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Old 08-26-2006, 08:56 AM   #856
elchulopadre
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40-mile day #2 complete!

I met my boss and her friend to go for a 20-mile loop... except I had to ride about 10 miles each way to get there. Very nice (as in pretty) roads around here, but they're mostly straight and flat.

Felt good, and today's 40 miles were a lot more manageable than last weekend's. And my clothes already fit a bit looser than before...
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Old 08-26-2006, 09:00 AM   #857
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Photog
My local high-end bike shop had put together a "solution" for me that was megabuck (same deal--finding a threadless 1"). I had to keep telling them that the Bridgestone was a dumpster find. I think it was $18 or so for the adapter...nice and cheap.

I haven't had any problems with either bike I converted. Made a world of difference to have access to all kinds of new bits.
Yeah, probably gonna go that way. So am I correct in assuming that whether you can use a threaded headset or threadless, all depends on the whether the fork is threaded or threadless?

And it has nothing to do with the frame, except for sizing purposes?

(I love this thread!)
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Old 08-26-2006, 09:13 AM   #858
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shoganai
I do too, and I don't ride much any more.


Hey Shogs
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Old 08-26-2006, 09:14 AM   #859
pierce
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Perry
Yeah, probably gonna go that way. So am I correct in assuming that whether you can use a threaded headset or threadless, all depends on the whether the fork is threaded or threadless?

And it has nothing to do with the frame, except for sizing purposes?

(I love this thread!)
the frame's head tube inner diameter determines the size headset you have to use, along with the fork tube outer diameter.

if the forks are threaded, you have to use a threaded headset. I dunno, but I think if I'm using a threaded fork and headset, I'd stick with the old style gooseneck too.
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Old 08-26-2006, 09:20 AM   #860
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pierce
the frame's head tube inner diameter determines the size headset you have to use, along with the fork tube outer diameter.

if the forks are threaded, you have to use a threaded headset. I dunno, but I think if I'm using a threaded fork and headset, I'd stick with the old style gooseneck too.
why the gooseneck? Why not use adaptor?
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Old 08-26-2006, 09:26 AM   #861
Photog
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Perry
Yeah, probably gonna go that way. So am I correct in assuming that whether you can use a threaded headset or threadless, all depends on the whether the fork is threaded or threadless?

And it has nothing to do with the frame, except for sizing purposes?

(I love this thread!)
Yup. It's all based on the steerer tube diameter*. The headset is the interface between that steerer tube and the frame--holds it the steerer tube place while letting it turn. The size is just what was standardized for the headset/steerer. It doesn't really mean anything in terms of the rest of the frame size.

there are, however, some things to be aware of. Let's say you've got a big ol' 61 cm bike, and found a really cool threadless fork setup that came off a 49cm bike. Chances are the steerer tube on the fork has been cut too short for it to be used on your bike. The head tube length matters, in that case, relative to the bike's sizing because the steerer tube is usually cut down for the shorter bikes (shorter head tube).

EDIT: by that I mean head tube diameter + steerer tube...
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Old 08-26-2006, 09:38 AM   #862
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Perry
why the gooseneck? Why not use adaptor?
why not stick with the gooseneck? its fewer parts to replace, and goosenecks off old bikes are dirt cheap at a used bikejunk store.

also, with a gooseneck, you have some latitude in bar height... with the new style stuff, you need to buy different parts for a different height.
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Old 08-26-2006, 11:54 AM   #863
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pierce
why not stick with the gooseneck? its fewer parts to replace, and goosenecks off old bikes are dirt cheap at a used bikejunk store.

also, with a gooseneck, you have some latitude in bar height... with the new style stuff, you need to buy different parts for a different height.
all ya gotta do is change out spacers.

Less chance of getting a stem frozen in yer steerer tube. Ask me how I know about frozen stems.

M
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Old 08-26-2006, 12:03 PM   #864
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gummee!
all ya gotta do is change out spacers.

Less chance of getting a stem frozen in yer steerer tube. Ask me how I know about frozen stems.

