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Old 10-12-2013, 08:12 PM   #31651
wvridgerider
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Location: west virginia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trailer Rails View Post
60 miles today from Pittsburgh to Connelsville.




Short ride to Rockwood tomorrow. About 45 miles.
I always wanted to ride the complete GAP. I am from the Pittsburgh area and visit a few times a year.
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Old 10-12-2013, 11:25 PM   #31652
squish
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bloodweiser View Post
Need some help here folks.

I have a mountain bike, that I've had for 15 years now,
which hasn't gotten much use since I was 17.


Let's pretend I have $200 to spend.
I'm going to guess that CL is my best bet.


Thank you all,
If you can swing $400 it moves you much further up the used bike ladder. And if you work the end of season sales year end post xmass you can get some screaming deals on new left over bikes.

The cycling market is sliced up just like motorcycles are.
In bicycles you have
Race bikes
High performance road bikes
Fitness road bikes
Long distance or charity ride bikes
Comfort or cruisers
Hybrids
Urban
Cyclocross
Flat bar road bike
Time trial or triathlon bike.
And there are blurred lines between lots of em.
But all of the focus on one or two specific areas of riding.

When people ask me way bike to get and they don't know kind of riding the want to do.
I suggest a flat bar road bike, a cyclocross bike or a more comfortable road bike, like a touring or randonne style bike.
All of these bikes are slightly more comfortable to ride and are flexible enough to be fun.

When looking for my new bike
I wanted wideish 700c wheels, more narrow and much taller than my MB but wider and more comfortable than my cross bike.
It has a flat bar but it's got pretty low gearing. Which I need since if I ride anywhere from home it's up a hill.
My cross bike plays the roll of road bike and my hybrid/urban is my everyday ride.
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Old 10-13-2013, 12:07 AM   #31653
fz6kd7
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As for components like wheels is year end the best to
buy or does it matter?
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Old 10-13-2013, 05:02 AM   #31654
trailer Rails
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Quote:
Originally Posted by squish View Post

When people ask me way bike to get and they don't know kind of riding the want to do.
I suggest a flat bar road bike, a cyclocross bike or a more comfortable road bike, like a touring or randonne style bike.
Yes. Flat bar road bike or cyclocross. I have a specialized sirrus and love it.
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Old 10-13-2013, 07:04 AM   #31655
Bloodweiser
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Quote:
Originally Posted by squish View Post
The cycling market is sliced up just like motorcycles are.
In bicycles you have
Race bikes
High performance road bikes
Fitness road bikes
Long distance or charity ride bikes
Comfort or cruisers
Hybrids
Urban
Cyclocross
Flat bar road bike
Time trial or triathlon bike.
And there are blurred lines between lots of em.
But all of the focus on one or two specific areas of riding.

When people ask me way bike to get and they don't know kind of riding the want to do.
I suggest a flat bar road bike, a cyclocross bike or a more comfortable road bike, like a touring or randonne style bike.
All of these bikes are slightly more comfortable to ride and are flexible enough to be fun.
Jeezum,
I always thought there were only 3 types: BMX, MTB, and road.

I guess I'm looking for an all purpose road bike.
Doesn't need to be super fast, as I don't ride with folks.
Good for distance.

Like I said, relatively new here.
I'm in pretty good shape, 5'8" 165lbs.
It's really my lungs that are prolly my weakest link now.

The bike I've been riding has those typical down curvy bars,
which I'm not really into.
Keep my hands on the top anyway.
Hurts my wrist, prolly doing it wrong I guess.

I'm getting into the idea of using my old specialized hardrock
and repurposing it for straight up road duty.
I'll post some pics later, and maybe you FFs can give me some pointers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by trailer Rails View Post
Yes. Flat bar road bike or cyclocross. I have a specialized sirrus and love it.
^googled that.
Looks like a MTB with road tires.
and awesome.

