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Old 10-05-2013, 05:21 AM   #31441
mgorman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Squelch View Post
I've just started cycling in the past couple of weeks, and I've got a few questions for the masses. . (Or maybe it's just that I'm 40, and they're probably not quite that old...)

Anyway, this cycling thing is awesome. I'm glad I spent the money to get a good bike.
Your 1st line is the answer. quality saddle time (not necessarily quantity) will help everything.

The smaller chain ring in the front is your climbing gear. Don't always force the big gear, your knees will pay the price. Some guys think it's manly to never use the little ring but they typically avoid big hills so they don't get left behind. Cross chaining is bad, don't use the big to big or small to small combinations, you'll put unwanted stress on the drivetrain.

Most of our fast guys are in their 40's, you just need time. Get a good 2 well to a month of getting acquainted with your bike, make sure the fit is correct then ease into a training plan or hard work outs

Just riding hard all the time can backfire. You need to mix relaxing rides with intervals and specific workouts throughout the week. 2 hard rides a week are plenty, each one followed by an easy day. Recovery is important.

Also, don't let anyone talk you into spending all your money on upgrading, wear the stuff out 1st. The lightest bike in the world won't do squat if you weigh 300lbs or have bird legs.

Enjoy the ride


-

Michael
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mgorman screwed with this post 10-05-2013 at 05:28 AM
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Old 10-05-2013, 11:44 AM   #31442
pierce
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Originally Posted by Squelch View Post
First, what's a good sped to be pedaling? I just finished a 29-mile ride, and was pedaling constantly the whole time. Sometimes I was in a high (low?) gear and pedaling slowly, and sometimes I'd drop it down a gear to pedal faster, even though I was going the same basic speed. Is this a personal preference thing, or is there a "right" answer?
your cadence should probably be in the 60-90 full turns per minute range. this is known as 'spinning', you stay in a relatively low gear and keep your RPM's up. this requires better cardiovascular rather than brute strength muscle, and will take some time to build up, but your knees will thank you... 'mashers' blow their knees out early by relying on brute force (its also really hard on the bicycle drive train).

re gear rings. I'm assuming you have 2 chainrings in front from your description? I'll use my big ring in all but the 2 largest rear cogs. I'll never use my small front ring in the small 3 rear cogs.

If I'm climbing and I know I'll be needing lower gears, I'll drop into the small ring when I'm still in the middle of the rear cassette (and simultaneously shift the rear back up 1-2 gears so its effectively the same gear or close), that way I can end up all the way in my lowest gear when I hit those extended 8+ % grades. that double shift takes a little extra time and must be done with light pressure on the pedals, so I plan ahead.
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Old 10-05-2013, 03:03 PM   #31443
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On level ground or descents I'm spinning 95-105 rpm. A little higher when riding in a group.

Higher pedalling rpms make it easier to repsond to small accellerations that happen in a group or attacks in a race.

But it is more important for saving the leg muscles. Think of it this way- what's harder, 10 bicep curls with a 40lb weight or 20 with a 20lb weight? Pedaling at low rpm is like trying to lift big weights. Your muscles get tired fast.

However don't pedal so fast that you start bouncing in the saddle. You want to be smooth. It may take time to be able to pedal comfortably at higher rpms; pedalling is not a natural motion. I have been riding seriously for 25 years and I'm still working on my pedal stroke.

Since you're just beginning don't worry about training. You can make a chore out of riding later. :)
For now, anything that you do on the bike will be improving something. So just go out and have fun.

HR varies a lot between individuals. MaxHR will decrease with age but even with two people the same age and fitness putting out the same power one's HR may be 20 bpm different than the others. Comparing HR between individuals is useless. Strava calculated power is also very inaccurate (unless up a long steep climb with no wind) and should not be used to compare with other riders.
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Old 10-05-2013, 03:43 PM   #31444
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Originally Posted by mgorman View Post
Also, don't let anyone talk you into spending all your money on upgrading, wear the stuff out (or break it) 1st. The lightest bike in the world won't do squat if you don't ride.
This

Quote:
Enjoy the ride

Michael
...and this too

I've got bikes that range in weight from 15# to 22#. On the flats, I end up going the same speed on all of em. I may be a bit slower on the uphill on the heavy bike, but when I'm on that one, how fast or slow I am isn't a priority I'm out smelling the roses.

