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Old 02-05-2010, 07:52 AM   #13411
skwidd
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gummee!
Remember: tighten towards the front of the bike on both sides and loosen towards the back of the bike on both sides.

DAMHIK how hard it gets if you get the non-drive side wrong.

M

Well, I didn't fuck it up.

I checked the threads on the new ones before I put a wrench on there, I don't want to know how much that carbon crank thing costs to replace.

Clipped the shoe in and it seems like plenty of free movement, these may be the right choice.

Do the snap rings that clip onto the pedal break?
Is this something that should be kept around as a spare for when you can't get to the shop?
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Old 02-05-2010, 08:00 AM   #13412
Oznerol
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetlou
What is the best way to adjust new cleats? I just installed some SPD-SL shimano 105's and the cleats just don't feel right. I have the crank centered over the ball of my feet but I think I need to adjust the angle/direction/whatever of the cleat.

Any insight?
The cleat/shoe interface should have some play to let you adjust the angle of the cleat relative to your shoe. Getting that angle right is really important for long-term comfort on the bike.

Better shops will offer cleat fittings, where they put you and your bike on a stationary trainer and use some special pedals that let them see how the cleat angle needs to be adjusted to put your foot in the right position. I had such a fitting done when I first went to clipless, and it was definitely useful.

Since then I've developed a pretty good feel for cleat placement, so I've made the adjustments myself when changing shoes or cleats. I put my bike on a stationary trainer, pedal a bit, adjust the cleat, pedal a bit, adjust, until I'm happy. If the cleat placement is off, I notice it in my knees, first. Also, the harder you're pedaling, the more obvious problems will be, so I use a gear that is a bit on the tough side, not an easy-spinning one.
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Old 02-05-2010, 09:02 AM   #13413
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in the OLD days of toeclips on campi pedals and hard soled shoes with cleats, we'd ride for a few days with the new shoe, then whatever our natural pedal position was, there'd be a nice groove in hte sole of the shoe, nail the cleat on right there, and voila! also the toeclips themselves came in a couple 3 different lengths, this would determine where the pedal axle was in relation to the ball of your foot.

those cleats gave you ZERO side to side play, your foot was held exactly in position when the straps were cinched. it took a very firm snap up and back to get your foot out in an emergency (eg, if you didn't have the time to release the straps)
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Old 02-05-2010, 09:24 AM   #13414
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pierce
in the OLD days of toeclips on campi pedals and hard soled shoes with cleats, we'd ride for a few days with the new shoe, then whatever our natural pedal position was, there'd be a nice groove in hte sole of the shoe, nail the cleat on right there, and voila! also the toeclips themselves came in a couple 3 different lengths, this would determine where the pedal axle was in relation to the ball of your foot.

those cleats gave you ZERO side to side play, your foot was held exactly in position when the straps were cinched. it took a very firm snap up and back to get your foot out in an emergency (eg, if you didn't have the time to release the straps)


(Careful - you're starting to sound like me. )

On my touring bike, I don't recall ever falling over from not being able to get my foot out. I rode the same pair of Diadora shoes for years - man, those shoes fit like gloves.
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Old 02-05-2010, 09:29 AM   #13415
HardCase
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oznerol
Just to provide a counterexample:

I had a lot of trouble with hotspots on long rides when using SPD or Crank Bros mountain pedals with cheapie soft-soled shoes.

I got some stiffer-soled Givi MTB shoes but stuck with the small Crank Bros pedals, and haven't had hotspots or any other foot problems since, even on all-day rides.
Makes sense, a good stiff-soled shoe ought to mitigate the smaller cleat to some extent. I think mine are decent, I did a number of 30 and 40 mile rides last summer and lots of 25 milers, and never noticed any hotspots. But I'll be mindful of it.
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Old 02-05-2010, 09:31 AM   #13416
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Sweet. Found out about this and managed to sneak in just last night.

http://www.chequamegon100.com/


Of course, I'll be well rested since the Almanzo 100 is just a week beforehand.
http://almanzo100.blogspot.com/

And I'll be starting out with a nice training base from sitting on my ass trying to stay awake for as long as possible for a week and half before that. http://www.onelapofamerica.com/

But hey, then I get a weekend off just before a nice, relaxing little dirt bike ride. http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=539384


