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Old 04-19-2010, 04:39 PM   #14056
slackmeyer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pierce
my beloved 5 speed cruiser I've had like 30+ years and finally restored 3-4 years ago has bit it. the rear axle snapped yesterday on a gentle ride. :(

gee, anyone know any old school LBS's that might have a collection of eclectice Sturmey-Archer parts? I need the axle for a SBR-D rear drum brake derailleur style, circa 1978, like this one...

http://www.sturmey-archerheritage.co...-detail&id=122

that, or I'm gonna have to build a new wheel, or just use a 7 speed mtn bike rear and not have a rear brake (the seat stay angle above the rear tire is way too far from perpendicular for a caliber brake to work)
Try this: Harris Cyclery
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Old 04-19-2010, 07:39 PM   #14057
pierce
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slackmeyer
Try this: Harris Cyclery

i tried them 3-4 years ago when I 'restored' this bike (ok, stripped, cleaned, painted, lubed new cables, new tires, new handgrips and seat... is that a restoration?)... no luck then, I doubt its changed.

tsok, I'm already 80% of the way through converting the 5-speed to a 7-speed using the wheel off my older kids old GT Rebound mtn bike. its a decent wheel, Shimano Acera hub, 7 speed cassette. has a 11-28 gearing instead of my 14-34, so I'm going to need to get a smaller front sprocket to keep the same general range (I'll go from 44 to 34, I think, if I can fit it on the crank)

update. oops, can't put a 34 on a 130mm 5-post crank (38 minimum), so I guess I'm getting a 14-34 cassette. Sheldon Harris has them for $30, hard to beat (I'll try my LBS first, we have like 20 here).
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Old 04-19-2010, 08:22 PM   #14058
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pierce
yeah, they seem more OLD old stuff... what I need is from the 80s, long after Sturmey-Archer had ceased to be 'cool'.

eh, i'm probably going to end up going a totally different direction here.
They buy complete NOS inventory. So, don't give up on them, based on their site. They have tons of unlisted stuff in stock. Just drop them a line or give a jingle. Also, they're a tremendous resource to other specialists. If they don't have it, I bet they know who does.
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Old 04-20-2010, 06:16 AM   #14059
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jake28
A mtb question for the ADV pedal power collective:

I currently have a BMC cyclocross bike with a broken frame, http://jake28.smugmug.com/Bicycle/Br...59807531_H5BWz
I want to swap the parts to an all-mountain platform, probably a Giant Reign.
The parts I currently have:
XT rear group, LX front group, Avid BB7 cable disc brakes, DT Swiss wheels(QR) and a whole host of FSA and Ritchey carbon crap to huck on the new frame.
Basically I need a frame and fork to complete the build and I'll upgrade some odds and ends eventually.
Questions:
Is it work getting a through-axle front fork and a new wheel to go with it?
Any particular forks/frames I should look at besides the Reign?
Should I just sell what I have and go for a new complete bike?
Did you try and get the frame replaced by BMC? That is an obvious warranty issue.

In order to make a frame swap worth while you need to make sure a lot of you parts are going to work on the new one. The parts you need to check are: Seat post diameter, seat collar diameter, front derailleur clamp diameter, front derailleur clamp location (top Vs. bottom swing), Bottom bracket shell width, bottom bracket spindle length required, headset diameter, intergrated vs. external headset.

It is almost always easier and less expensive to buy a whole new bike. But is can be a lot of fun and a great learning experience trying to do it yourself.

Why do you want the Reign? Do you want to do freeride type riding. And yes, getting a through axle fork will balance the bike out.
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Old 04-20-2010, 12:33 PM   #14060
pierce
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k, so, back to my cruiser ... have got the wheel from my kid's old mtn bike on there with just a bit of frame stretching (hey, its steel, boing boing!). the 70s vintage suntour derailleur CAN reach all 7 gears, whooot (problem wasn't chain slack, its got more than enough chain takeup, the problem was the parallelogram didn't look like it was going to reach the big gear, but in fact, it shifts up and down just fine).

now. the 7 speed cassette is a pretty much standard mtn bike 11-28. my old 5 speed freewheel was a 14-34, and the gearing was just about perfect... the 14 was for tailwinds and dowhill flying, the 4th or 3rd gear were good for flats, 2nd for gentle hills and 1st for steep climbs)

Checked with a couple LBS's, all they had in basic shimano 7-speed cassette's was 11-28. with my 44 tooth front, the gearing is just too tall. the crank arm is a 130mm 5-post roadie style... apparently the smallest ring I can get for it is a 38. I calculate that 28:36 (1.294) is just about equiv to 34:44 (1.285), while a 28:38 is 1.36 which is going to seriously cut into my hill climbing power (wheeze wheeze). I see online I can get a "K" 13-34 shimano 7-speed, and its nicely spaced (13-15-17-20-24-29-34)

so... new bigger cluster is probably my best choice, rather than a 38 tooth chainring, eh?
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Old 04-20-2010, 07:14 PM   #14061
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Old rule of thumb: 1 tooth in the back is worth 3 in the front.

