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Old 06-04-2011, 06:57 AM   #20536
rhys
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I'm an old phat newbie..... just bought my first bicycle (Touring road bike) in 30 years. Only 80 miles under my belly so far..... took me a week to there though. So I know purists will poo poo me for having done this, but I gotta know 'why' exactly (given as how it's raining today, I can't get out for a ride and find out for myself.....):

I took my bike to REI yesterday and had them stick in those SLIME puncture-resistant liners that go between the tire & innertube. Given as how I'm seriously overweight (one of the main reasons I bought a bicycle at age 57), and because I likely don't know better or would even 'feel' the difference..... what's the big deal about the "added weight" of these liners if I'm already a phatphuck?

Speaking of which (added weight), when I get to the point of being able to do an hour of non-stop pedalling, could I benefit from loading my handlebar bag, tail-pack, and cages with additional weight? I wanna lose lotsa weight, I wanna get to the point of joining local cycle groups for organized rides, and I want someday to anxiously complain about the price of a sexy new 'good' road bike(!).

What say y'all??
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Old 06-04-2011, 07:43 AM   #20537
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A lot of people get OCD real quick about counting weight. Honestly, for the style of cycling you're doing it's not going to matter. Now, if you start racing and want to start moving up in the cats (categories), you'll need to start watching cycle weight.

I wouldn't worry about the extra weight of the tire liners. But I would learn how to change & patch a tube.

I don't think you should put weight in your bags. You should find steeper hills to ride, and put food in your bags instead.
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Old 06-04-2011, 08:07 AM   #20538
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Originally Posted by YakSpout View Post
I'm a n00b roadie (only been riding one bike for 4 years) and just got a newer bike (with proper fit) a few months ago. I'm also tall (6'4") and fairly long-legged (35" inseam) compared to some of the riders I know. The 170 cranks on the last bike seemed to spin out more quickly. The newer bike with 175s seems to have a bit more reach. I don't know if that makes sense.... Maybe some of the older salts here have some better input, but for me, the longer cranks are more comfortable. I really should have my old bike (60cm frame) measured up against my new bike (61.5cm frame) to see where the differences are... But I tend to just want to pedal. I'll never be a racer and I understand that. but it would be interesting to see what a pro says.
I'm no pro.

With the shorter cranks, the pedals are travelling in a smaller circle and cover less distance than a longer crank. Therefore, theoretically, one can spin a higher cadence with the shorties. However, you gotta' ride what feels right. As an adult, spinning the crank length of a tricycle will never feel right.

On a side note, the LBS owner used to be a fairly competitive racer with a team. As a joke on one of the other racers, he swapped the guy's crank arms out to a 165 on one side and a 180 on the other. He said the guy never noticed. Obviously, the "punch line" didn't work as planned.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fullmonte View Post
WTF is up with BMX bike prices? I don't understand why these things don't depreciate like other bikes. Newish or old doesn't seem to matter. They're all 300-500 bucks for a decent bike. I took my 6 year old son to the LBS last week and he really liked the Haros, but I'm not spending that kinda dosh on a bike he'll outgrow like he does his shoes. His current ride, a Mao Mart Spider Man themed China junker has a taco'd wheel, and he's ready for something decent. Back in the mid 80's, as a sixth grader, I bought a Team Murray X20r POS for $50 from a friend and rode the piss out of it at the local BMX practice track for a couple of years. Why are used kiddie bikes so damn expensive nowadays?
Get him into one of the nice 20-inchers. He can ride that well into his teen years.....and beyond. Also, he could ride that one on the trails with you. Most importantly, give the kid some dignity and get him off the Spiderman bike. Those are so pre-school.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rhys View Post
I'm an old phat newbie..... just bought my first bicycle (Touring road bike) in 30 years. Only 80 miles under my belly so far..... took me a week to there though. So I know purists will poo poo me for having done this, but I gotta know 'why' exactly (given as how it's raining today, I can't get out for a ride and find out for myself.....):

I took my bike to REI yesterday and had them stick in those SLIME puncture-resistant liners that go between the tire & innertube. Given as how I'm seriously overweight (one of the main reasons I bought a bicycle at age 57), and because I likely don't know better or would even 'feel' the difference..... what's the big deal about the "added weight" of these liners if I'm already a phatphuck?

