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Old 05-20-2014, 03:07 PM   #33496
Mr Head
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I skipped a clincher by clipping my inside pedal on a curve. Hopped the rear a god bit and blew the tube/tire on landing. Didn't fall or slow much but stood it up and headed for shade to change the tube. That was when I pulled a stem out of a brand new tube. Not impressed.


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Old 05-20-2014, 08:22 PM   #33497
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Originally Posted by Mr Head View Post
Park Tool has a lot of information on how to. Also searching any how to question will bring up Sheldon Brown's stuff.
Lots of YouTube.
Gummee! can probably give you the best list of tools.
Tools are easier and easier to list out since I started riding:

2-10mm allen wrenches
BB tool to fit your specific BB (if needed)
Chain tool Get the newest Park bad boy if you're using it in the shop
Cassette lockring tool (Abbey Bike Works if you want bling.)
Chain whip
Big adjustable wrench
T25 wrench
Torque wrench or torque key set to 5nm
Pedal wrench if you have pedals with flats on em. Otherwise a 6mm or 8mm Allen wrench is all you need.
Cable and housing cutter. Felco is what I'm using in the shop. I have a Shimano CL-10 at home that I've had for 20+ years now. Still going strong. Not *quite* gonna last that long in bike shop use.

Workstand. I can't stress enough what a difference having a stand makes. I have a PBS G3. Copy of the Feedback stand basically. Does what it needs to do without costing an arm and a leg.

...and that's pretty much it for general use tools. If you wanna get fancy/dig into your bike more:

Headset press (doubles as a BB86 press too)
Crown race setting tool
Truing stand
Cone wrenches
Brake bleeding equipment for your hydraulic brakes

MOST of the wrenching you'll do on newer bikes is done using an Allen or torx wrench.
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Old 05-20-2014, 08:23 PM   #33498
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Training ride #2 - up Redwood to Skyline, 769 ft climbing in less thna 2 miles http://app.strava.com/activities/143715139

my warm up is going from 11% to 19% grade
http://app.strava.com/activities/143...nts/3283730752
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Old 05-21-2014, 06:18 AM   #33499
Mercury264
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gummee! View Post
Tools are easier and easier to list out since I started riding:

2-10mm allen wrenches
BB tool to fit your specific BB (if needed)
Chain tool Get the newest Park bad boy if you're using it in the shop
Cassette lockring tool (Abbey Bike Works if you want bling.)
Chain whip
Big adjustable wrench
T25 wrench
Torque wrench or torque key set to 5nm
Pedal wrench if you have pedals with flats on em. Otherwise a 6mm or 8mm Allen wrench is all you need.
Cable and housing cutter. Felco is what I'm using in the shop. I have a Shimano CL-10 at home that I've had for 20+ years now. Still going strong. Not *quite* gonna last that long in bike shop use.

Workstand. I can't stress enough what a difference having a stand makes. I have a PBS G3. Copy of the Feedback stand basically. Does what it needs to do without costing an arm and a leg.

...and that's pretty much it for general use tools. If you wanna get fancy/dig into your bike more:

Headset press (doubles as a BB86 press too)
Crown race setting tool
Truing stand
Cone wrenches
Brake bleeding equipment for your hydraulic brakes

MOST of the wrenching you'll do on newer bikes is done using an Allen or torx wrench.
Excellent advice, thanks M

I'm gonna dive into my roller bike this weekend - I think the only tool I need is the BB tool (Shimano - are they all the same ? My roller bike is Tiga is it ? But my good bike is Ultegra - same tool for both ?) - I have most everything else.
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Old 05-21-2014, 08:06 AM   #33500
Gummee!
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Excellent advice, thanks M

I'm gonna dive into my roller bike this weekend - I think the only tool I need is the BB tool (Shimano - are they all the same ? My roller bike is Tiga is it ? But my good bike is Ultegra - same tool for both ?) - I have most everything else.
Depends on the vintage of BB. Hollowtech? Yes. Prior to that? No or maybe.

M
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Old 05-21-2014, 09:39 AM   #33501
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Just called Chris King. Evidently the 'Bontrager by King' hubset I have is NOT 11sp compatible.

Its looking more and more likely I'm gonna be running 10 out of 11 gears in the back on my CX bikes.

