hanging medals around the necks of us slowpokes - and she stayed 'til midnight. Also, on Friday, there was a woman's 10k race - Mark and I had been out for a short run, and we ran on a path that went alongside the race course. Also on a training run was Chrissie, applauding and cheering the racers on. Pure class!

So, some of the more technical stuff, for those of you who are interested:

Triathlon is a sport of equipment. There really is a LOT of stuff you need to remember on raceday, and I spent a good time planning and preparing and going though check-lists to make sure everything was in place for the big day. The bike was in a rack in the transition area. The rest of my bike gear (helmet, shoes, sunglasses) were in one bag, and my running gear (running shoes, socks, and hat) were in another. And that's the big stuff - lots of other small little things to keep track of, too - anti-chafing cream, sunblock, gels, the race belt to hold the race number... the list goes on and on.

And, at Ironman distance, triathlon is also a sport of nutrition. I burn roughly 800 calories an hour at race pace - and at almost 13 hours' worth of racing, that's a LOT of calories! And that's only a part of it - as you race, you sweat - especially on a losing salt and other crucial electrolytes. And as you push your muscles on such long distances, your muscle tissue begins to break down, partly through strain, partly through cannibalization - so you need to replenish protein and aminoacids. The problem is, your stomach can't process nearly as many calories as you're using up - so you necessarily need to run at a deficit for the day. The key is to keep blood sugar up, especially through complex carbs that provide 'sustained' energy instead of a sugar spike from simple carbs.

My nutrition plan included a sports drink that has protein, electrolyte capsules to avoid salt deficiency, water and powerade at the aid stations, bananas and potatoes along the race course for complex carbs and potassium, and Coca-Cola for the last lap of the run. Coke is a one-way street - once you switch to simple carbs, you need to keep them up to avoid a sugar crash - but the flavor is delicious, the caffeine is a great boost, and as long as you can keep yourself well supplied, you're fine.

So, there you have it - after all those months of training, after all those hours of racing, after all those gels and Clif bars and stuff that counts as nutrition but barely counts as food I finally heard the words: "Francisco, you are an Ironman!"

Cheers, thanks for reading, and above all thanks for all the support!
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