So, I know this will kill me- I'm just wondering if it'll be a long slow thing or a nice quick one?
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Old 02-05-2010, 09:38 AM   #13417
pierce
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HardCase
Makes sense, a good stiff-soled shoe ought to mitigate the smaller cleat to some extent. I think mine are decent, I did a number of 30 and 40 mile rides last summer and lots of 25 milers, and never noticed any hotspots. But I'll be mindful of it.
forgot to add, the soles of the old school bike shoes were hard as a carved piece of wood. I don't remember what brand the 'good ones' were, but they were always black, very thin perforated leather tops, and that hard leather sole which also had a shaped steel band riveted in. really uncomfortable to walk even a short distance in, but great on the bike.
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Old 02-05-2010, 10:15 AM   #13418
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I made a bad bicycling decision of my own a few weeks back: Registration opened for D2R2:

http://www.franklinlandtrust.org/randonnee.html

...and I signed up for the long 180k route.

I've done the 100k version each of the last two years. The first year was pretty grueling but satisfying. The second year I was in poorer cycling condition, but had a better mindset about it and paced myself more carefully. So while I took longer than the first year, I finished the ride with a good bit left in the tank.

But I think it's going to take more than the right mindset to get me through the long one.


I'm also thinking about doing this charity ride from Boston to New York, with some of my coworkers who are also bike nuts:

http://www.tristatetrek.com/
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Old 02-05-2010, 10:19 AM   #13419
bergermeister
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who makes a comfortable seat for a reasonable price? mine isn't doing me any favors, especially on the trainer.
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Old 02-05-2010, 10:36 AM   #13420
HardCase
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pierce
forgot to add, the soles of the old school bike shoes were hard as a carved piece of wood. I don't remember what brand the 'good ones' were, but they were always black, very thin perforated leather tops, and that hard leather sole which also had a shaped steel band riveted in. really uncomfortable to walk even a short distance in, but great on the bike.
I remember those shoes from the 70s and early 80s too, weren't they Sidis? I think there were other brands, but that one sticks in my mind. I may even still have a pair in a box somewhere. I've got a couple pair of the old Look shoes from the late 80s, the ones that were red, yellow, white and I think gray, plus a pair of the old Look white pedals too. Hell, those things are probably antiques and collector's items nowadays.
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Old 02-05-2010, 11:04 AM   #13421
k7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pierce
forgot to add, the soles of the old school bike shoes were hard as a carved piece of wood. I don't remember what brand the 'good ones' were, but they were always black, very thin perforated leather tops, and that hard leather sole which also had a shaped steel band riveted in. really uncomfortable to walk even a short distance in, but great on the bike.
I'm thinking Diadora. Mine were purchased in 1977 in Austin TX at a shop that was literally the closest shop to San Antonio that carried bicycling clothing and shoes. Your description fits them to a tee.

It was always fun to walk in them - 'click/clack/scraaaap'
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Old 02-05-2010, 11:44 AM   #13422
pierce
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k7
I'm thinking Diadora. Mine were purchased in 1977 in Austin TX at a shop that was literally the closest shop to San Antonio that carried bicycling clothing and shoes. Your description fits them to a tee.

It was always fun to walk in them - 'click/clack/scraaaap'
yeah, a couple of my friends had these sandal like things you could slip over them for walking, gave you a heel and protected the metal cleat from getting bashed up on the pavement. I never did bother to get those.
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Old 02-05-2010, 11:51 AM   #13423
Askel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bergermeister
who makes a comfortable seat for a reasonable price? mine isn't doing me any favors, especially on the trainer.

I frickin' love the cheapo "racelux" saddles that came stock on treks for years. My dealer has a bin full of 'em for $5.

Which is good, because they last about 20 minutes under me in serious offroad use.
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Old 02-05-2010, 12:13 PM   #13424
k7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pierce
yeah, a couple of my friends had these sandal like things you could slip over them for walking, gave you a heel and protected the metal cleat from getting bashed up on the pavement. I never did bother to get those.
You know, I never saw those - I had the same cleats for years - those things were almost impossible to wear out in normal usage. It's not like you *wanted* to walk that far anyway.
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Old 02-05-2010, 03:12 PM   #13425
bergermeister
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Askel
I frickin' love the cheapo "racelux" saddles that came stock on treks for years. My dealer has a bin full of 'em for $5.

Which is good, because they last about 20 minutes under me in serious offroad use.
thanks man, I'll check it out. certainly can't get hurt on the investment.
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