Speaking of which (added weight), when I get to the point of being able to do an hour of non-stop pedalling, could I benefit from loading my handlebar bag, tail-pack, and cages with additional weight? I wanna lose lotsa weight, I wanna get to the point of joining local cycle groups for organized rides, and I want someday to anxiously complain about the price of a sexy new 'good' road bike(!).

What say y'all??
Nobody makes fun of another in that way here. We're all cycle enthusiasts. As such, the childish bullshit has kept away from this thread....thankfully.

On a lightweight (14-16lbs) racebike, one can really feel the rotating mass of heavier wheels, tubes, and tires. They don't accelerate as easily and they do slow agile handling a bit. However, on a heavier bike, it's not quite as noticeable. The most important side-effect of those liners will be a reduction in ride quality. When you add thickness to the tire, it becomes less supple and doesn't conform to bumps as well. If I remember correctly, your Novara has really good tires on it.....Vittorias or Contis(?). You shouldn't have any issues with flats with those tires, as they're already puncture resitant by design.

As for adding weight to your bike, I wouldn't. I'd just ride more miles and take the opportunity to see more countryside. Afterall, you're earning the ability to ride longer and further. Enjoy it!
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Old 06-04-2011, 08:39 AM   #20539
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ducnut View Post
Get him into one of the nice 20-inchers. He can ride that well into his teen years.....and beyond. Also, he could ride that one on the trails with you. Most importantly, give the kid some dignity and get him off the Spiderman bike. Those are so pre-school.
The fact of the matter is he loves that silly Spiderman bike, taco wheel included. The boy looks like a drunk weaving down the street while riding in a straight line. We also have a Superman bike (for little brother)with good wheels and he refuses to ride it.
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Old 06-04-2011, 08:54 AM   #20540
rhys
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thanks guys!

Maybe a rough ride (via my hardened tires with the SLIME dealies) on this newbie/tender butt will toughen me up (painfully) sooner. The seat has been replaced with an inexpensive gel Specialized of a suitable size, the local cycle Guru has dialed things in for my current (begginer) level of experience and my (lack of) equipment..... so as y'all are suggesting,

I'll just get out and ride, find some hills, and carry some beer and leftover pizza with which to fuel my ride back to the car........
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Old 06-04-2011, 09:41 AM   #20541
pierce
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a 6 yr old is not going to be comfortable riding a teen-sized BMX bike.

the decent BMX bikes are so expensive because they are built to be virtually indestructible while being hucked around by one of the most destructive forces in nature, a human male adolescent.
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Old 06-04-2011, 09:51 AM   #20542
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rhys View Post
thanks guys!

Maybe a rough ride (via my hardened tires with the SLIME dealies) on this newbie/tender butt will toughen me up (painfully) sooner. The seat has been replaced with an inexpensive gel Specialized of a suitable size, the local cycle Guru has dialed things in for my current (begginer) level of experience and my (lack of) equipment..... so as y'all are suggesting,

I'll just get out and ride, find some hills, and carry some beer and leftover pizza with which to fuel my ride back to the car........
I must say, I am not a fan of slime, or even those puncture liners you put between the tubes and tires.... Weight on the rims is way amplified in riding effort vs weight on the frame or rider.

I'm also a fairly heavy guy (6', 220 lbs), and fixed up my recycled-from-parts hybrid around-town rider with nice sturdy 700x38c tires, using the sorts of tires that have a kevlar anti-puncture layer in them. I like the 38's as they are usable on dirt (as long as I keep my weight over the back wheel, I can even ride over nasty mud with the slicks I've been using), but they roll nicely on pavement and give some good speed..

I just put new 38c semi-slicks on this thing as my old ones had a rotting gumwalls, and these new ones are fatter and heavier than the same size different brand tires I took off so I have yet to see how that works. at least they clear the frame, and felt great on my short test ride around my property.