...unless someone needs a bunch of 8/9/10 wheels:
Heliums
24/28 King hubs on 24mm chinese tubular rims
24/24 7700 hubs on 38mm chinese tubular rims
32/32 M900 on Mach2 Ceramic tubular rims
28/32 Hugi with Matrix ft/Nemesis rr tubular rims
32/32 Mavic 571/2 on Reflex Ceramics clincher rims
32/32 7403 on Open SUP Ceramic clincher rims

The other option is to start buying hubs and relacing things. While I enjoy building wheels, that's a lot of work.

M
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Old 05-21-2014, 12:50 PM   #33502
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I didn't get out for a ride last night.
I dropped by the little shop to see if they had the latex tubes I was after.
Cool guy.
He can order them and usually gets stuff in three days.
So I'll probably put together the funding and go order them from him. I local. Plus he has an Aprilia Mille. Cool.
I can get the tires there as well.

Could be my new LBS.
PIA to get to by bicycle though.
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Old 05-21-2014, 01:23 PM   #33503
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How level should my bike seat be? I got fitted for a neutral position when I got the bike 2 weeks ago. I have 6 rides on it and feel like my weight is all on my hands and i'm sliding forward on the seat.
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Old 05-21-2014, 01:40 PM   #33504
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You should not be sliding off the nose of the saddle.
Part of the weight on your hands, (assuming drop bars position here), is taken by holding yourself up with your torso. i.e. your core. Or in my case, the squishy bit in the middle.
Old school method was to set a yard/meter stick on the saddle. The stick would be level and we'd then adjust the bars down a bit under the stick.
Saddles don't have continuous backs now so that is a tougher call.

Bottom line the saddle should feel neutral, not sliding forward or falling off the back. And the nose should not be putting much pressure on places you don't want pressure.
Saddles can rotate down at the nose over time sometimes depending on how they are adjusted.
Old department store bikes had notches oddly set up to never be in the right place.
I'm assuming you have a seatpost that allows analogue adjustment meaning infinitely variable, rather than digital or finite set points.
Carefully rotate the nose up just a tad. That stick taped to the seat can help see what the amount is out at the bars. Heck you can even put a level on it and see how level it is as a means of adjusting for comfort.
Which is after all part of the reason for adjustments.
Good luck.

Quote:
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How level should my bike seat be? I got fitted for a neutral position when I got the bike 2 weeks ago. I have 6 rides on it and feel like my weight is all on my hands and i'm sliding forward on the seat.
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Old 05-21-2014, 01:43 PM   #33505
Parx400
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Thanks

I think im going to swing by the bike shop and get fitted again. I forgot bike shorts the first time and i'm new at road bikes. How that I have some rides under my belt I think I know what to look for.
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Old 05-21-2014, 03:46 PM   #33506
rbrsddn
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All my bike's seats, I set with a level. Perfectly horizontal. That's what works for me.
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Old 05-21-2014, 03:49 PM   #33507
Parx400
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here is where I am now.

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Old 05-21-2014, 05:23 PM   #33508
zouch
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i don't know how tall you are or whether you're all limbs or torso, but just looking at the bike without seeing the rider on it, my first impression is that that saddle looks a little high relative to the bars, a little too far forward relative to the pedals, and tipped a tiny bit nose-down (though it's hard to tell because the camera is higher than the bike).

i'm going to guess you can't ride hands-free in that configuration with any level of confidence, can you?


cheers!


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here is where I am now.

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Old 05-21-2014, 07:44 PM   #33509
Parx400
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So I went to a different shop that is 4 blocks from my house. This guy was much more detailed in getting me fitted. I walk with my feet out and the bike was set up very neutral. He adjusted the clip ins for the way I walk and moved them back on my feet. Feels so much better. We raised the nose of the seat moved it back and up a bit. I was amazing how much Easyer it was to petal the bike. Last thing is the bars. Those thing on it are super long with lots of drop. We went to more of a standard bar with the same width. Now I'm not reaching for my life. It's like a whole new machine now.
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Old 05-21-2014, 08:02 PM   #33510
TheYeti
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Originally Posted by Parx400 View Post
So I went to a different shop that is 4 blocks from my house. This guy was much more detailed in getting me fitted. I walk with my feet out and the bike was set up very neutral. He adjusted the clip ins for the way I walk and moved them back on my feet. Feels so much better. We raised the nose of the seat moved it back and up a bit. I was amazing how much Easyer it was to petal the bike. Last thing is the bars. Those thing on it are super long with lots of drop. We went to more of a standard bar with the same width. Now I'm not reaching for my life. It's like a whole new machine now.

Good i'm glad you found someone who fitted the bike to you rather than some measurements. Now go out and enjoy the bike.
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