I want to do that.
I just want it to feel fast.
I don't care if it actually is,
but my MTB always seems like its dragging on pavement.
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Old 10-13-2013, 08:17 AM   #31656
ericm
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Flat bars suck for long road rides. You only have one hand position. After some hours that's a problem. I did my first century on a MTB (my road bike broke) and by the end I was in serious pain all the way up through my shoulders. My legs were fine.
But even adding bar ends helps a lot.

Road bikes look like road bikes for a reason. Actually two reasons: comfort and efficiency. Even road racers need comfort as their races are 3-6 hours long. If your bike is hurting you by the end of that it will impact your performance.

If you're riding exclusively on the tops of drop bars you're doing it wrong. You also have the brake hoods and the drops. In those positions you have better control and can use the brakes. The bike you're riding probably doesn't fit you, and that would explain the wrist pain. If the saddle is too far forwards relative to the bottom bracket you will have too much weight on your hands.
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Old 10-13-2013, 10:28 AM   #31657
Eugene
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bloodweiser View Post
Jeezum,
I always thought there were only 3 types: BMX, MTB, and road.

I guess I'm looking for an all purpose road bike.
Doesn't need to be super fast, as I don't ride with folks.
Good for distance.

Like I said, relatively new here.
I'm in pretty good shape, 5'8" 165lbs.
It's really my lungs that are prolly my weakest link now.

The bike I've been riding has those typical down curvy bars,
which I'm not really into.
Keep my hands on the top anyway.
Hurts my wrist, prolly doing it wrong I guess.

I'm getting into the idea of using my old specialized hardrock
and repurposing it for straight up road duty.
I'll post some pics later, and maybe you FFs can give me some pointers.



^googled that.
Looks like a MTB with road tires.
and awesome.

I want to do that.
I just want it to feel fast.
I don't care if it actually is,
but my MTB always seems like its dragging on pavement.
I sorta went through this a few years ago. Is your MTB a 26er? I went from a 26" MTB with road oriented tires to a road oriented hybrid. It has a road oriented frame/fork/700c wheels, mountain bike components, and a flat bar. It feels faster, is faster, more flexible(rack/fender mounts), more efficient, and is more fun to ride on the road than the 26" MTB was. The difference was immediate when I went to the LBS and test rode it. A road bike would be even more of a difference, especially if you're riding longer distances, like ericm said about the drops.
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Old 10-13-2013, 03:08 PM   #31658
Bloodweiser
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The ol gal



It's a 26er,
if that means it has 26" rims.
Some rusty spokes from it's life with my sister in RI.



Is it a PITA to fit larger wheels? Expense?

I didn't see anything stamped on the crank,
but it has 42 teeth on the big one.

I'm going to take it on my usual loop tomorrow,
and then see what I have to think about it.

Don't know if it's too small for me either,
if I'm flat footed, the top bar just grazes my balls.
On the bike, feel pretty at home.
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Old 10-13-2013, 03:24 PM   #31659
fz6kd7
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no larger wheels just narrower for the street
if you feel good on the bike its the right size

road bike outlet
bike tires direct
modern bike

is who i've been ordering from
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Old 10-13-2013, 03:25 PM   #31660
pierce
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you can't put 700c wheels on a 26" frame... if nothing else, the brakes won't reach the rims.

you could put 26x1.5" or so slicks on those rims, that would be your best bet, and run a little higher pressure.

42T is the classic LOW front gear on a older 2xN road racing bike (with a 52T big front gear). newer bikes tend to run 50-34 (compact) or 53-39 (standard) fronts, the 50T compact is typically paired with an 11T small rear gear to give about the same gear ratio as a 53:12.
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Old 10-14-2013, 08:03 AM   #31661
ducnut
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fz6kd7 View Post
As for components like wheels is year end the best to
buy or does it matter?
Doesn't seem to matter, unless a groupset is being updated the next year. I help out around VeloMine, who truly have over 500 sets of wheels in stock. Their eBay store is massive. If you don't see it, call them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bloodweiser View Post

(Specialized Sirrus)

^googled that.
Looks like a MTB with road tires.
and awesome.