M
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Old 10-05-2013, 05:10 PM   #31445
El Guero
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22 pounds is heavy? my favorite bike weighs 34 pounds, probably more with the luggage I've always got on it. Course I weigh a bit myself so...

I had a cold the last few days and haven't touched any of the bikes in three days. I'm already feeling like I'll have forgotten how to pedal when I get back on

Random question: Once the roads here start getting salty, do I need to leave the steel touring bike in the garage and stick to the aluminum bike? Both have fenders.
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Old 10-05-2013, 05:56 PM   #31446
TheYeti
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Originally Posted by El Guero View Post
22 pounds is heavy? my favorite bike weighs 34 pounds, probably more with the luggage I've always got on it. Course I weigh a bit myself so...

I had a cold the last few days and haven't touched any of the bikes in three days. I'm already feeling like I'll have forgotten how to pedal when I get back on

Random question: Once the roads here start getting salty, do I need to leave the steel touring bike in the garage and stick to the aluminum bike? Both have fenders.
My LHT weighs 30# without the racks,Racks and water I'll bet i'm pushing 40#, but that's what those little tiny gears are for And really when I'm in shape (which is not now) 15 mph pace isn't really all that hard
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Old 10-05-2013, 05:59 PM   #31447
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Badass!

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Old 10-05-2013, 05:59 PM   #31448
TheYeti
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Originally Posted by Gummee! View Post

RIDE WHAT YOU WANT JUST ............. see below


No you need to do what the video says
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Old 10-05-2013, 06:59 PM   #31449
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Gorgeous! Peacock Groove built.


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Old 10-05-2013, 07:03 PM   #31450
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No you need to do what the video says


DON'T USE A PRESSURE WASHER!!!!! More bearings die a premature death via dirt and water blown past seals.
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Old 10-05-2013, 08:24 PM   #31451
TheYeti
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DON'T USE A PRESSURE WASHER!!!!! More bearings die a premature death via dirt and water blown past seals.

Yea I couldn't believe they were using a pressure washer. I could see a stong stream from hose.
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Old 10-05-2013, 08:55 PM   #31452
fullmonte
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Had such a good time railing the new flow trail today... until lap #4, when the rear derailleur snapped right off the bike.

Bent it all to shitThose pesky exposed roots in the runoff area need some trimming.

Got to experience the new prototype Pivot single speed for the ride back to the parking lot.
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Old 10-06-2013, 03:51 AM   #31453
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Thanks for all the advice about cadence, etc. I had a two-hour, 30-mile ride in the rain today. I had to go slowly for a little bit because there was a running race along the path and I didn't want to go screaming past people trying to run for time. I finished the ride at the local bike store, and bought a cadence sensor and some chain oil. When I got home I put the bike in the bathtub and washed it. The joy of being a geographical bachelor is that I can bring a muddy bike into the apartment and wash it in the bathtub. I finished by oiling the chain again, and washing all of my gear too. Good times!

I can't wait until the next time I can ride so I can see what kind of cadence I'm keeping when I ride. I tried using the smaller sprocket on some of the very few hills I rode, and it did seem to make it easier. And I tried using a bit lower gear as I rode.
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Old 10-06-2013, 04:12 AM   #31454
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Yea I couldn't believe they were using a pressure washer. I could see a stong stream from hose.
Those bikes get new chains every couple stages. As for the bearings, they are not in service long enough to get anywhere close to worn out. Plus, they have a whole truck load of spares.

For the rest of us, washing our own bikes and riding them until the parts do wear out, and replacing them with stuff we have to actually buy, yes streams of high pressure water directed to the rotating parts isn't a good idea.
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Old 10-06-2013, 04:13 AM   #31455
pierce
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if you wash a bike in water, you need to really dry it thoroughly before you lube it. when I was a bachelor and an all weather rider, I parked my bike over the floor register in my apartment to 'blow dry' it.
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