I'm going to have to get new wheels. last spring, I got some really cheap 700c hybrid wheels (from REI, hah!), and the really cheap made-in-china 'shimano' hubs already feel gritty, the 1" wide rims are already out of true, and the galavanized spokes already look like crap. I'm thinking of looking into some 29er kinda rims, as they'd likely be stronger than the cheap hybrid stuff.

hey, anyone have any suggestion for fatter-than-roadracer 700c wheels suitable for 32-38c tires, that can handle a heavy rider bouncing around on the dirt but aren't too expensive? I don't want rims over 25mm outer width (which is what I have now). I'm a fan of 36 spoke 3-cross for strength, and would prefer sealed bearing hubs and stainless heavy gauge double butted spokes..
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Old 06-04-2011, 03:46 PM   #20543
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When I lived in Colorado my Mountain bike wore Mister Tuffy Tire liners. The Goats head thorns are amazing out there. Here in the OC, I have not bothered.
For fitness the added weight is trumped by the less flats thing.

Almost all of my flats out here have been from crappy cheap tubes tearing up at the stem. Usually while I pump them up in the garage. One tube I tore in half pulling it out of its roll.

What I would advise is learn to change the tires yourself, then never ever have a shop do it again.
It is simple and not at all hard, once you get the tricks down.

At my advanced age of 58 I learned a new trick. I put the partially inflated tube in the tire, then tire onto the rim. Very fast. Plus you are forced to start at the stem. Cool trick I learned at the LBS, when they trued my rim, (I needed a special tool to get at the spokes, and I got that too.)

As soon as my first summer cold is gone, I get to ride again. I'm looking forward to that. The weather here is perfect.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rhys View Post
I'm an old phat newbie..... just bought my first bicycle (Touring road bike) in 30 years. Only 80 miles under my belly so far..... took me a week to there though. So I know purists will poo poo me for having done this, but I gotta know 'why' exactly (given as how it's raining today, I can't get out for a ride and find out for myself.....):

I took my bike to REI yesterday and had them stick in those SLIME puncture-resistant liners that go between the tire & innertube. Given as how I'm seriously overweight (one of the main reasons I bought a bicycle at age 57), and because I likely don't know better or would even 'feel' the difference..... what's the big deal about the "added weight" of these liners if I'm already a phatphuck?

Speaking of which (added weight), when I get to the point of being able to do an hour of non-stop pedalling, could I benefit from loading my handlebar bag, tail-pack, and cages with additional weight? I wanna lose lotsa weight, I wanna get to the point of joining local cycle groups for organized rides, and I want someday to anxiously complain about the price of a sexy new 'good' road bike(!).

What say y'all??
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Old 06-04-2011, 04:13 PM   #20544
pierce
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Head View Post
Almost all of my flats out here have been from crappy cheap tubes tearing up at the stem. Usually while I pump them up in the garage. One tube I tore in half pulling it out of its roll.

What I would advise is learn to change the tires yourself, then never ever have a shop do it again.
It is simple and not at all hard, once you get the tricks down.

At my advanced age of 58 I learned a new trick. I put the partially inflated tube in the tire, then tire onto the rim. Very fast. Plus you are forced to start at the stem.
I like to put just enough air in the tube to make it round and put it in the tire before mounting. I always center the valve stem on the tire labels (just cuz it makes it easier to find the stem). sprocket side up, I put one side of the tire on the rim, make sure the tube is fully inboard, then start the other side at the stem, and work both sides over the rim... pinching the tire on the stem side (with the stem pushed as far into the rim as it will go) and the bead drops into the groove between the beads, pulling the tire down and away from me (and the stem) and almost all tires will just pop on the rim. then I make sure the stem is happy in the middle/straight, and not canted before I continue...

then... What I like to do... I put about 15-20 psi in the tire, and carefully inspect it all the way around the rim, making sure the ridge near the bead is equidistant from the edge of the rim, and pushing/twisting/pulling on the tire til its evenly seated. if anything is funky, I'll let that 15-20psi out, and start over. when its all nice and symmetrical at 15-20psi, THEN I pump it up to whatever running pressure I want, and inspect it one more time. when I put the wheel back on the bike, I'll spin the wheels a few time to see if the tire is true all the way around, and sometimes let the air out and do the reseat thing *again*...