So, yeah. Bigger cogs = a better bet than a smaller chainring.

Isn't a rear axle a rear axle? They shouldn't be too hard to find. I don't know nuthin about SA rear hubs tho. Is it a special thread pitch or sumthin?

M
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Old 04-20-2010, 09:52 PM   #14062
pierce
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gummee!
Old rule of thumb: 1 tooth in the back is worth 3 in the front.

So, yeah. Bigger cogs = a better bet than a smaller chainring.

Isn't a rear axle a rear axle? They shouldn't be too hard to find. I don't know nuthin about SA rear hubs tho. Is it a special thread pitch or sumthin?

M
this Sturmey-Archer SBR drum has a hardened steel axle that has oversized cones, one of which is permanently attached, and I believe its an unusual thread too.

re: your 3:1, thats really rough. I'm calculating my ratios with the 44 front and 14-34 rear range from 1:3.14 to 1:1.3. For a fat-old-man's putz-around-town bike, thats a pretty decent range. with the same 44 front and a 13-45 7 speed, I'll get 1:3.38 to 1:1.13, with two extra gears in the middle, rock n roll! As the 1:3.14 is already too tall for level ground, I could drop my front chainring a couple teeth and get a 1:1.23 or even lower hill climber.

now I just have to figure out what to do about no rear brake :-/

I'm thinking maybe braze-ons for V-brakes is the way to go, I dunno. ruin the paint I put on it a few years ago but its already getting chewed up some. The trick thing to do would be to put the rear v-brake on the chain stay rather than the seat stay, as the seat stay is at a really cattiwompus angle. I'll have to scope the fit to see if it clears the chain ring, however.
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Old 04-20-2010, 10:16 PM   #14063
kyhillbilly
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I'm every new to mtb. I tried to get into it before but my Wal-mart bikes broke every ride so I just gave up. I always love to ride bicycles but I'm the only one of my friends that does so I ride alone. I picked up a bike about a month ago and it's been great! It's a Dawes Deadeye 29" single speed. I got a single speed because I always had trouble with the gears on my bikes and the SS would help me lose some of my 260+ pounds faster Overall it's a great bike for the money ($320) and I hope to stick with the sport because I like it and it helps me live longer
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Old 04-20-2010, 10:31 PM   #14064
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pierce
this Sturmey-Archer SBR drum has a hardened steel axle that has oversized cones, one of which is permanently attached, and I believe its an unusual thread too.
Aah gotcha. Like I said: I don't know diddly about the SA stuff. Never hadta work on em.

Quote:
re: your 3:1, thats really rough. I'm calculating my ratios with the 44 front and 14-34 rear range from 1:3.14 to 1:1.3. For a fat-old-man's putz-around-town bike, thats a pretty decent range. with the same 44 front and a 13-45 7 speed, I'll get 1:3.38 to 1:1.13, with two extra gears in the middle, rock n roll! As the 1:3.14 is already too tall for level ground, I could drop my front chainring a couple teeth and get a 1:1.23 or even lower hill climber.
Google 'gear inch charts' and look at em all worked out for ya. The math holds. No, its not *quite* 3-1, but its awful close.

Quote:
now I just have to figure out what to do about no rear brake :-/

I'm thinking maybe braze-ons for V-brakes is the way to go, I dunno. ruin the paint I put on it a few years ago but its already getting chewed up some. The trick thing to do would be to put the rear v-brake on the chain stay rather than the seat stay, as the seat stay is at a really cattiwompus angle. I'll have to scope the fit to see if it clears the chain ring, however.
cantis and v-brakes use the same mounting bosses. U-brakes and rollercams are different. I don't remember which you have on that bike. Rollercams are different than anything else... If you don't have 'the tool' they're harder to work on too. I've hadta play with rollercams a small bit over the years. Not a lot tho. Properly set up, cantis have *almost* as much power as v-brakes and on the rear, have enough to lock the wheel, which, as you know, is already too much. A skidding wheel is no longer under your control. Same reason Campy went to a single pivot rear brake and dual pivot front brake on their road stuff.

That help?

M
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Old 04-20-2010, 10:36 PM   #14065
pierce
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gummee!
cantis and v-brakes use the same mounting bosses. U-brakes and rollercams are different. I don't remember which you have on that bike.
this cruiser had a drum brake in the back, and its got a crappy chink-copy-of-a-diacompe-copy-of-a-crappy-weinmann-sidepull in the front. V-brakes would be a -huge- improvement, and the brake levers I have on the bars are those Tekro ones that have an internal adjustment for either V or normal pull brakes (the drum worked much better with the long pull v-brake setting)

I really meant to get the brazeons installed when I had the frame stripped for painting, but when I got it back from the sandblaster, it was -so- virgin purdy that I whisked it straight to the paint shop without thinking.
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Old 04-20-2010, 10:38 PM   #14066
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I've taken great advantage of this deployment (to the rear echelon as they say) to drop some 20+ lbs and get serious about running. I want to do better on the Duathlons and move my goal on the Saturday club rides from "almost finish with the group" to "finish in front of the fat guys". I'm no longer a Clydesdale.