M
um. the fork steering tube is cut off on threadless sets, that doesn't leave much room to go up and down.

re: frozen stems, never met one I couldn't unfreeze with a coupla shots of WD40 and a good tap from a hammer. hell, I got the old stem out of my cruiser, and it was a steel stem in steel forks that had been in there since about 1980. and that bike was parked outside for years. in foggy salty pacific grove.
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Old 08-26-2006, 12:20 PM   #865
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pierce
um. the fork steering tube is cut off on threadless sets, that doesn't leave much room to go up and down.

re: frozen stems, never met one I couldn't unfreeze with a coupla shots of WD40 and a good tap from a hammer. hell, I got the old stem out of my cruiser, and it was a steel stem in steel forks that had been in there since about 1980. and that bike was parked outside for years. in foggy salty pacific grove.
That all depends on how you cut the steerer tube, don't it?

'Course, there's always the 'flip the stem over' skool of thought too...

M
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Old 08-26-2006, 03:48 PM   #866
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A few scraps of our team just finished a grinding 71+ mile ride up into the cascade foothills north of the gorge. It was supposed to be 69 miles but an unmarked turn added a couple when no one really wanted it as the temps pushed to 90. Those last two extra miles had a few folks gritting their teeth and bitching. The milkshake is gone. I'm pooped. Time for some cuban food.
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Old 08-26-2006, 04:02 PM   #867
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Well I just ordered a new carbon fork (threadless), headset (same), a set of bars, and a stem - thanks in large part (100% actually) to Gummee's excellent advice.

Chucksbikes.com has some insane deals, at least for what I was looking for.

My entire order, including 3 rolls of bar tape, was $137 shipping included.

Thanks again brother Gum.



Up'd my mileage today - did a 22 miler on the Mtn bike, felt great.

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Old 08-26-2006, 04:28 PM   #868
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Well here is something I thought I would never do but here goes.

My PT has suggested I get a mountain type bike. It will not be a hard core downhill beast, but something like a cross country type.
what I would like is dual suspension, good frame capable of strategic upgrades as my skill, stamina and muscles get back in shape.

What should I look for in suspension geometry and adjustablity?
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Old 08-26-2006, 05:03 PM   #869
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Augie
Well here is something I thought I would never do but here goes.

My PT has suggested I get a mountain type bike. It will not be a hard core downhill beast, but something like a cross country type.
what I would like is dual suspension, good frame capable of strategic upgrades as my skill, stamina and muscles get back in shape.

What should I look for in suspension geometry and adjustablity?
unless you're going to be riding in really rough terrain and bouncing over rocks, stick with a hard tail, you'll get a lot more for the money. Cheap full suspension bikes are crap, and good ones are expensive.

That said, if you do want a full suspension bike, I really like my 2003 Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Disc. great set of components, excellent frame. the forks were too weak for my weight but I was able to put stiffer springs in them. I got mine barely used for $1200.

if you got the moola, the Santa Cruz Superlight or Blur XC are both excellent FS bikes, but expect to spend around $3000 for one thats well equipped.
http://www.santacruzmtb.com/blurxc/
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Old 08-26-2006, 06:06 PM   #870
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Augie
Well here is something I thought I would never do but here goes.

My PT has suggested I get a mountain type bike. It will not be a hard core downhill beast, but something like a cross country type.
what I would like is dual suspension, good frame capable of strategic upgrades as my skill, stamina and muscles get back in shape.

What should I look for in suspension geometry and adjustablity?
Fit is the most important thing, followed closely by a quality frame and components. You can upgrade the components, but if the bike doesn't fit you, it'll suck no matter how much money you throw at it in the farkle department. If it fits, and the frame is decent, it'll be worthy of upgrades for years to come.

There are good deals to be found with Diamondback. They've been using the 4-bar suspension system for years wtih their XSL series. The four-bar system is pretty efficient. A quick check of Ebay found some nice XSL's in the $500-$600 range.


A good hardtail is a nice option, too. You can put some slicks on it and have a workable bike for running around the neighborhood that won't soak up as much energy as a FS will.

But go to the bike shops and go ride a bunch of 'em first. Get fitted. Budget enough for the accessories...lid, shorts, pump, etc. Buy from a local bike shop (LBS) if at all possible. Most of 'em throw in a year of basic maintenance with a new bike purchase...that'll take care of that first tune up and those "hey wouldja look at this..." issues that crop up.

As Floyd Landis demonstrated, you can have a pretty badly trashed hip and still ride even if you can't walk. I don't know specifically what you're dealing with but feel free to PM.
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