like to do. famous last words. slapping a pair of Victorria Rubino 23C on my skinny daughter's skinny hybrid (90's aluminum frame trek road bike converted to a hybrid), I couldn't get the back tire mounted to save my ass, without using my tire irons. i'd just mounted 3 other tires and was bored and tired, so I short circuited my inspection, just gave it a quick lookover at 20psi and pumped it up....

and sure enough.... a week later, we're up in the Sierras camping at a music festival, and her back wheel was *really* low on air, wtf. pumped it back up to 100psi and heard a little hiss, aw fwak. pop wheel off, get the tire off, and there's a 2" long crack/rip where the tube was pinched against the bottom of the bead. no prob, I brought a patch kit camping.... dig it out. wtf, there's 2 2cm and 4 1cm patches, oh geezus. so I put the two fat ones on one at a time, overlapping by as little as I felt safe, then put two small ones on the end, JUST covering the rip ends.... slapped this back on her bike (and didn't need irons this time) and wow, it held air. week later, its still at 110psi. hah!
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Old 06-04-2011, 06:18 PM   #20545
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rhys View Post
thanks guys!

Maybe a rough ride (via my hardened tires with the SLIME dealies) on this newbie/tender butt will toughen me up (painfully) sooner. The seat has been replaced with an inexpensive gel Specialized of a suitable size, the local cycle Guru has dialed things in for my current (begginer) level of experience and my (lack of) equipment..... so as y'all are suggesting,

I'll just get out and ride, find some hills, and carry some beer and leftover pizza with which to fuel my ride back to the car........

Like they said before Just ride it pretty soon you'll be riding a couple hours at a time and you'll see a lot weight will drop off you like liposuction.

Good luck and have fun.
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Old 06-04-2011, 06:32 PM   #20546
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Originally Posted by Mr Head View Post
When I lived in Colorado my Mountain bike wore Mister Tuffy Tire liners. The Goats head thorns are amazing out there.........


THERE IS NO ESCAPE!!

BWAAA HAA HAAAAA!!!!!!!

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Old 06-04-2011, 07:39 PM   #20547
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My urban thrasher bike (go ahead, steal it. Good luck finding parts) wears mr. tuffy tire liners. I like 'em. Keeps out the glass, anyway.

I like to put baby powder inside my tire/rim/tube/liner combo.
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Old 06-05-2011, 05:02 AM   #20548
mgorman
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Weight Loss

Ride all day without raising your heart rate will not get you far. Ride with an elevated heart rate will. This way you know your body is burning fuel and not just burning off what you ate for lunch



Yesterdays race I averaged 150bpm for 6h:15m and burned off 3300 calories according to Garmin.


Crank Arms

Short people tend to benefit from shorter cranks as tall people longer. I have bikes with cranks ranging from 165mm to 185mm. It depends a lot on your riding style, if you are a spinner, go shorter, masher, go longer (to a point). The shorter arm let your feet travel a smaller path making it easier to spin. Spinning a big crank isn't as easy however, in theory, supposed to give you leverage. I tell people to use what feels comfortable. I'm tall so I can spin a 175 pretty well.


Mr Tuffy

If your tuffy's have square edges at the ends, use a grinding wheel or sand paper to taper them. Mine ate a hole through the tube it was supposed to be protecting If you are only training, and riding for pleasure, use Tuffys and slime, why ruin a good ride with a road side repair. Worry about weight when you become competitive. I've slimed mtb tires and tufo sealed road tires for certain races with no side affects. Tufo sealer kept me in one race where I got 3 punctures. You'll know because the stuff flies out all over you and the competition!
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Old 06-05-2011, 07:23 AM   #20549
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You'll know because the stuff flies out all over you and the competition!
I bet that makes you the popular one in the peloton.
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Old 06-05-2011, 08:21 AM   #20550
Gaston Gagne
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Vuelta Arana

They are back!


Mwah!

























Must get the serum to those children...

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