I rode a bit more than 3600 miles on the Trek 2300 last year and learned my around it quite well. The first time I ever worked on it (or any bicycle), I tried adjusting the front derailleur because it was rubbing a bit. By the time I threw my hands up in disgust, the bike wouldn't shift anymore and the cable was badly frayed. Luckily the LBS took pity and only charged me their usual price for a tuneup vs. the price they should probably charge when some yahoo works on it first.

[IMG]
From Bicycle photos
[/IMG]


Last year was the first full year of bicycle riding (gone 8 months in 2008) and I made the best of it by completing a Century, a metric and one sprint Duathlon. Since then, I've acquired a bicycle repair manual (from Bicycling.com) and a nice Park Tool set (from an inmate).

The last time the Trek was at the LBS, the tech pointed out that some key components were nearing the end of their life (shifters, cassette, derailleurs, headset bearings, and probably the BB). They also pointed out that it was a bit small for me (that explains the gorilla on a tricycle joke a friend made when I rode up).

So, my master plan was to cajole the better half into buying some new furniture while I'm gone, wait a few months and mention in passing about looking for a new bike.

I've been shopping around am looking real hard at:

[IMG]
From Drop Box
[/IMG]

Great price point and I'm capable of the minor assembly and adjustments required (now, I've also got a friend who knows his way around bicycles).

I'd like to convert the Trek into a pure commuter (flat bars, wider tires, fenders, etc).

Thoughts on the Motobecane? and turning the Trek 2300 into a commuter?
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Old 04-20-2010, 10:47 PM   #14067
Gummee!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pierce
this cruiser had a drum brake in the back, and its got a crappy chink-copy-of-a-diacompe-copy-of-a-crappy-weinmann-sidepull in the front. V-brakes would be a -huge- improvement, and the brake levers I have on the bars are those Tekro ones that have an internal adjustment for either V or normal pull brakes (the drum worked much better with the long pull v-brake setting)

I really meant to get the brazeons installed when I had the frame stripped for painting, but when I got it back from the sandblaster, it was -so- virgin purdy that I whisked it straight to the paint shop without thinking.
May be easier to get a new fork. Rear brakes do less for ya than the fronts...

Just sayin

M
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Old 04-20-2010, 10:52 PM   #14068
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dolomoto
...and turning the Trek 2300 into a commuter?
I've seen it, but the Trek's not the best bet for that. Tight 80s geometry for one. Road position is different than the commuter position you're looking for.

You're better off trying to sell the 2300 and getting something that is a little more upright, with more clearance for bigger tires and fenders, and well, less fragile. The 2300 series had less of an issue with galvanic corrosion than the Specializedes of the same era, but they both have galvanic corrosion issues where the carbon tubes are bonded to the AL lugs.

'Course, this all depends on what you call commuting. Me? I LIKE the drop bars and skinny tires cause my idea of commuting involves minimal gear and higher speeds.

M
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Old 04-20-2010, 11:03 PM   #14069
pierce
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gummee!
May be easier to get a new fork. Rear brakes do less for ya than the fronts...
the fork on this bike is a steep rake minimal trail old school 26" BMX chrome moly tubular, probably a Red Line, stiff as hell, and its a 1" threaded headset. gonna be hard to find something suitable that doesn't drastically change the handling. at low speeds, this bike can do U-turns with the back tire hardly moving, and its geared low enough that I can ride along with pedestrians. yes, its a little squirrelly at high speeds, but the wide bars compensate nicely.

I know the back brake is mostly optional, but its really handy for low speed control, where the front brake might just dump you off (while doing said U turns at 0mph). we're talking about my festival bike...




speaking of v-brakes on the chain stay rather than seat stay... should the brakes be on top of or under the chain stay, you think? yes, I know they'll get really groadie either way. I'm thinking I'll want the cable pull on the side away from the sprockets, that kinda says to me they'd have to be under the stay ?

if I do put v-brakes on the seat stay, I'm probably gonna have to do something nasty to the brazeons so the brakes are perpendicular to the tangent of the rim, you can see the screwy angle of that seat stay on that pic above.
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pierce screwed with this post 04-20-2010 at 11:14 PM
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Old 04-20-2010, 11:08 PM   #14070
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P: your LBS should be able to get something from J&B to fit. IIRC there's a buncha forks in that catalog that should fit.

M
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