I want to do that.
I just want it to feel fast.
I don't care if it actually is,
but my MTB always seems like its dragging on pavement.
The Sirrus is not a MTB, in any way. It's a road bike with a flat bar. A MTB is built way heavier and with different geometry. The Sirrus is very fast and efficient. Head down to your local Specialized dealer and take one out. It'll surprise you how slow and inefficient your current ride is.

Where in upstate are you?
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Old 10-14-2013, 09:11 AM   #31662
Eugene
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This may be a weird question that can only be answered by riding one but how offroad worthy are cycloss bikes? I have a MTB and have both a rigid carbon fork and suspension fork for it. I rode the rigid setup for quite a while before putting the suspension fork on it. The difference was obviously night and day.

I do miss riding it with the rigid fork sometimes. That got me thinking. I have a Trek 7.3 and it has a road frame, wheels, and aluminum fork. I mounted some cyclocross tires on it the other day and hit a local mild trail. The reason I did this was to see if maybe something along the lines of a cyclocross might be a good replacement for the 7.3. I knew it would be harsh but I wasn't expecting it to be as harsh as it was. It's much more harsh than the MTB with rigid fork. The MTB does have high volume tires.

So back to the question. How offroad worthy are cyclocross bikes? I'm guessing I would need a larger volume tire. The ones I mounted were labeled 35c but measured out to around 30. Would something like a 40c tire help much? I think I may be barking up the wrong tree here. I was looking for a more well rounded bike to replace the 7.3 but if a cyclocross isn't right for at least my local trail, it's probably not worth looking into.
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Old 10-14-2013, 09:41 AM   #31663
Bloodweiser
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ducnut View Post
The Sirrus is not a MTB, in any way. It's a road bike with a flat bar. A MTB is built way heavier and with different geometry. The Sirrus is very fast and efficient. Head down to your local Specialized dealer and take one out. It'll surprise you how slow and inefficient your current ride is.

Where in upstate are you?
30 minutes east of Albany.


Took the MTB on my loop today.
Jesus fuck.
I was straining on the straights,
and ended up having to hoof it at one point.
So demoralizing.

I had the seat jacked up as high as it could go,
apparently I've grown a lot since I was 17 or whatever.
Bike felt cramped,
bars too close or something.

Looked at road tires,
but I'd end up spending something near or north of $50.
Might as well save that and put it towards a new (to me) road bike.
I can keep using my bud's road bike until then.

So looking at CL,
should I just try to find a ride that fits me and my budget?
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Old 10-14-2013, 10:02 AM   #31664
Aurelius
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bloodweiser View Post

Looked at road tires,
but I'd end up spending something near or north of $50.
Might as well save that and put it towards a new (to me) road bike.
I can keep using my bud's road bike until then.
I started off with a mtb and thought I could turn it into a decent road bike just by putting a set of road tires on it. Didn't work. No matter what you do to a mtb, it will suck on pavement. Buying a real road bike is the way to go.

Quote:
should I just try to find a ride that fits me and my budget?
No, that would be foolish.
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Old 10-14-2013, 10:34 AM   #31665
LoJack
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eugene View Post
So back to the question. How offroad worthy are cyclocross bikes? I'm guessing I would need a larger volume tire. The ones I mounted were labeled 35c but measured out to around 30. Would something like a 40c tire help much? I think I may be barking up the wrong tree here. I was looking for a more well rounded bike to replace the 7.3 but if a cyclocross isn't right for at least my local trail, it's probably not worth looking into.
A lot depends on how smooth you are and what type of trails your are on. I have a friend who routinely rides his cross bike with 35's on mtn bike trails, but he tends to shy away from the really rocky ones. When the trail is smooth, twisty, and a reasonable amount of obstacles, he can hold his own out there.
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